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Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Jonah 4

 

 

Verse 1

Jonah 4:1-11. Jonah frets at God‘s mercy to Nineveh: Is reproved by the type of a gourd.

angry — literally, “hot,” probably, with grief or vexation, rather than anger [Fairbairn]. How sad the contrast between God‘s feeling on the repentance of Nineveh towards Him, and Jonah‘s feeling on the repentance of God towards Nineveh. Strange in one who was himself a monument of mercy on his repentance! We all, like him, need the lesson taught in the parable of the unforgiving, though forgiven, debtor (Matthew 18:23-35). Jonah was grieved because Nineveh‘s preservation, after his denunciation, made him seem a false prophet [Calvin]. But it would make Jonah a demon, not a man, to have preferred the destruction of six hundred thousand men rather than that his prophecy should be set aside through God‘s mercy triumphing over judgment. And God in that case would have severely chastised, whereas he only expostulates mildly with him, and by a mode of dealing, at once gentle and condescending, tries to show him his error. Moreover, Jonah himself, in apologizing for his vexation, does not mention the failure of his prediction as the cause: but solely the thought of God‘s slowness to anger. This was what led him to flee to Tarshish at his first commission; not the likelihood then of his prediction being falsified; for in fact his commission then was not to foretell Nineveh‘s downfall, but simply to “cry against” Nineveh‘s “wickedness” as having “come up before God.” Jonah could hardly have been so vexed for the letter of his prediction failing, when the end of his commission had virtually been gained in leading Nineveh to repentance. This then cannot have been regarded by Jonah as the ultimate end of his commission. If Nineveh had been the prominent object with him, he would have rejoiced at the result of his mission. But Israel was the prominent aim of Jonah, as a prophet of the elect people. Probably then he regarded the destruction of Nineveh as fitted to be an example of God‘s judgment at last suspending His long forbearance so as to startle Israel from its desperate degeneracy, heightened by its new prosperity under Jeroboam II at that very time, in a way that all other means had failed to do. Jonah, despairing of anything effectual being done for God in Israel, unless there were first given a striking example of severity, thought when he proclaimed the downfall of Nineveh in forty days, that now at last God is about to give such an example; so when this means of awakening Israel was set aside by God‘s mercy on Nineveh‘s repentance, he was bitterly disappointed, not from pride or mercilessness, but from hopelessness as to anything being possible for the reformation of Israel, now that his cherished hope is baffled. But God‘s plan was to teach Israel, by the example of Nineveh, how inexcusable is their own impenitence, and how inevitable their ruin if they persevere. Repenting Nineveh has proved herself more worthy of God‘s favor than apostate Israel; the children of the covenant have not only fallen down to, but actually below, the level of a heathen people; Israel, therefore, must go down, and the heathen rise above her. Jonah did not know the important lessons of hope to the penitent, and condemnation to those amidst outward privileges impenitent, which Nineveh‘s preservation on repentance was to have for aftertimes, and to all ages. He could not foresee that Messiah Himself was thus to apply that history. A lesson to us that if we could in any particular alter the plan of Providence, it would not be for the better, but for the worse [Fairbairn].

Verse 2

my saying — my thought, or feeling.

fled beforeI anticipated by fleeing, the disappointment of my design through Thy long-suffering mercy.

gracious … and merciful, etc. — Jonah here has before his mind Exodus 34:6; as Joel (Joel 2:13) in his turn quotes from Jonah.

Verse 3

Jonah‘s impatience of life under disappointed hopes of Israel‘s reformation through the destruction of Nineveh, is like that of Elijah at his plan for reforming Israel (1 Kings 18:1-46) failing through Jezebel (1 Kings 19:4).

Verse 4

Doest thou well to be angry? — or grieved; rather as the Margin, “Art thou much angry,” or “grieved?” [Fairbairn with the Septuagint and Syriac]. But English Version suits the spirit of the passage, and is quite tenable in the Hebrew [Gesenius].

Verse 5

made him a booth — that is, a temporary hut of branches and leaves, so slightly formed as to be open to the wind and sun‘s heat.

see what would become of the city — The term of forty days had not yet elapsed, and Jonah did not know that anything more than a suspension, or mitigation, of judgment had been granted to Nineveh. Therefore, not from sullennesss, but in order to watch the event from a neighboring station, he lodged in the booth. As a stranger, he did not know the depth of Nineveh‘s repentance; besides, from the Old Testament standpoint he knew that chastening judgments often followed, as in David‘s case (2 Samuel 12:10-12, 2 Samuel 12:14), even where sin had been repented of. To show him what he knew not, the largeness and completeness of God‘s mercy to penitent Nineveh, and the reasonableness of it, God made his booth a school of discipline to give him more enlightened views.

Verse 6

gourdHebrew, {(kikaion}; the Egyptian kiki, the “ricinus” or castor-oil plant, commonly called “palm-christ” (palma-christi). It grows from eight to ten feet high. Only one leaf grows on a branch, but that leaf being often more than a foot large, the collective leaves give good shelter from the heat. It grows rapidly, and fades as suddenly when injured.

to deliver him from his grief — It was therefore grief, not selfish anger, which Jonah felt (see on Jonah 4:1). Some external comforts will often turn the) mind away from its sorrowful bent.

Verse 7

a worm — of a particular kind, deadly to the ricinus. A small worm at the root destroys a large gourd. So it takes but little to make our creature comforts wither. It should silence discontent to remember, that when our gourd is gone, our God is not gone.

the next day — after Jonah was so “exceeding glad” (compare Psalm 80:7).

Verse 8

vehement — rather, “scorching”; the Margin, “silent,” expressing sultry stillness, not vehemence.

Verse 9

(See on Jonah 4:4).

I do well to be angry, even unto death — “I am very much grieved, even to death” [Fairbairn]. So the Antitype (Matthew 26:38).

Verse 10-11

The main lesson of the book. If Jonah so pities a plant which cost him no toil to rear, and which is so short lived and valueless, much more must Jehovah pity those hundreds of thousands of immortal men and women in great Nineveh whom He has made with such a display of creative power, especially when many of them repent, and seeing that, if all in it were destroyed, “more than six score thousand” of unoffending children, besides “much cattle,” would be involved in the common destruction: Compare the same argument drawn from God‘s justice and mercy in Genesis 18:23-33. A similar illustration from the insignificance of a plant, which “to-day is and to-morrow is cast into the oven,” and which, nevertheless, is clothed by God with surpassing beauty, is given by Christ to prove that God will care for the infinitely more precious bodies and souls of men who are to live for ever (Matthew 6:28-30). One soul is of more value than the whole world; surely, then, one soul is of more value than many gourds. The point of comparison spiritually is the need which Jonah, for the time being, had of the foliage of the gourd. However he might dispense with it at other times, now it was necessary for his comfort, and almost for his life. So now that Nineveh, as a city, fears God and turns to Him, God‘s cause needs it, and would suffer by its overthrow, just as Jonah‘s material well-being suffered by the withering of the gourd. If there were any hope of Israel‘s being awakened by Nineveh‘s destruction to fulfil her high destination of being a light to surrounding heathenism, then there would not have been the same need to God‘s cause of Nineveh‘s preservation, (though there would have always been need of saving the penitent). But as Israel, after judgments, now with returning prosperity turns back to apostasy, the means needed to vindicate God‘s cause, and provoke Israel, if possible, to jealousy, is the example of the great capital of heathendom suddenly repenting at the first warning, and consequently being spared. Thus Israel would see the kingdom of heaven transplanted from its ancient seat to another which would willingly yield its spiritual fruits. The tidings which Jonah brought back to his countrymen of Nineveh‘s repentance and rescue, would, if believingly understood, be far more fitted than the news of its overthrow to recall Israel to the service of God. Israel failed to learn the lesson, and so was cast out of her land. But even this was not an unmitigated evil. Jonah was a type, as of Christ, so also of Israel. Jonah, though an outcast, was highly honored of God in Nineveh; so Israel‘s outcast condition would prove no impediment to her serving God‘s cause still, if only she was faithful to God. Ezekiel and Daniel were so at Babylon; and the Jews, scattered in all lands as witnesses for the one true God, pioneered the way for Christianity, so that it spread with a rapidity which otherwise was not likely to have attended it [Fairbairn].

Verse 11

that cannot discern between their right hand and their left — children under three of four years old (Deuteronomy 1:39). Six score thousand of these, allowing them to be a fifth of the whole, would give a total population of six hundred thousand.

much cattle — God cares even for the brute creatures, of which man takes little account. These in wonderful powers and in utility are far above the shrub which Jonah is so concerned about. Yet Jonah is reckless as to their destruction and that of innocent children. The abruptness of the close of the book is more strikingly suggestive than if the thought had been followed out in detail.

 


Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Jonah 4:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". "http://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/view.cgi?book=jon&chapter=004". 1871-8.

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