corner graphic   Hi,    
ver. 2.0.20.01.17
Finding the new version too difficult to understand? Go to classic.studylight.org/

Study the Bible

The Amplified Bible
Exodus 2:25

God saw the Israelites and took knowledge of them and concerned Himself about them [knowing all, understanding, remembering all].

Bible Study Resources

Commentaries:

- Clarke Commentary;   Birdgeway Bible Commentary;   Coffman Commentaries;   Chuck Smith Commentary;   Dummelow's Commentary on the Bible ;   Constable's Expository Notes;   Meyer's Commentary;   Morgan's Biblical Exposition;   Gill's Exposition;   Everett's Study Notes;   Geneva Study Bible;   Haydock's Catholic Commentary;   Gray's Commentary;   The People's Bible;   Sutcliffe's Commentary;   Trapp's Commentary;   Keil & Delitzsch;   Kretzmann's Popular Commentary of the Bible;   Lange's Commentary on the Holy Scriptures;   Grant's Commentary;   Wells of Living Water;   Henry's Complete;   Henry's Concise;   Poole's Annotations;   Mackintosh's Notes;   Pett's Bible Commentary;   Peake's Bible Commentary;   Preacher's Homiletical Commentary;   Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary;   Benson's Commentary;   Biblical Illustrator;   Expositor's Bible;   Pulpit Commentaries;   Treasury of Knowledge;   Whedon's Commentary;  

Concordances:

- Nave's Topical Bible - God Continued...;   Israel;   Prayer;   Thompson Chain Reference - Divine;   Favour, Divine;   Favour-Disfavour;   God;  

Dictionaries:

- Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - God;   Moses;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Bondage;   Holman Bible Dictionary - God;   Promise;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Exodus;   Moses;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Love;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Moses;  

Encyclopedias:

- Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Exodus, the;   Moses, the Man of God;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Exodus, the Book of;  

Parallel Translations

American Standard Version
And God saw the children of Israel, and God took knowledge [of them].

Darby's Translation
and God looked upon the children of Israel, and God acknowledged [them].

Bible in Basic English
And God's eyes were turned to the children of Israel and he gave them the knowledge of himself.

The Bishop's Bible (1568)
And God loked vpon the chyldren of Israel, and God had respecte vnto them.

Contemporary English Version
and because he knew what was happening to his people, he felt sorry for them.

The Geneva Bible (1587)
So God looked vpon the children of Israel, and God had respect vnto them.

Easy-to-Read Version
God saw the troubles of the people of Israel, and he knew {that he would soon help them}.

English Standard Version
God saw the people of Israel - and God knew.

George Lamsa Translation of the Peshitta
And God looked upon the children of Israel, and God noticed their oppression.

Brenton Translaton of the Septuagint (LXX)
And God looked upon the children of Israel, and was made known to them.

English Revised Version
And God saw the children of Israel, and God took knowledge of them.

The Complete Jewish Bible
God saw the people of Isra'el, and God acknowledged them.

Good News Translation
He saw the slavery of the Israelites and was concerned for them.

Holman Christian Standard
God saw the Israelites, and He took notice.

Hebrew Names Version
God saw the children of Yisra'el, and God was concerned about them.

New American Standard Version
God saw the sons of Israel, and God took notice of them.

J.P. Green Literal Translation
And God saw the sons of Israel, and God knew them .

Miles Coverdale Bible (1535)
And God loked vpon the childre of Israel, and God knew it.

New Living Translation
He looked down on the Israelites and felt deep concern for their welfare.

New Life Version
God saw the people of Israel and He cared about them.

New International Version
So God looked on the Israelites and was concerned about them.

New King James
And God looked upon the children of Israel, and God acknowledged them.

JPS Old Testament
And God saw the children of Israel, and God took cognizance of them.

King James Version (1611)
And God looked vpon the children of Israel, and God had respect vnto them.

New Century Version
He saw the troubles of the people of Israel, and he was concerned about them.

New Revised Standard
God looked upon the Israelites, and God took notice of them.

King James Version
And God looked upon the children of Israel, and God had respect unto them.

The Emphasised Bible
so then, God looked upon the sons of Israel, - and God regarded.

Douay-Rheims Bible
And the Lord looked upon the children of Israel, and he knew them.

Revised Standard Version
And God saw the people of Israel, and God knew their condition.

Updated Bible Version 1.9
And God saw the sons of Israel, and God took knowledge [of them].

The Webster Bible
And God looked upon the children of Israel, and God had respect to [them].

World English Bible
God saw the children of Israel, and God was concerned about them.

The Wycliffe Bible (1395)
and knewe hem.

Young's Literal Translation
and God seeth the sons of Israel, and God knoweth.

The Message
God saw what was going on with Israel. God understood.

Lexham English Bible
and God saw the Israelites, and God took notice.

Contextual Overview

23However, after a long time [nearly forty years] the king of Egypt died; and the Israelites were sighing and groaning because of the bondage. They kept crying, and their cry because of slavery ascended to God. 24And God heard their sighing and groaning and [earnestly] remembered His covenant with Abraham, with Isaac, and with Jacob. 25God saw the Israelites and took knowledge of them and concerned Himself about them [knowing all, understanding, remembering all].

Verse Review

from
Treasury of Scripure Knowledge

And God looked upon the children of Israel, and God had respect unto them.
looked
4:31; 1 Samuel 1:11; 2 Samuel 16:12; Job 33:27; Luke 1:25
God
For elohim, God, Houbigant reads aleyhem, unto them; which is countenanced by the LXX., Vulgate, Chaldee, Coptic, and Arabic, and appears to have been the original reading.
had respect
Heb. knew.
1:8; 3:7,8; Psalms 1:6; 55:22; Matthew 7:23

Cross-References

Genesis 2:10
Now a river went out of Eden to water the garden; and from there it divided and became four [river] heads.

Genesis 2:11
The first is named Pishon; it is the one flowing around the whole land of Havilah, where there is gold.

Genesis 3:7
Then the eyes of them both were opened, and they knew that they were naked; and they sewed fig leaves together and made themselves apronlike girdles.

Exodus 32:25
And when Moses saw that the people were unruly and unrestrained (for Aaron had let them get out of control, so that they were a derision and object of shame among their enemies),

Psalms 25:3
Yes, let none who trust and wait hopefully and look for You be put to shame or be disappointed; let them be ashamed who forsake the right or deal treacherously without cause.

Psalms 31:17
Let me not be put to shame, O Lord, or disappointed, for I am calling upon You; let the wicked be put to shame, let them be silent in Sheol (the place of the dead).

Isaiah 44:9
All who make graven idols are confusion, chaos, and worthlessness. Their objects (idols) in which they delight do not profit them, and their own witnesses (worshipers) do not see or know, so that they are put to shame.

Isaiah 47:3
Your nakedness shall be exposed, and your shame shall be seen. I will take vengeance, and I will spare no man [none I encounter will be able to resist Me],

Isaiah 54:4
Fear not, for you shall not be ashamed; neither be confounded and depressed, for you shall not be put to shame. For you shall forget the shame of your youth, and you shall not [seriously] remember the reproach of your widowhood any more.

Jeremiah 6:15
Were they brought to shame because they had committed abominations (extremely disgusting and vile things)? No, they were not at all ashamed, nor could they blush [at their idolatry]. Therefore they shall fall among those who fall; at the time that I punish them they shall be overthrown, says the Lord.

Gill's Notes on the Bible

And God looked upon the children of Israel,.... With an eye of pity and compassion, and saw all the hardships they laboured under, and all the injuries that were done unto them:

and God had respect unto them; had a favourable regard to them; or "knew" not only them, the Israelites, and loved them, and approved of them, and owned them as his own, all which words of knowledge sometimes signify; but he knew their sorrows and sufferings, and took notice of what was done to them secretly; see Exodus 3:7.

Clarke's Notes on the Bible

And God had respect unto them - אלהים וידע vaiyeda Elohim, God knew them, i.e., he approved of them, and therefore it is said that their cry came up before God, and he heard their groaning. The word ידע yada, to know, in the Hebrew Bible, as well as γινωσκω in the Greek Testament, is frequently used in the sense of approving; and because God knew - had respect for and approved of, them, therefore he was determined to deliver them. For אלהים Elohim, God, in the last clause of this verse, Houbigant reads אליהם aleyhem, Upon Them, which is countenanced by the Vulgate, Septuagint, Chaldee, Coptic, and Arabic, and appears to have been the original reading. The difference in the original consists in the interchange of two letters, the י yod and ה he . Our translators insert unto them, in order to make up that sense which this various reading gives without trouble.

The farther we proceed in the sacred writings, the more the history both of the grace and providence of God opens to our view. He ever cares for his creatures, and is mindful of his promise. The very means made use of to destroy his work are, in his hands, the instruments of its accomplishment. Pharaoh orders the male children of the Hebrews to be thrown into the river; Moses, who was thus exposed, is found by his own daughter, brought up as her own son, and from his Egyptian education becomes much better qualified for the great work to which God had called him; and his being obliged to leave Egypt was undoubtedly a powerful means to wean his heart from a land in which he had at his command all the advantages and luxuries of life. His sojourning also in a strange land, where he was obliged to earn his bread by a very painful employment, fitted him for the perilous journey he was obliged to take in the wilderness, and enabled him to bear the better the privations to which he was in consequence exposed.

The bondage of the Israelites was also wisely permitted, that they might with less reluctance leave a country where they had suffered the greatest oppression and indignities. Had they not suffered severely previously to their departure, there is much reason to believe that no inducements could have been sufficient to have prevailed on them to leave it. And yet their leaving it was of infinite consequence, in the order both of grace and providence, as it was indispensably necessary that they should be a people separated from all the rest of the world, that they might see the promises of God fulfilled under their own eyes, and thus have the fullest persuasion that their law was Divine, their prophets inspired by the Most High, and that the Messiah came according to the prophecies before delivered concerning him.

From the example of Pharaoh's daughter, (see Clarke's note Exodus 2:5;), and the seven daughters of Jethro, ( Exodus 2:16;), we learn that in the days of primitive simplicity, and in this respect the best days, the children, particularly the daughters of persons in the highest ranks in life, were employed in the most laborious offices. Kings' daughters performed the office of the laundress to their own families; and the daughters of princes tended and watered the flocks. We have seen similar instances in the case of Rebekah and Rachel; and we cannot be too pointed in calling the attention of modern delicate females, who are not only above serving their own parents and family, but even their own selves: the consequence of which is, they have neither vigor nor health; their growth, for want of healthy exercise, is generally cramped; their natural powers are prematurely developed, and their whole course is rather an apology for living, than a state of effective life. Many of these live not out half their days, and their offspring, when they have any, is more feeble than themselves; so that the race of man where such preposterous conduct is followed (and where is it not followed?) is in a state of gradual deterioration. Parents who wish to fulfill the intention of God and nature, will doubtless see it their duty to bring up their children on a different plan. A worse than the present can scarcely be found out.

Afflictions, under the direction of God's providence and the influence of his grace, are often the means of leading men to pray to and acknowledge God, who in the time of their prosperity hardened their necks from his fear. When the Israelites were sorely oppressed, they began to pray. If the cry of oppression had not been among them, probably the cry for mercy had not been heard. Though afflictions, considered in themselves, can neither atone for sin nor improve the moral state of the soul, yet God often uses them as means to bring sinners to himself, and to quicken those who, having already escaped the pollutions of the world, were falling again under the influence of an earthly mind. Of many millions besides David it may truly be said, Before they were afflicted they went astray.


Copyright Statement:
The Amplified Bible
Copyright © 1954, 1958, 1962, 1964, 1965, 1987 by The Lockman Foundation
All rights reserved. Used by permission.
For useage information, please visit https://www.lockman.org/
The "Amplified" trademark is registered in the United States Patent and Trademark Office by The Lockman Foundation. Use of this trademark requires the permission of The Lockman Foundation.

Lectionary Calendar
Friday, January 17th, 2020
the First Week after Epiphany
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
To report dead links, typos, or html errors or suggestions about making these resources more useful use our convenient contact form
Powered by Lightspeed Technology