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Bible Commentaries

Preacher's Complete Homiletical Commentary
Romans

Chapter 1 Chapter 2 Chapter 3 Chapter 4
Chapter 5 Chapter 6 Chapter 7 Chapter 8
Chapter 9 Chapter 10 Chapter 11 Chapter 12
Chapter 13 Chapter 14 Chapter 15 Chapter 16

Book Overview - Romans

The Preacher's Complete Homiletic

COMMENTARY

ON THE EPISTLE OF ST. PAUL THE APOSTLE TO THE

Romans

By the REV. W. BURROWS, M.A.

Author of the Commentary on Esther

NEW YORK

FUNK & WAGNALLS COMPANY

LONDON AND TORONTO

1892

THE PREACHER'S COMPLETE HOMILETIC

COMMENTARY

ON THE BOOKS OF THE BIBLE

WITH CRITICAL AND EXPLANATORY NOTES, INDEXES, ETC., BY VARIOUS AUTHORS

THE

PREACHER'S HOMILETICAL COMMENTARY

ROMANS

INTRODUCTION

The Epistle to the Romans was written by St. Paul, either at the end of the year 57 or at the beginning of the year 58. It may be safe to assign the date to the spring of the latter year. It was written after some of the other epistles, but has in our Bible the position of precedence. However, the epistles are not arranged according to the order of the time in which they were written. Their order has been determined by the importance of the societies or persons to whom they were addressed. The arrangement was of rapid growth, and arose, as some assert, out of the intuitive feeling of the early Church. Let us, however, not rest satisfied with the suggestion of intuitive feeling. The arrangement is confessedly excellent, and speaks of the wisdom of the fathers of the Church who were directed by divine wisdom. If we desire a proof of the inspiration of the New Testament, we may point to the admirable order and wise systematic arrangement of the books of which it is composed. It is fitting that this epistle should stand in the forefront of St. Paul's compositions, since it was addressed to the Church situated in the metropolis of the then known world. There were collected different nationalities. From this centre of martial power and intellectual light and leading radiated many different influences. Surely not without satisfactory reason was this epistle—written on the relation of Jew and Gentile, unfolding the true doctrine of justification by faith, vindicating the ways of God with man, and enforcing lessons of wise tolerance for all time—placed in the forefront of all the sacred epistles.

The epistle may be divided into four main parts, with many subdivisions which need not now be enumerated:—PART I., the INTRODUCTION, contained in the first fifteen verses of the first chapter; PART II., the DOCTRINAL PART of the epistle, concerning JUSTIFICATION, continues thence to the end of chap. xi.; PART III. comprises the HORTATORY OR PRACTICAL PART of the epistle; PART IV. the CONCLUSION. The epistle was evidently written, not under pressure of anxiety, but in calm deliberation. It was apparently composed in the house of a Corinthian Christian, who is known to us only by the name Gaius or Caius. It was dictated by St. Paul to the amanuensis Tertius. Surely the pen of the writer would be arrested in its course as the mind was caught up by the glowing periods of the eighth chapter. What a light, what a far-away look, would be on the speaker's face as he thought on fate, free will, foreknowledge absolute! The precious letter was carried by Phœbe to Rome. A woman carried the greatest document of time. It was safe in her hands, for she was in the hands of Omnipotence. It is safe still. St. Paul has had many critics, but no compeers. In what roll of fame is Evanson's name now chronicled? Where shall we look for his monument? We ask the publisher for the work of him who assailed the genuineness of the Epistle to the Romans, and very likely the publisher has not heard the name. Time has sadly overcome the fame of Evanson, while JUST TIME has gladly increased the fame of our apostle. He still lives as an influential power. One St. Paul is sufficient to glorify a race. One Epistle to the Romans is adequate to ennoble all literature. We may approach the work in trembling, and earnestly pray for divine light and guidance as we attempt a homiletical treatment of the immortal treatise. Our work is well-nigh done, and it is an attempt, after all; still, we unwillingly lay down the pen, and remain deeper and firmer in our admiration of St. Paul, and stronger in our conception of the depth of the riches of the knowledge, wisdom, and mercy of God. It will be a joy if any study is cheered by rays of heaven's light, if the voice of the pulpit is clearer and fuller, if the Church is enriched, by the contribution we make to the well-being of humanity.

HOMILIES FOR SPECIAL OCCASIONS

Church Seasons: Advent and Christmas, Rom ; Rom 8:3-4; Rom 8:32; Rom 13:12. St. Paul's Day, Rom 7:4. Good Friday, Rom 5:6. Easter, Rom 4:25; Rom 5:10; Rom 6:1-11. Whitsun Day, Rom 8:15-17. Sabbath, Rom 6:1; Rom 13:5-6.

Holy Communion: Rom ; Rom 2:25-29.

Foreign Missions: To Heathen, Rom ; Rom 1:22-32; Rom 2:14; Rom 6:21; Rom 10:12-18; Rom 15:17-21. To Jews, Rom 9:25-33; Rom 10:1-4; Rom 10:18-21; Rom 11:1-5; Romans 6 -

10. Bible Society, Rom ; Rom 4:3; Rom 15:4; Romans 13.

Evangelistic Services: Rom ; Rom 3:24; Rom 4:7; Rom 5:7-8; Rom 6:23; Rom 10:6-8.

Special: Workers, Rom . G. F. S., etc., Rom 16:1-2. Parents, Rom 16:5. Servants, Rom 12:11. Scientific, Rom 1:20. Christian Communism, Rom 12:13-16; Rom 13:7-10; Rom 15:27. Almsgiving, Rom 15:25-29.

Lectionary Calendar
Tuesday, October 15th, 2019
the Week of Proper 23 / Ordinary 28
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