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Bible Commentaries

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible
Psalms 125

 

 

Verse 1

Psalms 125.

The safety of such as trust in God. A prayer for the godly, and against the wicked.

A Song of Degrees.

Title. המעלות שׁיר Shiir hammangaloth.] The title of this psalm does not tell us its author. Bishop Patrick supposes it to have been a pious exhortation to the people, to trust in God, when Sennacherib's army threatened them with destruction; and perhaps, says he, these were some of the comfortable words which, as we read, Hezekiah spoke to them, 2 Chronicles 32:6-8 when God chastised them by that rod of his anger, as he calls Sennacherib, Isaiah 10:5 which the Psalmist here foretold should not long afflict them. But Dr. Delaney supposes it to have been made by David just before the attack of the strongholds of Sion; and in this light he would consider the Psalmist as answering the objections which we may imagine to have been made in a council of war held upon this occasion, from the great strength of the place; and religiously reminding them, that under the good providence of God they might be confident of surmounting all difficulties. Life of David, book 2: chap. 6.


Verse 2

Psalms 125:2. As the mountains are round, &c.— This allusion to the situation of Jerusalem expresses very properly the divine protection, which defended them on every side from the outrages and insults of their enemies. Perhaps the short description of it which Mr. Sandys has given us, may help us to conceive this matter the better. "This city," says he, "is seated on a rocky mountain, every way to be ascended, except a little on the north, with steep ascents and deep vallies naturally fortified: for the most part environed with other not far removed mountains, as if placed in the midst of an amphitheatre; for on the east is mount Olivet, separated from the city by the valley of Jehoshaphat, which also circleth part of the north. On the south the mountain of Ossiner interposed with the valley of Gehinnom; and on the west it was formerly fenced with the valley of Gihon and the mountains adjoining."


Verse 3

Psalms 125:3. For the rod That is, the power of the wicked shall not rest upon the lot or portion; i.e. the country of the righteous; that the righteous, &c. The meaning seems to be, that if their enemies had gained their purpose on Jerusalem, and continued in possession of it, there would have been an utter extinction of the Jewish religion; they would all have been confounded in one scene of iniquity: the righteous would either have been forced or tempted to do as the rest did.

REFLECTIONS.—They who have an almighty God to fly to, have nothing to fear; and his great and precious promises are a sure support to every faithful soul.

1. Their character. They are his people, justified through the blood of the covenant, converted by his Spirit, and separated for his service. They trust in the Lord, on his merit and on his strength, for pardon, acceptance, support, and comfort, under every trial and difficulty. They are righteous through his grace,—their hearts and ways are renewed. Blessed are the people who are in such a case, for to them all the promises of God are yea and amen in Christ Jesus.

2. He prays that God would fulfil what he promises. Do good, O Lord, unto those that be good, and to them that are upright in their hearts; such they are by his grace, and such he trusts they will continue, the God of all grace continuing to vouchsafe to them a continual rich supply of his spiritual blessings in Christ Jesus.

3. He foresees and foretels the end of the ungodly. As for such as turn aside unto their crooked ways, either the sinners, who rush into the paths of error and immorality, or the false professors, who in time of trial apostatise, and fly to sinful expedients to extricate themselves from their sufferings, the Lord shall lead them forth with the workers of iniquity, to the place of terrible execution, and cast them into that eternal abyss, where the worm dieth not, and the fire is not quenched: but peace shall be upon Israel; it is either a prayer that it may be, or a promise that it shall be so. The end of the righteous is as blessed as the end of the wicked is miserable; peace, present and eternal, is their happy portion; and when the smoke of their torment, who have no rest night nor day, ascendeth, the saints in glory shall rejoice and sing.

 


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Bibliography Information
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Psalms 125:4". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/psalms-125.html. 1801-1803.

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