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Historical Writings

Today in Christian History

Sunday, May 14

1610
Assassination at Paris of Henry IV of France, formerly a Huguenot, who had converted to Catholicism to become king.
1826
Baptism of Nathanael Tajkhan, formerly a Muslim, then a Hindu, until he heard the word of God. He became a zealous convert, preaching wherever he had opportunity, although renounced by his village. He won his wife and some others to Christ before his untimely death.
1846
During the construction of a new cathedral at Zadonsk, remains of Tikhon, the Russian Orthodox bishop of Veronezh, are uncovered incorrupt. Many miracles will be reported occurring near them and he will be named a saint. He had written spiritual works stressing love and forgiveness.
1858
Death in South Windsor, Connecticut, of Bennet Tyler, a Congregational theologian who had served as president of Dartmouth College and was a founder of the Theological Institute of Connecticut (now Hartford Seminary). While he was president of Dartmouth, the college admitted its first African-American student.
1901
Althea Brown, an African-American Christian, is commissioned to go to Africa as a missionary. She will die there of malaria and sleeping sickness after compiling a dictionary and grammar of the Bushoong tribal language.
1932
Death of John Hughes, 59, Welsh rail official and church worker. During his life, Hughes composed a number of hymns, including CWM RHONDDA, to which the Church today still sings "Guide Me, O Thou Great Jehovah."
1948
Defying the advice of his State and War Departments, President Harry Truman issues a de facto recognition of the State of Israel within hours of its declaration of independence.
1950
American missionary and martyr Jim Elliot wrote in his journal: 'To believe is to act as though a thing were so. Merely saying a thing is so is no proof of my believing it.'
1974
In the Anglican Church in England, the Rev. F. Donald Coggan, 64, was named the 101st Archbishop of Canterbury by Queen Elizabeth II, succeeding former Archbishop Michael Ramsey.
1995
Fr Oleg Steniaev and Bishop Arseney Epifanov of Istrinsk (vicar of Patriarch Alexis II), burn books of Leo Tolstoy, Nikolai Rerikh, Vladimir Soloviev, Sergei Bulgakov, Paul Florensky, and others in a church yard. The authors had written works that were considered either heretical or liberal.

Copyright Statement
© 1987-2020, William D. Blake. Portions used by permission of the author, from "Almanac of the Christian Church"