Historical Writings

Today in Christian History

Wednesday, September 25

1392
Death of Sergius of Radonezh, a monastic reformer, and one of the most revered saints of Russia. His reforms had emphasized that monks should live by their own labor. Forty groups went out from his original monastery, the Trinity Lavra of St. Sergius, settling in difficult places that they cultivated until they became centers of expanding civilization.
1555
Promulgation of the Peace of Augsburg which created a legal basis for Lutheran and Catholic states to live side by side in the Holy Roman Empire.
1643
Members of the Westminster Assembly and the Scottish Commissioners subscribe to the Solemn League and Covenant, allying Parliament with the Scots Covenanters.
1727
Death of Jacques Abbadie. He had become a doctor of theology at the age of seventeen, organized Huguenot churches in Berlin, and pastored in France, England, and Ireland. A Calvinist, his writings, such as The Truth of the Christian Religion, had battled atheism, Arianism, deism, and socinianism.
1789
Elias Boudinot, a representative of New Jersey, asks Congress to appoint a joint committee of the House and Senate to approach President Washington with a petition to proclaim a day of thanksgiving. This sparks vigorous debate about separation of church and state and whether the president has the authority under the constitution. In the end the resolution is approved. President Washington, mindful of the limits of his authority, requests the individual states to comply with his proclamation.
1872
Death of Peter Cartwright, 87, early American Methodist circuit rider. Converted at age 29, Cartwright possessed a rough, uneducated and eccentric personality; but he spent over 50 of his 87 years spreading the Gospel through the Midwestern frontiers of Kentucky and Illinois.
1897
William Raws founds America's Keswick Colony of Mercy as a spiritual restoration center for men who have become addicted to alcohol.
1908
Death of English Old Testament textual scholar Henry A. Redpath, 60. From 1892-1906, Redpath and Edwin Hatch compiled "A Concordance to the Septuagint and Other Greek Versions of the Old Testament"-- still in print today!
1929
J. Gresham Machen gives the inaugural address of Westminster Seminary to a class of fifty students and some guests.
1941
Death of Warren Akin Candler, a prominent figure in the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and the first chancellor of Emory University. A strong proponent of traditional Christian morals and a vigorous opponent of racism, he spoke out strongly against lynching and insisted on integrating the faculty of Paine Institute, a college that he had helped found to educate African-American clergy.

Copyright Statement
© 1987-2020, William D. Blake. Portions used by permission of the author, from "Almanac of the Christian Church"