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Historical Writings

Today in Christian History

Thursday, October 3

1226
Death of St. Francis of Assisi, mystic and founder of the Franciscan order.
1260
The remains of St. Clare of Assisi are transferred from the church of St. George in Assisi to the St. Chiara, specially built to receive her relics. Those who shift her corpse are awed to find that it is "incorrupt," which they take as proof of her sanctity.
1531
Zwingli and Luther part at Marburg. Zwingli offers his hand, but Luther rejects it. The two had agreed on every issue except the theology of the Lord's supper.
1690
Death of Robert Barclay, a Scot who systematized Quaker theology in his Apology for the True Christian Divinity. He argued that worship that lacks Christ's presence is a sham and that the Bible can only be understood if the Holy Spirit illuminates a person from within. He had been imprisoned several times for his faith.
1691
The Treaty of Limerick is signed, making King William III of England the ruler of Ireland. The defenders of Limerick had fought so courageously that the treaty grants them the right to march out with honors and promises Catholics free exercise of their religion in Ireland.
1778
Anglican clergyman and hymnwriter John Newton wrote in a letter: 'A real conviction of our weakness we cannot learn merely from books or preachers. The providence of God concurs ... in making us acquainted with ourselves.'
1796
Jean-Louis Anne Madelain Lefebvre de Cheverus settles in Boston, Massachusetts, where he will become the first bishop of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Boston. He will labor among Indians, learning their language, and work hard ministering to Catholics and victims of yellow fever.
1875
Death of James Cameron, Madagascar missionary.
1943
Lutheran pastor Kjeldgaard Jensen in Gilleleje, Denmark, reads a letter from his nation's bishops, instructing Danes to assist in the rescue of Jews from impending Nazi deportation to death camps. The bishops remind their flocks that Jesus was a Jew, that persecution violates the command to love one's neighbor, and that it is contrary to Danish conceptions of justice. This will inspire the town to hide over 1,300 Jews and transport most of them to neutral Sweden.
1966
Death of Orthodox deacon Ieronymos of Aegina. On account of his zealous, holy, and prayerful life he will be considered a candidate for formal sainthood.

Copyright Statement
© 1987-2020, William D. Blake. Portions used by permission of the author, from "Almanac of the Christian Church"