Historical Writings

Today in Christian History

Wednesday, October 3

1531
Zwingli and Luther part at Marburg. Zwingli offers his hand, but Luther rejects it. The two had agreed on every issue except the theology of the Lord's supper.
1690
Death of Robert Barclay, a Scot who systematized Quaker theology in his Apology for the True Christian Divinity. He argued that worship that lacks Christ's presence is a sham and that the Bible can only be understood if the Holy Spirit illuminates a person from within. He had been imprisoned several times for his faith.
1691
The Treaty of Limerick is signed, making King William III of England the ruler of Ireland. The defenders of Limerick had fought so courageously that the treaty grants them the right to march out with honors and promises Catholics free exercise of their religion in Ireland.
1692
In Massachusetts, Increase Mather published his "Cases of Conscience Concerning Evil Spirits," which effectively brought an end to the Salem Witch Trials which had begun earlier this year.
1778
Anglican clergyman and hymnwriter John Newton wrote in a letter: 'A real conviction of our weakness we cannot learn merely from books or preachers. The providence of God concurs ... in making us acquainted with ourselves.'
1875
Death of James Cameron, Madagascar missionary.
1877
The Union Church of Christ is organized in Japan.
1919
Death of Daniel B. Towner, American music evangelist, who had worked with Dwight L. Moody and been head of the Music Department of Moody Bible Institute. He had composed more than 2,000 songs, including MOODY ("Marvelous Grace of Our Loving Lord"), CALVARY ("Years I Spent in Vanity and Pride"), and TRUST AND OBEY ("When We Walk with the Lord").
1938
Death of Kuang Fuzhou, the first Chinese in the world raised to staff level in the Salvation Army.
1943
Lutheran pastor Kjeldgaard Jensen in Gilleleje, Denmark, reads a letter from his nation's bishops, instructing Danes to assist in the rescue of Jews from impending Nazi deportation to death camps. The bishops remind their flocks that Jesus was a Jew, that persecution violates the command to love one's neighbor, and that it is contrary to Danish conceptions of justice. This will inspire the town to hide over 1,300 Jews and transport most of them to neutral Sweden.

Copyright Statement
© 1987-2020, William D. Blake. Portions used by permission of the author, from "Almanac of the Christian Church"