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"Insight for Living" with "Chuck Swindoll"

Delighting in Your Children, Part 2

Thursday, March 23, 2017

Chuck SwindollWe have spent quite a bit of time focusing on the demanding and difficult challenges of rearing children: acknowledging depravity, confronting defiance, addressing disobedience, and dealing with rebellion. According to the psalmist, God gives us each child as “a gift,”—not as a challenge. In fact, “the fruit of the womb is a reward”—not a problem (Psalm 127:3). While parents need to stand firm on issues that call for a strong hand, disciplining children must never eclipse delighting in them! Woven throughout the fabric of Scripture are numerous words and statements underscoring the importance of not only expressing but also demonstrating affirmation, encouragement, gentleness, fun, tenderness, and affection. Let’s turn our attention to those all-important attitudes and actions that bring joy and build esteem as we cultivate an atmosphere of harmony and pleasure in the home.

Listen

Delighting in Your Children, Part 1 - Wednesday, March 22, 2017
We have spent quite a bit of time focusing on the demanding and difficult challenges of rearing children: acknowledging depravity, confronting defiance, addressing disobedience, and dealing with rebellion. According to the psalmist, God gives us each child as “a gift,”—not as a challenge. In fact, “the fruit of the womb is a reward”—not a problem (Psalm 127:3). While parents need to stand firm on issues that call for a strong hand, disciplining children must never eclipse delighting in them! Woven throughout the fabric of Scripture are numerous words and statements underscoring the importance of not only expressing but also demonstrating affirmation, encouragement, gentleness, fun, tenderness, and affection. Let’s turn our attention to those all-important attitudes and actions that bring joy and build esteem as we cultivate an atmosphere of harmony and pleasure in the home.
Shaping the Will with Wisdom, Part 3 - Tuesday, March 21, 2017
Being a parent is one of life’s most delightful and rewarding experiences. At the same time, it can be one of life’s most exasperating and demanding challenges. It works best when we are loving and understanding during our children’s growing-up years, when we are consistent and calm in our reactions, and when we are wise and mature in our actions and attitudes. But who on earth does all of that? We may be parents who are grateful for our children, but we’re still 100 percent human. This means we are sinful, stressed-out people who are often too busy, too impatient, too quick to jump to conclusions, and too extreme in our reactions. The last thing healthy parents want is to hurt and discourage those they love so much. But we also know that standing firm is a necessary part of training, which means our love must sometimes be “tough love,” and our actions must sometimes be strong and unbending. After all, we’re dealing with children who must one day discipline and restrain themselves. They learn how to do that from parents who discipline them for wrongdoing and restrain them from defiance and rebellion. Simply put, we must learn how to shape each child’s will with wisdom.
Shaping the Will with Wisdom, Part 2 - Monday, March 20, 2017
Being a parent is one of life’s most delightful and rewarding experiences. At the same time, it can be one of life’s most exasperating and demanding challenges. It works best when we are loving and understanding during our children’s growing-up years, when we are consistent and calm in our reactions, and when we are wise and mature in our actions and attitudes. But who on earth does all of that? We may be parents who are grateful for our children, but we’re still 100 percent human. This means we are sinful, stressed-out people who are often too busy, too impatient, too quick to jump to conclusions, and too extreme in our reactions. The last thing healthy parents want is to hurt and discourage those they love so much. But we also know that standing firm is a necessary part of training, which means our love must sometimes be “tough love,” and our actions must sometimes be strong and unbending. After all, we’re dealing with children who must one day discipline and restrain themselves. They learn how to do that from parents who discipline them for wrongdoing and restrain them from defiance and rebellion. Simply put, we must learn how to shape each child’s will with wisdom.
Shaping the Will with Wisdom, Part 1 - Friday, March 17, 2017
Being a parent is one of life’s most delightful and rewarding experiences. At the same time, it can be one of life’s most exasperating and demanding challenges. It works best when we are loving and understanding during our children’s growing-up years, when we are consistent and calm in our reactions, and when we are wise and mature in our actions and attitudes. But who on earth does all of that? We may be parents who are grateful for our children, but we’re still 100 percent human. This means we are sinful, stressed-out people who are often too busy, too impatient, too quick to jump to conclusions, and too extreme in our reactions. The last thing healthy parents want is to hurt and discourage those they love so much. But we also know that standing firm is a necessary part of training, which means our love must sometimes be “tough love,” and our actions must sometimes be strong and unbending. After all, we’re dealing with children who must one day discipline and restrain themselves. They learn how to do that from parents who discipline them for wrongdoing and restrain them from defiance and rebellion. Simply put, we must learn how to shape each child’s will with wisdom.
Unpacking Our "Ancestral Baggage", Part 3 - Thursday, March 16, 2017
“Tell me about your parents and your family.” This question is asked by diagnostic physicians who are doing a workup on our physical health. It’s also a question asked by psychologists as they assist us in understanding our mental and emotional battles. The same question also needs to be asked of couples planning to marry and by pastors who counsel parishioners struggling to find solutions to long-standing, troubling habits that are detrimental to their walk with Christ. All of us must admit that there is a direct linkage between the people we have become and the lives of those who formed our heritage—for good and for ill. In light of all this, it should not come as a surprise to parents who desire to know their children fully that tracing their way back through ancestral roots is important. This helps us understand why certain character traits remain so deeply embedded in our offspring. We know that as a whole we are all sinful and in need of salvation. But we often fail to consider that our child bears the specific “bents” of his or her father, grandfather, and even great-grandfather.
Unpacking Our "Ancestral Baggage", Part 2 - Wednesday, March 15, 2017
“Tell me about your parents and your family.” This question is asked by diagnostic physicians who are doing a workup on our physical health. It’s also a question asked by psychologists as they assist us in understanding our mental and emotional battles. The same question also needs to be asked of couples planning to marry and by pastors who counsel parishioners struggling to find solutions to long-standing, troubling habits that are detrimental to their walk with Christ. All of us must admit that there is a direct linkage between the people we have become and the lives of those who formed our heritage—for good and for ill. In light of all this, it should not come as a surprise to parents who desire to know their children fully that tracing their way back through ancestral roots is important. This helps us understand why certain character traits remain so deeply embedded in our offspring. We know that as a whole we are all sinful and in need of salvation. But we often fail to consider that our child bears the specific “bents” of his or her father, grandfather, and even great-grandfather.
Unpacking Our "Ancestral Baggage", Part 1 - Tuesday, March 14, 2017
“Tell me about your parents and your family.” This question is asked by diagnostic physicians who are doing a workup on our physical health. It’s also a question asked by psychologists as they assist us in understanding our mental and emotional battles. The same question also needs to be asked of couples planning to marry and by pastors who counsel parishioners struggling to find solutions to long-standing, troubling habits that are detrimental to their walk with Christ. All of us must admit that there is a direct linkage between the people we have become and the lives of those who formed our heritage—for good and for ill. In light of all this, it should not come as a surprise to parents who desire to know their children fully that tracing their way back through ancestral roots is important. This helps us understand why certain character traits remain so deeply embedded in our offspring. We know that as a whole we are all sinful and in need of salvation. But we often fail to consider that our child bears the specific “bents” of his or her father, grandfather, and even great-grandfather.
Straightening Granddad's Bent, Part 3 - Monday, March 13, 2017
All of us have heard the following statement, which is usually said in disgust, “You’re just like your father/mother!” In other settings, we’ve repeated the saying, “The acorn doesn’t fall far from the tree.” Are those merely throwaway words, or could there be some truth in them? We acknowledge that, being human, we are sinful people—sinners by nature, through choice, and from birth. We learned last time that we were born with the same sinful nature that characterized our parents (Psalm 51:5) and that we “go astray from birth (58:3).” The prophet Isaiah states, “you have been called a rebel from birth (Isaiah 48:8).” But is our sinful condition only ours, or do we, in fact, inherit some of the sinful traits that our parents or our grandparents (perhaps, even our great­-grandparents) had? Can we trace certain acts of iniquity back to our ancestors? The answer is yes. While it may be disturbing, we’re going to discover from the Scriptures that there are generational links to acts of iniquity. These lingering “bents” do not stop with the deaths of our ancestors. Wise are the parents who understand this, observe the reality of it in their own children, and then appropriately deal with it to bring an end to longstanding familial iniquity.
Strengthening Granddad's Bent, Part 2 - Friday, March 10, 2017
All of us have heard the following statement, which is usually said in disgust, “You’re just like your father/mother!” In other settings, we’ve repeated the saying, “The acorn doesn’t fall far from the tree.” Are those merely throwaway words, or could there be some truth in them? We acknowledge that, being human, we are sinful people—sinners by nature, through choice, and from birth. We learned last time that we were born with the same sinful nature that characterized our parents (Psalm 51:5) and that we “go astray from birth (58:3).” The prophet Isaiah states, “you have been called a rebel from birth (Isaiah 48:8).” But is our sinful condition only ours, or do we, in fact, inherit some of the sinful traits that our parents or our grandparents (perhaps, even our great­-grandparents) had? Can we trace certain acts of iniquity back to our ancestors? The answer is yes. While it may be disturbing, we’re going to discover from the Scriptures that there are generational links to acts of iniquity. These lingering “bents” do not stop with the deaths of our ancestors. Wise are the parents who understand this, observe the reality of it in their own children, and then appropriately deal with it to bring an end to longstanding familial iniquity.

Lectionary Calendar
Thursday, March 23rd, 2017
the Third Week of Lent
There are 24 days til Easter!
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