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Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

Jude 1

 

 

Verse 3

Verse 3

Once; formerly; or, it may be, once for all, meaning that the revelation thus made is permanent, not to be changed for any new system yet to come.

Verse 4

Verse 4

Before of old ordained to this condemnation. Nothing in the Scriptures of the New Testament is more remarkable than the readiness with which the minds of the inspired founders of Christianity, when speaking of the most extreme and aggravated of human sins, or of the deepest injuries inflicted upon the cause of Christ, by human instrumentality, at once recur to the thought of the all-controlling superintendence of God, which they represent as including and covering all human events and transactions whatsoever. Jesus speaking of his betrayal by Judas, (Mark 14:21,) the disciples describing the crucifixion of the Savior, (Acts 4:28,) and now Jude called to testify against the most alarming indications of an internal corruption in the church, are very striking instances. While they fully appreciated the enormity of these sins, they never admitted the idea that any human guilt could be an unlooked-for contingency, interfering with and thwarting unexpectedly the divine designs,--or that any sinner, in his greatest excesses of crime, could really have broken away from the control of that hand by which they regarded the whole moral world as invariably and every where governed.

 

 

Verse 6

Verse 6

Compare 2 Peter 2:4.

 

 

Verse 7

Verse 7

And the cities about them; Admah and Zeboim are named in Deuteronomy 29:23.--Going after strange flesh; abandoning themselves to unnatural and enormous sins.

 

 

Verse 8

Verse 8

These filthy dreamers; the corrupt teachers who are referred to Judee 1:4.

 

 

Verse 9

Verse 9

As there are no accounts in the books of the Old Testament to which the allusions in this verse can be supposed to relate, it is thought by many that the writer refers in them to traditional accounts which came down to his times; or else to writings which then existed, but have since been lost. In respect to the body of Moses, see Deuteronomy 34:6.

 

 

Verse 11

Verse 11

The gainsaying; the sedition.--Core; Korah. (Numbers 16:1-50:)

Verse 14

Verse 14

Enoch. There is no prophecy of Enoch extant in the Old Testament,--nor is any thing certain known of the writing ere referred to. There is a book purporting to be the Book of Enoch, but it is generally considered spurious.

Verse 22

Verse 22

Have compassion; treat them gently and tenderly.

Verse 23

Verse 23

With fear; with the utmost urgency.--The garment spotted by the flesh; the least touch or contamination of evil.

 

 


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These files are public domain.

Bibliography Information
Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on Jude 1:1". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". "http://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/view.cgi?book=jude&chapter=001". 1878.

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