corner graphic   Hi,    
ver. 2.0.19.10.14
Finding the new version too difficult to understand? Go to classic.studylight.org/

Bible Commentaries

Gary H. Everett's Study Notes on the Holy Scriptures
3 John

Chapter 1

Book Overview - 3 John

by Gary H. Everett

STUDY NOTES ON THE HOLY SCRIPTURES

Using a Theme-based Approach

to Identify Literary Structures

By Gary H. Everett

THE EPISTLE OF 3JOHN

January 2013Edition

All Scripture quotations in English are taken from the King James Version unless otherwise noted. Some words have been emphasized by the author of this commentary using bold or italics.

All Old Testament Scripture quotations in the Hebrew text are taken from Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia: With Westminster Hebrew Morphology, electronic ed, Stuttgart; Glenside PA: German Bible Society, Westminster Seminary, 1996, c 1925, morphology c 1991, in Libronix Digital Library System, v 21c [CD-ROM] Bellingham, WA: Libronix Corp, 2000-2004.

All New Testament Scripture quotations in the Greek text are taken from Greek New Testament, Fourth Revised Edition (with Morphology), eds. Kurt Aland, Matthew Black, Carlo M. Martini, Bruce M. Metzger, M. Robinson, and Allen Wikgren, Stuttgart: Deutsche Bibelgesellschaft (United Bible Societies), c 1966, 1993, 2006, in Libronix Digital Library System, v 21c [CD-ROM] Bellingham, WA: Libronix Corp, 2000-2004.

All Hebrew and Greek text for word studies are taken from James Strong in The New Strong"s Dictionary of Hebrew and Greek Words, Nashville: Thomas Nelson, c 1996, 1997, in Libronix Digital Library System, v 21c [CD-ROM] Bellingham, WA: Libronix Corp, 2000-2004.

The Crucifixion image on the book cover was created by the author's daughter Victoria Everett in 2012.

Gary H. Everett, 1981-2013

All rights reserved. No part of this work may be reproduced, stored, or transmitted in any form without prior permission of the author.

Foundational Theme - The Perseverance of the Saints (from False Doctrines within)

Then Jesus said unto them, Take heed and

beware of the leaven of the Pharisees and of the Sadducees.

Matthew 16:6

Structural Theme - Jesus Christ Our Advocate Brings Us into Fellowship with the Father

My little children, these things write I unto you, that ye sin not.

And if any man sin, we have an advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous:

1 John 2:1

Imperative Theme - Walking in the Truth With Genuine Believers Results in Health & Prosperity

(Perseverance of the Heart)

Beloved, I wish above all things that thou mayest prosper and be in health,

even as thy soul prospereth.

3 John 1:2

I have no greater joy than to hear that my children walk in truth.

3 John 1:4

INTRODUCTION TO THE EPISTLE OF 3JOHN

Study Notes on the Holy Scriptures supports the view of the verbal, plenary inspiration of the biblical text of the Holy Scriptures, meaning that every word originally written down by the authors in the sixty-six books of the Holy Canon were God-breathed when recorded by men, and that the Scriptures are therefore inerrant and infallible. Any view less than this contradicts the testimony of the Holy Scriptures themselves. For this reason, the Holy Scriptures contain both divine attributes and human attributes. While textual criticism engages with the variant readings of the biblical text, acknowledging its human attributes, faith in His Word acknowledges its divine attributes. These views demand the adherence of mankind to the supreme authority of the Holy Scriptures above all else. The Holy Scriptures can only be properly interpreted by the guidance of the Holy Spirit, an aspect of biblical scholarship that is denied by liberal views, causing much misunderstanding and misinterpretation of the Holy Scriptures.

The Message of the Epistle of 3John- Donald Guthrie tells us that, with the exception of 1Peter and 1John, the Catholic Epistles played a minor role in shaping the thought of the early Church during the first few centuries, and were not fully embraced until the fourth century, when the New Testament canon was closed. 1] These Epistles are often overshadowed by the Gospels and Pauline Epistles in their relative importance to the Christian faith. This appears to be the case today as well as in in the ancient Church. Because their underlying message is one of perseverance, we can understand why the other New Testament writings appear more glorious, as they emphasize the revelations of our glorious Saviour and of sacred Church doctrine. However, the necessity to persevere is part and parcel to our eternal glorification, as is clearly brought out within the Catholic Epistles. This means that their message is an equally important part of our spiritual journey into eternal glory with our Heavenly Father.

1] Donald Guthrie, New Testament Introduction (Downers Grover, Illinois: Intervarsity Press, 1990), 722.

The epistle of 3John is the shortest book in the Holy Bible, with only two hundred nineteen (219) Greek words. It was probably the last writing of John and the last writing to find its way into the New Testament canon, along with 2John. It was obviously written upon a single piece of papyrus.

Introductory Material- The introduction to the epistle of 3John will deal with its historical setting, literary style, and theological framework. 2] These three aspects of introductory material will serve as an important foundation for understanding God's message to us today from this divinely inspired book of the Holy Scriptures.

2] Someone may associate these three categories with Hermann Gunkel's well-known three-fold approach to form criticism when categorizing the genre found within the book of Psalm: (1) "a common setting in life," (2) "thoughts and mood," (3) "literary forms." In addition, the Word Biblical Commentary uses "Form/Structure/Setting" preceding each commentary section. Although such similarities were not intentional, but rather coincidental, the author was aware of them and found encouragement from them when assigning the three-fold scheme of historical setting, literary style, and theological framework to his introductory material. See Hermann Gunkel, The Psalm: A Form-Critical Introduction, trans. Thomas M. Horner, in Biblical Series, vol 19, ed. John Reumann (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Fortress Press, 1967), 10; see also Word Biblical Commentary, eds. Bruce M. Metzger, David A. Hubbard, and Glenn W. Barker (Dallas, Texas: Word Incorporated, 1989-2007).

HISTORICAL SETTING

"We dare not divorce our study from understanding the historical setting of every passage of Scripture

if we are going to come to grips with the truth and message of the Bible."

(J. Hampton Keathley) 3]

3] J. Hampton Keathley, III, "Introduction and Historical Setting for Elijah," (Bible.org) [on-line]; accessed 23May 2012; available from http://bible.org/seriespage/introduction-and-historical-setting-elijah; Internet.

Each book of the Holy Scriptures is cloaked within a unique historical setting. An examination of this setting is useful in the interpretation of the book because it provides the context of the passage of Scripture under examination. The section on the historical setting of the epistle of 3John address its historical background, authorship, date and place of writing, recipients, and occasion. This discussion supports the early Church tradition that the apostle John wrote his first epistle from Ephesus towards the end of the first century to a dear and beloved fellow Christian named Gaius who had performed the noble task of receiving the brethren.

I. Historical Background

Church history tells us that John the apostle moved to Asia Minor, probably Ephesus, at some point after the death of Mary the mother of our Lord. There is no record of when John the apostle moved from Jerusalem to Asia Minor and the city of Ephesus. Philip Schaff says that it was probably not before the death of Paul around A.D 63, since there are no references to John in Paul"s letters to his churches in Asia Minor. He supposes that the death of Paul and Peter in Rome would have urged John to take charge of these churches. 4] Since Ephesus was the capital of that region of the Roman Empire, it would have been the choice city to take up residence in order to manage nearby churches. Therefore, it is most likely that he moved to Ephesus in the 60's. Perhaps his move was also encouraged by the Jewish War of A.D 66-70, which would have made Judea a very dangerous place to live.

4] Philip Schaff, History of the Christian Church, vol 1 (Grand Rapids, Michigan: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 1955), 424-425.

The city of Ephesus served both as the economic center of this region and as the center of church leadership over the churches that Paul the apostle established in this region. During John's stay there he was banished to the island of Patmos during the latter part of the reign of Domitian, who ruled Rome from A.D 81to 96. After the death of this Roman emperor John was freed and returned to Ephesus where he lived until his death.

We see in the Revelation of John a reference to the churches of Asia Minor. Jesus appears to John and gives him messages for seven churches. The fact that Jesus would give these messages to John , and not another, to deliver to the seven churches is a likely indication that John was overseeing these churches. We see from 2,3John that he was called "the Elder", which suggests an honorary title describing his leadership role in this region. It is within this context that John writes his three epistles that we find in the New Testament.

II. Authorship and Canonicity

In establishing the authorship of the New Testament writings, one must also deal with the issue of canonicity, since apostolic authority was the primary condition for a book to be accepted into the biblical canon of the early Church. This section will evaluate three phases in the development of the canonicity of the epistle of 3John: apostolic authority, church orthodoxy, and catholicity. The first phase of canonization is called apostolic authority and is characterized by the use of the writings of the apostles by the earliest Church father in the defense of the Christian faith (1st and 2nd centuries). The second phase of canonization is called church orthodoxy and is characterized by the collection of the apostolic writings into the distinctive groups of the Gospels, the Pauline epistles, and the Catholic epistles, and their distribution among the churches as the rules of the Christian faith (late 2nd century thru 3rd century). The third phase of canonization is characterized by the general acceptance and use of the books of the New Testament by the catholic church, seen most distinctly in the early Church councils (4th century).

A. Apostolic Authority- Scholars generally agree that the New Testament canon went through several phrases of development in Church history prior to its solidification in the fourth century. F. B. Westcott says the earliest phase is considered the apostolic age in which "the writings of the Apostles were regarded from the first as invested with singular authority, as the true expression, if not the original source, of Christian doctrine and Christian practice." He says the "elements of the Catholic faith" were established during this period in Church history. 5] At this time, the early Christian Greek apologists defended the catholic faith during the rise of the heresies of the second century using the writings that carried the weight of apostolic authority. The Church clung to the books that were either written by the apostles themselves, such as Matthew ,, John , Peter, and Paul, or directly sanctioned by them, such as Mark and Luke , the assistances of Peter and Paul respectively, and the epistles of James and Jude , the brothers of the Lord Jesus Christ. Thus, scholars believe apostolic authority was the primary element in selecting the canonical books. This phase is best represented by evaluating the internal evidence of the authorship of these New Testament books and by the external witnesses of the early Church fathers who declare the book's apostolic authorship and doctrinal authority over the Church.

5] Brooke Foss Westcott, A General History of the Canon of the New Testament (London: Macmillan and Co, 1875), 21. The Muratorian Canon (c. A.D 200) alludes to the criteria of apostolic authority for the New Testament writings, saying, "The Pastor, moreover, did Hermas write very recently in our times in the city of Rome, while his brother bishop Pius sat in the chair of the Church of Rome. And therefore it also ought to be read; but it cannot be made public in the Church to the people, nor placed among the prophets, as their number is complete, nor among the apostles to the end of time." (Fragments of Caius 33) (ANF 5); Corey Keating says, "In the first two centuries, ‘apostolic authority' was the important factor in deciding to keep or reject a particular writing." See Corey Keating, The Criteria Used for Developing the New Testament Canon in the First Four Centuries of the Christian Church (2000); accessed 15 April 2012; available from http://www.ntgreek.org/SeminaryPapers/ChurchHistory/Criteria%20for%20Development%20of%20the%20NT%20Canon%20in%20First%20Four%20Centuries.pdf; Internet.

Five of the General Epistles ( James ,, 2 Peter , 2, 3 John , and Jude) were slow in being received into the New Testament canon by the early Church for several reasons. 6] (1) Slow Circulation- One of the reasons for their delayed acceptance was slow circulation. James MacKnight says this slow circulation does not mean that they were viewed as forgeries by the early Church fathers; rather, it shows that slow circulation of these epistles had not allowed them to be as quickly judged and proven authentic. 7] The New Testament church was extremely careful before accepting any book as canonical, and did in fact identify certain writings as forgeries. (2) Brevity- Another reason the epistles of James ,, 2 Peter ,, 2 John ,, 3 John , and Jude were not quickly recognized by the early Church was the brevity of these letters. This brevity gave them less attention during public readings, since they were not immediately recognized as circulatory letters. This circumstance accounts for both their slow circulation and for them being omitted from some of the earliest translations of the Christian Scriptures and canons. Because of their slower circulation and brevity, they were much less referred to by the earliest church fathers, making it more difficult to establish their genuineness. F.B. Westcott responds to this fact by saying, "As a general rule, quotations have a value positively, but not negatively: they may shew that a writing was received as authoritative, but it cannot fairly be argued from this fact alone that another which is not quoted was unknown or rejected as apocryphal." 8] Despite their slow circulation and brevity, the Church's acceptance of apostolic authorship of these five epistles won them favor by the time the canon was officially closed in the fourth century.

6] Eusebius says, "Among the disputed writings, which are nevertheless recognized by many, are extant the Song of Solomon -called epistle of James and that of Jude , also the second epistle of Peter, and those that are called the second and third of John , whether they belong to the evangelist or to another person of the same name." (Ecclesiastical History 3253)

7] James MacKnight, A New Literal Translation from the Original Greek, of All the Apostolic Epistles, vol. iv (Edinburgh: John Ritchie, 1809), 5-6.

8] B. F. Westcott, A General Survey of the History of the Canon of the New Testament (London: Macmillian and Company, Ltd,1896), 11.

The author of the second and third epistles of John describes himself as "the elder". As to his identity, both internal and external evidence supports John the Apostle as the author of these epistles.

1. Internal Evidence- There is enough internal evidence within this short epistle to support Johannine authorship.

a) Similar Writing Style and Content of Other Johannine Literature - The second and third epistles of John are linked to his Gospel and first epistle by vocabulary and general subject matter. They use much of the same Greek words and phrases as well as themes that are found in his other writings.

i) The fact that John does not affix his name to 2,3John is in agreement with his other epistles and his Gospel. This fact strengthens, rather than weakens, the argument for Johannine authorship. Paul, Peter, James , and Jude affixed their names to the epistles they wrote. Instead, John uses the title of "elder," which reflects John's position of overseer of the churches in Asia Minor during his later years.

ii) The word "truth" is used ten times in the First Epistle, four times in the Second Epistle and six times in the Third Epistle. Other words and phrases such as "filled with joy," "antichrist," "walk," and "love the commandment" distinguish these three epistles with similar authorship.

iii) The harshness found in 3 John 1:9-10 is similar to the tone of 2 John 1:10. A careful study of John's character reveals that he was kind and gentle, as well as ready to implore judgment when necessary. His zeal for doing what is right is seen in several passages, when he asks Jesus to forbid others from casting out devils, or to call fire down from heaven.

Mark 9:38, "And John answered him, saying, Master, we saw one casting out devils in thy name, and he followeth not us: and we forbad him, because he followeth not us."

Luke 9:54, "And when his disciples James and John saw this, they said, Lord, wilt thou that we command fire to come down from heaven, and consume them, even as Elias did?"

Jesus surnamed him and his brother "Boanerges, the sons of thunder" as a reflection of their character.

Mark 3:17, "And James the son of Zebedee, and John the brother of James; and he surnamed them Boanerges, which Isaiah , The sons of thunder:"

iv) Both 2,3John rejoice over the recipients for walking in the truth ( 2 John 1:4 and 3 John 1:3) in the atmosphere of false teachings.

v) Both 2,3John speak of hospitality for those who walk in the truth and warn against partaking with those who walk against the truth.

vi) Both 2,3John speak of the author's intent on visiting the recipients ( 2 John 1:12 and 3 John 1:14) instead of writing them with further instructions ( 2 John 1:12 and 3 John 1:13).

vii) All three of John's epistles reflect a clear division between those who love God and those who do not know God.

In summary, commenting on the authorship of John's writings, B. H. Streeter said, "The three Epistles and the Gospel of John are so closely allied in diction, style, and general outlook that the burden of proof lies with the person who would deny their common authorship." 9]

9] B. H. Streeter, The Four Gospels, rev. ed. (London: Macmillan, 1930), 460. Cited by Daniel B. Wallace, "1John: Introduction, Argument, and Outline," (Biblical Studies Foundation, Richardson, Texas) [on-line]; accessed 15 September 2010; available from http://bible.org/seriespage/1- John -introduction-argument-and-outline; Internet.

b) Other Scripture References- The first epistle of John makes a reference to other letters that he wrote. The verse in 1 John 2:26 may very well be referring to the epistles of second and third John.

1 John 2:26, "These things have I written unto you concerning them that seduce you."

2. Patristic Support of Johannine Authorship- While the early Church fathers clearly accept John the apostle as the author of the Gospel of John , the Apocalypse, and the First Epistle of John , they did not all necessarily believe that John wrote the second and third epistles. One fact that caused this uncertainty is the brevity of these two letters. This brevity gave them less attention during public readings, since they were not immediately recognized as circulatory letters. This circumstance accounts for their slow circulation and for them being omitted from some of the earliest translations of the Christian Scriptures and canons. Because of their slower circulation, they were much less referred to by the earliest Church fathers, making it more difficult to establish their genuineness. Apostolic authorship won their favor by the time the canon was officially closed.

a) The Muratorian Canon (late 2nd Century) - The Muratorian Canon, an ancient Latin document dated around A.D 200, is considered the earliest attempt at listing the canonical books of the New Testament. It was discovered in Ambrosian Library in Milan and formerly in the monastery of Bobbio. 10] It quotes from the opening verse of 1John as a credit to John's authorship.

10] "Muratorian Canon," in The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church, revised, eds. F. L. Cross and E. A. Livingstone (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1983), 950; Brooke Foss Westcott, A General Survey of the History of the Canon of the New Testament, fourth edition (London: Macmillan and Co, 1875), 530-531.

"What marvel is it, then, that John brings forward these several things so constantly in his epistles also, saying in his own person, "What we have seen with our eyes, and heard with our ears, and our hands have handled, that have we written." For thus he professes himself to be not only the eye-witness, but also the hearer; and besides that, the historian of all the wondrous facts concerning the Lord in their order." (Fragments of Caius 3: Canon Muratorianus 1) (ANF 5)

The Muratorian Canon then makes a brief reference to two epistles of John that were accepted as canon, but which two of his three epistles is not made clear.

"The Epistle of Jude , indeed, and two belonging to the above-named John—or bearing the name of John—are reckoned among the Catholic epistles. And the book of Wisdom of Solomon , written by the friends of Solomon in his honour. We receive also the Apocalypse of John and that of Peter, though some amongst us will not have this latter read in the Church." (Fragments of Caius 3: Canon Muratorianus 4) (ANF 5)

b) Irenaeus (A.D 130 to 200) - Irenaeus quotes from 2 John 1:11 and calls it the words of " John , the disciple of the Lord."

"And John , the disciple of the Lord, has intensified their condemnation, when he desires us not even to address to them the salutation of ‘good-speed;' for, says Hebrews , ‘He that bids them be of good-speed is a partaker with their evil deeds;' and that with reason, ‘for there is no good-speed to the ungodly,' saith the Lord." (Against Heresies 1163)

c) Clement of Alexandria (A.D 150 to 215) - The churches in Alexandria, Egypt seemed to be familiar with these writings. We find two bishops, Clement, bishop of Alexandria, and Alexander, bishop of Alexandria, quote from these two epistles, while Dionysius of Alexandria says that he was acquainted with them. Clement of Alexandria, the theologian, states that he was familiar with more than one epistle of John.

" John , too, manifestly teaches the differences of sins, in his larger Epistle, in these words: ‘If any man see his brother sin a sin that is not unto death, he shall ask, and he shall give him life: for these that sin not unto death,' he says. For ‘there is a sin unto death: I do not say that one is to pray for it. All unrighteousness is sin; and there is a sin not unto death.'" (The Stromata 21566)

Eusebius tells us that Clement of Alexandria commented on all of the disputed books, which would have included 2,3John.

"To sum up briefly, he has given in the Hypotyposes abridged accounts of all canonical Scripture, not omitting the disputed books, -- I refer to Jude and the other Catholic epistles, and Barnabas and the Song of Solomon -called Apocalypse of Peter." (Ecclesiastical History 16141)

d) Origen (A.D 185 to 256) - Origen, the Alexandrian theologian, is quoted by Eusebius as telling us that the authorship of John"s first epistle was believed to be John the Apostle. He goes on to say that John"s authorship of the second and third epistles was questioned. Although these two epistles were in dispute, this quote implies that Origen himself believed in John's authorship of 2,3John.

"Why need we speak of him who reclined upon the bosom of Jesus, John , who has left us one Gospel, though he confessed that he might write so many that the world could not contain them? And he wrote also the Apocalypse, but was commanded to keep silence and not to write the words of the seven thunders. He has left also an epistle of very few lines; perhaps also a second and third; but not all consider them genuine, and together they do not contain hundred lines." (Origen's Commentary on the Gospel of John 5:3) and (Eusebius, Ecclesiastical History 6259-10)

e) Dionysius the Great (died A.D 264) - Dionysius, bishop of Alexandria, and a pupil of Origen, is quoted by Eusebius, implying John's authorship of his second and third epistle.

"But neither in the reputed second or third epistle of John , though they are very short, does the name John appear; but there is written the anonymous phrase, "the elder."" (Ecclesiastical History 72511)

f) Aurelius, the bishop of Chullabi (fl. A.D 256) - Cyprian refers to Aurelius, the bishop of Chullabi, where he quotes 2 John 1:10. This implies that the epistles of John were considered apostolic in North Africa.

"Also another Aurelius of Chullabi said: John the apostle laid it down in his epistle, saying: ‘If any one come unto you, and have not the doctrine of Christ, receive him not into your house, and say not to him, Hail. For he that saith to him, Hail, partakes with his evil deeds.'" (Cyprian, The Seventh Council of Carthage Under Cyprian - Concerning the Baptism of Heretics)

g) Eusebius (A.D 260 to 340) - Eusebius, the ancient Church historian, tells us that although the early Church fathers without dispute attribute the authorship of the Gospel of John and the first epistle to John the apostle, the authorship of his second and third epistles were in dispute from earliest times. Note:

"But of the writings of John , not only his Gospel, but also the former of his epistles, has been accepted without dispute both now and in ancient times. But the other two are disputed." (Ecclesiastical History 32417)

Eusebius also tells us that the early Church fathers listed the epistles of 2,3John as some of the disputed writings of the New Testament.

"Among the disputed writings, which are nevertheless recognized by many, are extant the Song of Solomon -called epistle of James and that of Jude , also the second epistle of Peter, and those that are called the second and third of John, whether they belong to the evangelist or to another person of the same name." (Ecclesiastical History 3253)

h) Athanasius (A.D 296 to 373) - Athanasius, the bishop of Alexandria, supported Johannine authorship of all three of his epistles.

"Again it is not tedious to speak of the [books] of the New Testament. These are, the four Gospels, according to Matthew ,, Mark ,, Luke , and John. Afterwards, the Acts of the Apostles and Epistles (called Catholic), seven, viz. of James , one; of Peter, two; of John , three; after these, one of Jude. In addition, there are fourteen Epistles of Paul, written in this order. The first, to the Romans; then two to the Corinthians; after these, to the Galatians; next, to the Ephesians; then to the Philippians; then to the Colossians; after these, two to the Thessalonians, and that to the Hebrews; and again, two to Timothy; one to Titus; and lastly, that to Philemon. And besides, the Revelation of John" (Letters 395)

i) The Syriac Church - Nathaniel Lardner cites Mill, who says Ephraem Syrus (c. A.D 306 to 373), the Syrian biblical exegete and ecclesiastical writer, makes quotations from the epistles of James ,, 2 Peter ,, Jude , and 2John on numerous occasions. 11] However, Albert Barnes says an old Syriac version from the sixth century does not include the epistles of 2Peter, 2 John ,, 3 John , or Jude , showing that their place in the Scriptures was still in dispute in the Syrian church. 12] JFB says, "Cosmas Indicopleustes in the sixth century says that in his time the Syriac Church only acknowledged three of the Catholic Epistles, First Peter, First John , and James." 13]

11] The Works of Nathaniel Lardner, vol 4 (London: Joseph Ogle Robinson, 1829), 311-312.

12] Albert Barnes, The Second Epistle of John , in Barnes" Notes, Electronic Database (Seattle, WA: Hendrickson Publishers Inc, 1997), in P.C. Study Bible, v 31 [CD-ROM] (Seattle, WA: Biblesoft Inc, 1993-2000), "Introduction."

13] Robert Jamieson, A. R. Fausset, and David Brown. The Second and Third Epistles General of John , in Jamieson, Fausset, and Brown Commentary, Electronic Database (Seattle, WA: Hendrickson Publishers Inc, 1997), in P.C. Study Bible, v 31 [CD-ROM] (Seattle, WA: Biblesoft Inc, 1993-2000), "Introduction."

j) Cyril of Jerusalem (c. A.D 315 to 386) - Cyril of Jerusalem names all seven Catholic epistles as canonical in his catalogue of New Testament books.

"Then of the New Testament there are the four Gospels only, for the rest have false titles and are mischievous. The Manichaeans also wrote a Gospel according to Thomas, which being tinctured with the fragrance of the evangelic title corrupts the souls of the simple sort. Receive also the Acts of the Twelve Apostles; and in addition to these the seven Catholic Epistles of James , Peter, John , and Jude; and as a seal upon them all, and the last work of the disciples, the fourteen Epistles of Paul. But let all the rest be put aside in a secondary rank. And whatever books are not read in Churches, these read not even by thyself, as thou hast heard me say. Thus much of these subjects." (Catechetical Lectures 436)

k) Gregory Nazianzen (A.D 329 to 389) - Gregory Naziansen, the Church theologian, credits John with three Catholic epistles. He says after listing the books of the Old Testament canon, "And already for me, I have received all those of the New Testament. First, to the Hebrews Matthew the saint composed what was according to him the Gospel; second, in Italy Mark the divine; third, in Achaia Luke the all-wise; and John , thundering the heavenlies, indeed preached to all common men; after whom the miracles and deeds of the wise apostles, and Paul the divine herald fourteen epistles; and catholic seven, of which one is of James the brother of God, and two are of Peter the head, and of John again the evangelist, three, and seventh is Jude the Zealot. All are united and accepted; and if one of them is found outside, it is not placed among the genuine ones." (PG 38, Colossians 845) (author's translation) 14]

14] Cited by Philip Schaff, History of the Christian Church, vol 1: Apostolic Christianity A.D 1-100 (Grand Rapids, Michigan: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 1955), 582.

He makes a similar statement again:

"Indeed Matthew wrote to the Hebrews (the) miracles of Christ, and Mark to Italy, Luke to Achaia, and above all, John , a great preacher who walked in heaven, then the Acts of the wise apostles, and fourteen epistles of Paul, and seven catholic epistles, being of James , one, and two of Peter, and three of John again, and Jude is seven. You have all. And if there is some (other than) these seven, not (are they) among the genuine ones." (Carminum 1) (PG 37 Colossians 474) (author's translation)

l) Jerome (A.D 342to 420) - Jerome tells us that the second and third epistles are said to be the works of another John , one called John the Presbyter, or the Elder, being a different person from John the Apostle.

"The other two of which the first is "The eider to the elect lady and her children" and the other "The elder unto Gaius the beloved whom I love in truth," are said to be the work of John the presbyter to the memory of whom another sepulchre is shown at Ephesus to the present day, though some think that there are two memorials of this same John the evangelist." (Lives of Illustrious Men 9)

Jerome calls the seven catholic epistles "canonical."

Jerome says, "…seven epistles which are called canonical…one James , Peter two, John three, and Jude one…" (Prologue to the Seven Canonical Epistles) (PL 29 cols 821-825) (author's translation)

m) Augustine (A.D 354-430) - Augustine named the second and third epistles of John as authentic books of the New Testament canon.

"That of the New Testament, again, is contained within the following:—Four books of the Gospel, according to Matthew , according to Mark , according to Luke , according to John; fourteen epistles of the Apostle Paul—one to the Romans , two to the Corinthians, one to the Galatians , to the Ephesians , to the Philippians , two to the Thessalonians, one to the Colossians , two to Timothy, one to Titus , to Philemon , to the Hebrews: two of Peter; three of John; one of Jude; and one of James; one book of the Acts of the Apostles; and one of the Revelation of John." (On Christian Doctrine 213) (NPF 1 2)

n) Sophronius (A.D 560 to 638) - Sophronius, patriarch of Jerusalem, confirms John as the author of his first epistle, and mentions the dispute over his authorship of the other two epistles.

"John also wrote an epistle, which begins, That which was from the beginning. This epistle is accepted as John's by all ecclesiastical and scholarly authorities. The other two epistles bearing his name—the first, beginning, The elder unto the elect lady; and the second, The elder unto the well-beloved Gaius—are considered by some to be the work of a certain John the Elder, whose tomb (one of two bearing the name John) still exists in Ephesus to this day. Others, however, maintain that these two epistles are also the work of John the Evangelist." (The Life of the Evangelist John) (PG 123col 1127) 15]

15] Sophronius, The Life of the Evangelist John , in Orthodox Classics in English (House Springs, MO: The Chrysostom Press) [on-line]; accessed 1December 2010; available from http://www.chrysostompress.org/the-four-evangelists; Internet.

It is easy to see how canonicity is a testimony to apostolic authorship when we understand that the debates of the early Church fathers to accept the general epistles of 2Peter, 2,3John, and Jude was simply a debate about their authorship. Apostolic authorship meant that the works were authentic, and thus, authoritative. It was the writing's apostolic authority that granted its inclusion into the New Testament canon. Therefore, canonicity was based upon apostolic authority, and this apostolic authority was based upon the authenticity of the writing, and its authenticity was based upon the fact that it was a genuine work of one of the apostles or one who was serving directly under that apostolic authority.

B. Church Orthodoxy- The second phase in the development of the New Testament canon placed emphasis upon Church orthodoxy, or the rule of faith for the catholic Church. F. B. Westcott says, "To make use of a book as authoritative, to assume that it is apostolic, to quote it as inspired, without preface or comment, is not to hazard a new or independent opinion, but to follow an unquestioned judgment." 16] The early Church fathers cited these apostolic writings as divinely inspired by God, equal in authority to the Old Testament Scriptures. They understood that these particular books embodied the doctrines that helped them express the Church's Creed, or generally accepted rule of faith. As F. B. Westcott notes, with a single voice the Church fathers of this period rose up from the western to the eastern borders of Christendom and became heralds of the same, unified Truth. 17] This phase is best represented in the writings of the early Church fathers by the collection of the apostolic writings into the distinctive groups of the Gospels, the Pauline epistles, and the Catholic epistles, and their distribution among the churches as the rules of the Christian faith (late 2nd century thru 3rd century). These collected works of the apostles were cited by the church fathers as they expounded upon the Christian faith and established Church orthodoxy. We will look at two aspects of the development of Church Orthodoxy: (1) the Patristic Support of Authenticity, Authority, and Orthodoxy and (2) Early Versions.

16] Brooke Foss Westcott, A General History of the Canon of the New Testament (London: Macmillan anc Co, 1875), 12.

17] Brooke Foss Westcott, A General History of the Canon of the New Testament (London: Macmillan anc Co, 1875), 331.

1. Patristic Support of Authenticity, Authority, and Orthodoxy- External evidence for the authorship of 3John is not quite as strong as for 2John. Donald Guthrie states that there are no certain citations of 3John before the third century, but this absence is attributed to the character and content of this shortest epistle. 18] While the authorship of 2,3John finds support in some of the early Church fathers who directly claim Johannine authorship, its authenticity refers to the fact that the fathers saw it as an authentic New Testament document regardless of who wrote it. Its authenticity is established simply by the fact that the fathers quote from these two epistles in their writings. This means that they were using these documents as a part of the accepted New Testament canonical writings. We can find a number of quotes from these epistles by the Church fathers. 19] Thus, the epistle of 2John was used by the Church fathers to establish Church orthodoxy.

18] Donald Guthrie, New Testament Introduction (Downers Grover, Illinois: Intervarsity Press, 1990), 891.

19] There are many other citations available from the early Church fathers that I have not used to support the traditional views of authorship of the books of the New Testament. Two of the largest collections of these citations have been compiled by Nathaniel Lardner (1684-1768) in The Works of Nathaniel Lardner, 10 vols. (London: Joseph Ogle Robinson, 1829, 1838), and by Jacques Paul Migne (1800-1875) in the footnotes of Patrologia Latina, 221vols. (Parisiis: Excudebat Migne, 1844-55) and Patrologia Graecae, 161vols. (Parisiis: Excudebat Migne, 1857-66).

2. Manuscript Evidence - A number of early third and fourth century manuscripts, such as p 23, containing the epistle of James , and p 72 (the Bodmer papyrus), containing the epistles of 1,2Peter, and Jude , reveal that the Catholic Epistles were being circulated as a collected corpus by the early Church. 20] These ancient manuscripts containing the collective body of General Epistles testify to the fact that the Church at large circulated these writings as a part of its orthodox faith.

20] The Bodmer Papyrus (p 72) contains 1Peter :14; 2 Peter 1:1-3:18; Jude 1:1-25. See Philip W. Comfort and David P. Barrett, eds, The Text of the Earliest New Testament Greek Manuscripts (Wheaton, Illinois: Tyndall House Publishers, 1999, 2001).

3. Early Versions - The earliest translations of books of the New Testament testify to their canonization. Perhaps as early as the second century, the New Testament was translated into Old Syriac and Old Latin. While the disputed epistles of Jude ,, 2 Peter ,, 2 John , and 3John were found in the Old Latin text, they are absent in the Old Syriac. 21] The Old Latin versions were later standardized into the Latin Vulgate by Jerome in the fourth century, which represent the canon as we know it today. The Syrian church has an unusual history regarding the development and acceptance of the New Testament Canon. While the Catholic epistles of James ,, 1 Peter , and 1John are found in the old Syriac, the lesser Catholic Epistles of 2Peter, 2,3John, Jude , and the Apocalypse are omitted from its canon. 22] This canon of 22New Testament books is reflected in the "Doctrine of Addai" (A.D 250-300) in which the clergy of Edessa are instructed to read from the Law, the Prophets, the Gospels and Acts and the Pauline Epistles, but not from the General Epistles. 23] Perhaps this comment was made because the Syriac versions only accepted three of the seven Catholic Epistles as canonical. The Old Syriac was soon formalized into the translation known as the Peshitta. The New Testament was translated in the Coptic languages of Egypt (Sahidic and Bhoairic) as early as the third century, representing the entire New Testament canon. The New Testament was soon translated into the languages of the Armenian (5th c), the Georgian (5th c), and the Ethiopic (6th c). 24] The Catholic Epistles would not have been translated with the other New Testament writings unless it was considered a part of the orthodox beliefs of the Church at large.

21] A. E. Brooke, A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the Johannine Epistles, in The International Critical Commentary on the Holy Scriptures of the Old and New Testaments, eds. Charles A. Briggs, Samuel R. Driver, and Alfred Plummer (Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1912), 220-223.

22] Bruce M. Metzger, "Important Early Translations of the Bible," in Bibliotheca Sacra, vol (Jan 1993) (Dallas, TX: Dallas Theological Seminary): 44, in Libronix Digital Library System, v 30b [CD-ROM] Bellingham, WA: Libronix Corp, 2004.

23] The Doctrine of Addai, the Apostle, trans. George Phillips (London: Trbner and Co 1876), 44.

24] The Old Latin Bible manuscripts of the fifth century, Codex Bezae (Gospels, Acts , Catholic epistles), Codex Claromontanus (Pauline epistles), and Codex Floriacensis ( Acts , Catholic epistles, Revelation) were used prior to Jerome's Vulgate (beginning A. D 382), and these Old Latin manuscripts testify to the canonization of the twenty-seven books of the New Testament at an early date. See Kurt Aland, Matthew Black, Carlo M. Martini, Bruce M. Metzger, M. Robinson, and Allen Wikgren, eds, The Greek New Testament, Third Edition (United Bible Societies, c 1966, 1968, 1975), xxxi-xxxiv.

C. Catholicity- The third and final phase of New Testament canonicity placed emphasis upon the aspect of catholicity, or the general acceptance of the canonical books. F. B. Westcott says, "The extent of the Canon, like the order of the Sacraments, was settled by common usage, and thus the testimony of Christians becomes the testimony of the Church." 25] This phase is best represented in the period of Church councils of the fourth century as bishops met and agreed upon a list of canonical books generally accepted by the catholic Church. However, approved canons were listed by individual Church fathers as early as the second century. These books exhibited a dynamic impact upon the individual believers through their characteristic of divine inspiration, transforming them into Christian maturity, being used frequently by the church at large. We will look at two testimonies of catholicity: (1) the Early Church Canons, and (2) Early Church Councils.

25] Brooke Foss Westcott, A General History of the Canon of the New Testament (London: Macmillan and Co, 1875), 12.

1. Early Church Canons- Athanasius gives us a canonical list that includes second and third John (c 367). 26] Cyril of Jerusalem (A.D 315-386) includes them in his list. 27] The Apostolic Constitutions includes all but the book of Revelation (late 4th c.). 28] Inclusion into these canons indicates that the books of the New Testament were universally accepted by the Church at large. These two epistles are listed in the Cheltenham List (A.D 359). 29] Cyril of Jerusalem, A.D 349, and Gregory Nazianzen, in A.D 389, both enumerate fourteen Epistles of Paul, and seven Catholic Epistles, which would match the New Testament canon as we have it today.

26] See Athansius, Festal Letters 395 (Easter, 367) (NPF 2 4).

27] See Cyril of Jerusalem, Catechetical Lectures 436 (NPF 2 7).

28] See The Ecclesiastical Canons of the Same Holy Apostles 4785 (ANF 7).

29] W. Sanday, The Cheltenham List of the Canonical Books of the Old and New Testament and the Writings of Cyprian, in Studia Biblica ed Ecclesiastica: Essays Chiefly in Biblical and Patristic Criticism, vol 3 (Oxford: The Clarendon Press, 1891) 223.

2. Early Church Councils- After the time of Jerome, both epistles were received by the Church at large, with the exception of the Syriac church. Although the council of Nicea (c 325-40) did not accept these epistles as authentic, the church councils of the late fourth century accepted the books of Jude ,, 2 Peter ,, 2 John , and 3John into the canon of Scripture. The disputed epistles of Jude ,, 2 Peter ,, 2 John , and 3John were accepted into the eighty-fifth of the apostolic canons, into the sixtieth canon of the synod of Laodicea, at the council of Hippo, (A.D 393), and the councils of Carthage, (A.D 397,419), which adopted a catalogue of New Testament books exactly agreeing with our canon.

Doubts of their authorship and canonization were removed in the Church at large through this early period and during the Middle Ages. As the Reformation period opened, with renewed studies in biblical research, doubts were again placed upon these particular epistles, which have carried doubts into the modern era. However, conservative scholars of today no longer doubt their genuineness and status within the Scriptures.

It was the brevity of John's two short epistles, along with their private nature, that made them less generally read and less quoted by the early Church fathers. However, such a list of witnesses above leads to the conclusion of Johannine authorship and their proper place in the New Testament canon.

During the fourth century, the Roman emperor Constantine was converted to Christianity and ordered Eusebius to produce fifty copies of the Scriptures. 30] The production and distribution of these Bibles, along with the Church synods that followed, served to confirm the twenty-seven books of the New Testament as canonical and authoritative. The early Church traditions of authorship and authenticity became firmly embedded within their canonicity. Therefore, citations of the New Testament Scriptures and later manuscript evidence after this period of Church history only serve to repeat traditions that had already become well-known and established among the churches of the fourth century.

30] Brooke Foss Westcott, A General Survey of the History of the Canon of the New Testament, fourth edition (London: Macmillan and Co, 1875), 422-426.

III. Date and Place of Writing

It is most likely that the General Epistles were written during the time when the early Church experienced its first large-scale persecutions at the hands of the Roman Emperors Nero (A.D 54-68) and Domitian (A.D 81-96). It was this season of persecutions that occasioned the need to write and encourage these early believers to hold fast to their faith in Christ, even at the cost of their lives.

Both internal and external evidence suggests that John wrote all three epistles during his later years while overseeing the churches in Asia Minor. He most like lived in Ephesus when he wrote His Gospel and three epistles. Eusebius (A.D 260 to 340) tells us that after John returned from the Island of Patmos he went on missionary journeys to set in order the nearby churches of Asia Minor.

"Listen to a tale, which is not a mere tale, but a narrative concerning John the apostle, which has been handed down and treasured up in memory. For when, after the tyrant"s death, he returned from the isle of Patmos to Ephesus, he went away upon their invitation to the neighboring territories of the Gentiles, to appoint bishops in some places, in other places to set in order whole churches, elsewhere to choose to the ministry some one of those that were pointed out by the Spirit." (Ecclesiastical History 3235)

It is possible that John wrote the second and third epistles in preparation for these missionary journeys, as evidenced in the following verses.

2 John 1:12, "Having many things to write unto you, I would not write with paper and ink: but I trust to come unto you, and speak face to face, that our joy may be full."

3 John 1:10, "Wherefore, if I come, I will remember his deeds which he doeth, prating against us with malicious words: and not content therewith, neither doth he himself receive the brethren, and forbiddeth them that would, and casteth them out of the church."

3 John 1:14, "But I trust I shall shortly see thee, and we shall speak face to face. Peace be to thee. Our friends salute thee. Greet the friends by name."

Therefore, it is likely that John wrote these two epistles at the same period of time, and after he wrote his Revelation. They would have most likely been written in Ephesus in the later part of the first century.

IV. Recipients

This epistle is clearly addressed to an individual named Gaius. A quick look at Scriptures finds three people with this name.

A. Gaius of Macedonia:

Acts 19:29, "And the whole city was filled with confusion: and having caught Gaius and Aristarchus, men of Macedonia, Paul"s companions in travel, they rushed with one accord into the theatre."

B. Gaius of Derbe:

Acts 20:4, "And there accompanied him into Asia Sopater of Berea; and of the Thessalonians, Aristarchus and Secundus; and Gaius of Derbe, and Timotheus; and of Asia, Tychicus and Trophimus."

C. Gaius of Corinth:

Romans 16:23, "Gaius mine host, and of the whole church, saluteth you. Erastus the chamberlain of the city saluteth you, and Quartus a brother."

1 Corinthians 1:14, "I thank God that I baptized none of you, but Crispus and Gaius;"

D. Gaius, bishop of Pergamos- In addition, there was a Gaius, bishop of Pergamos, referred to in the writings of the Apostolic Constitutions. Pergamos was a city of Mysia, in Asia Minor. A church was established in this city and was one of the seven churches referred to in Revelation 1:11.

"Now concerning those bishops which have been ordained in our lifetime, we let you know that they are these…..Of Pergamus, Gains." (Apostolic Constitutions 746)

We do have a comment from the early Church fathers as to the identity of this Gaius. William Alexander tells us that the writer of the Synopsis of Holy Scripture, which is dated in the 4th to 6th century, and attributed to various church fathers, says, "the Gospel according to John was both dictated by the John the apostle and beloved when in exile at Patmos, and by him was published in Ephesus, through Caius the beloved and friend of the apostles, of whom Paul writing to the Romans saith, Caius mine host and of the whole church." 31]

31] William Alexander, The Epistles of St. John , in The Expositor's Bible, eds. William R. Nicoll and Oscar L. Joseph (Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 1956), in Ages Digital Library, v 10 [CD-ROM] (Rio, WI: Ages Software, Inc, 2001), "Introduction."

It is not possible to accurately determine if any of the above-mentioned individuals is the one referred to in John's third epistle, and considering that the name was not uncommon during this period of history, we can only guess as to his identity. Many scholars say that the hospitality of Gaius the Corinthian agrees well with the character of this Gaius whom John addresses. However, we can conclude that the recipient to this third epistle must have lived relatively close to Ephesus, where John lived. As an elder in his 80's or 90's, John the apostle would most likely not have taken a long journey away from this region.

V. Occasion

The group of churches that were planted by Paul and others soon found itself sending traveling ministers from church to church. Since public inns of the first century were considered dirty and of poor service Christians found themselves in the more comfortable homes of fellow believers. John R. W. Stott gives a list of verses that show how Paul was hosted in homes on his missionary journeys, Lydia in Philippi, Jason in Thessalonica, Philip the evangelist in Caesarea, Mnason of Cyprus in Jerusalem and Gaius in Corinth. 32]

32] John R. W. Stott, The Epistles Of John , in The Bible Speaks Today (Grand Rapids, Michigan: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co, 1982), 198-199. Cited by Benjamin C. Chapman, The Third Epistle of John , in The KJV Bible Commentary, eds. Edward E. Hindson and Woodrow M. Kroll (Nashville: Thomas Nelson Pub, 1994), in Libronix Digital Library System, v 21c [CD-ROM] (Bellingham, WA: Libronix Corp, 2000-2004), "Introduction."

Acts 16:15, "And when she was baptized, and her household, she besought us, saying, If ye have judged me to be faithful to the Lord, come into my house, and abide there. And she constrained us."

Acts 17:7, "Whom Jason hath received: and these all do contrary to the decrees of Caesar, saying that there is another king, one Jesus."

Acts 21:8, "And the next day we that were of Paul"s company departed, and came unto Caesarea: and we entered into the house of Philip the evangelist, which was one of the seven; and abode with him."

Acts 21:16, "There went with us also certain of the disciples of Caesarea, and brought with them one Mnason of Cyprus, an old disciple, with whom we should lodge."

Romans 16:23, "Gaius mine host, and of the whole church, saluteth you. Erastus the chamberlain of the city saluteth you, and Quartus a brother."

In addition, the epistles of Paul make other references to churches receiving the brethren that he had sent. Thus, staying in a fellow believer's home was a custom of the early Church for traveling ministers. Unfortunately, this itinerate ministry was sometimes abused by false teachers, who used it as an opportunity to gain recognition and material gain, resulting in confusion in these churches. Sometimes, the traveling ministers were not given adequate provision.

We see from the context of this epistle that John was writing to a dear and beloved fellow Christian named Gaius who had performed the noble task of receiving the brethren. John wishes him health and prosperity as a blessing for his good deeds. Because of John's age, he had probably sent out representatives with a letter to churches that they were to visit. These itinerate missionaries had been rejected by Diotrephes. However, Gaius had taken them in and cared for them. When these missionaries returned and reported this event to John , he wrote this letter of commendation to Gaius as a token of appreciation. After telling Gaius that he will deal with Diotrephes when he visits, John gives a word of commendation about a man named Demetrius. Thus, this letter takes the appearance of a letter of commendation.

Also, as referred to above under "Date and Place of Writing," we see that John's missionary journeys which he conducted after his release from exile would have occasioned the writing of these letters prior to his leaving, since he makes a reference in both epistles to visiting the recipients ( 2 John 1:12, 3 John 1:10; 3 John 1:14).

There is one other observation that I would like to add concerning the occasion of this epistle. As an African missionary, I have seen how easily "politics" invades the churches in so many of the cities. There is often a power struggle between misguided or corrupt pastors, while they give one another fancy titles as a part of acknowledging this struggle. Some pastors attempt to prop themselves up as powerful church leaders with titles such as Apostle, Bishop, or Prophet Song of Solomon -And-So. They manipulate each other and play games with international ministers for financial gain. This could have been the reason for the unacceptable behavior of Diotrephes, who wanted the preeminence among the believers.

LITERARY STYLE (GENRE)

"Perhaps the most important issue in interpretation is the issue of genre.

If we misunderstand the genre of a text, the rest of our analysis will be askew."

(Thomas Schreiner) 33]

33] Thomas R. Schreiner, Interpreting the Pauline Epistles, second edition (Grand Rapids, Michigan: Baker Academic, c 1990, 2011), 11.

Within the historical setting of the early church, the authors of the New Testament epistles chose to write to various groups of believers using the literary style of the formal Greco-Roman epistle, which contains a traditional salutation, the body, and a conclusion. Thus, the New Testament epistles are assigned to the literary genre called "epistle genre," In the introductory section of literary style, a comparison will be made of the New Testament epistles.

VI. Comparison of the New Testament Epistles

A. Comparison of Content: It is More Practical than Doctrinal - As is characteristic of all of the General Epistles, 3John is more practical than doctrinal.

B. Comparison of Content: Its Brevity- The epistle of 3John is the shortest book in the Holy Bible, with only 219 Greek words.

THEOLOGICAL FRAMEWORK

"Scholarly excellence requires a proper theological framework."

(Andreas Ksenberger) 34]

34] Andreas J. Ksenberger, Excellence: The Character of God and the Pursuit of Scholarly Virtue (Wheaton, Illinois: Crossway, 2011), 161.

Based upon the historical setting and literary style of the epistle of 3John, an examination of the purpose, thematic scheme, and literary structure to this book of the Holy Scriptures will reveal its theological framework. This introductory section will sum up its theological framework in the form of an outline, which is then used to identify smaller units or pericopes within the epistle of 3John for preaching and teaching passages of Scripture while following the overriding message of the book. Following this outline allows the minister of the Gospel of Jesus Christ to take his followers on a spiritual journey that brings them to the same destination that the author intended his readers to reach.

VII. Purpose

A. Hortatory- The primary purpose of the General Epistles is hortatory.

The hortatory purpose reflects the primary and second theme of the epistles of 1, 2, and 3John, which is the perseverance in the faith against false doctrine from within the Church.

B. Practical/Occasional- The Johannine epistles clearly serve as occasional letters to either an individual or to a church. The epistles of 1, 2,3John were written in order to deal with a particular occasion or event taking place within the local church body and between certain individual. John wrote these epistles in order to give practical instructions on how to deal with these situations. The first epistle deals with the influence of Gnosticism within the church. The second epistle deals with this same issue as it relates to a particular family of believers in the Church. The third epistle deals with rebellion to church authority as a result of such false doctrines.

The practical purpose reflects the third themes of the Johannine epistles, which is to walk in fellowship with the Lord and fellow believers.

VIII. Thematic Scheme

Introduction- Each book of the Holy Scriptures contains a three-fold thematic scheme in order to fulfill its intended purpose, which is to transform each child of God into the image of Jesus Christ ( Romans 8:29). The primary, or foundational, theme of a book offers a central claim that undergirds everything written by the author. The secondary, or structural theme, of the book supports its primary theme by offering reasons and evidence for the central "claim" made by the author as it fully develops the first theme. Thus, the secondary theme is more easily recognized by biblical scholars than the other two themes because they provide the literary content of the book as they navigate the reader through the arguments embedded within the biblical text, thus revealing themselves more clearly. 35] The third theme is imperative in that it calls the reader to a response based upon the central claim and supporting evidence offered by the author. Each child of God has been predestined to be conformed into the image and likeness of the Lord Jesus Christ, and the Scriptures, and they alone, have the power to accomplish this task. This is why a child of God can read the Holy Scriptures with a pure heart and experience a daily transformation taking place in his life, although he may not fully understand what is taking place in his life. In addition, the reason some children of God often do not see these biblical themes is because they have not fully yielded their lives to Jesus Christ, allowing transformation to take place by the power of the indwelling Holy Spirit. Without a personal relationship with the Holy Spirit, a child of God is not willing to allow Him to manage his life and move him down the road that God predestined as his spiritual journey. This journey requires every participant to take up his cross daily and follow Jesus, and not every believer is willing to do this. In fact, every child of God chooses how far down this road of sacrifice he is willing to go. Very few of men and women of God fulfill their divine destinies by completing this difficult journey. In summary, the first theme drives the second theme, which develops the first theme, and together they demand the third theme, which is the reader's response.

35] For an excellent discussion on the use of claims, reasons, and evidence in literature, see Wayne C. Booth, Gregory G. Colomb, and Joseph M. Williams, The Craft of Research (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2003).

A. Primary Theme (Foundational) of the Epistle of 3John: The Perseverance of the Saints: Against False Doctrines from Within the Church- Introduction- The central theme of the Holy Bible is God's plan of redemption for mankind. This theme finds its central focus in the Cross, where our Lord and Saviour died to redeem mankind. The central figure of the Holy Scriptures is the Lord Jesus Christ. Thus, the Cross is the place where man meets God and where we die to our selfish ambitions and yield our lives to the God who created all things. Therefore, the Holy Scriptures are not intended to be a precise record of ancient history. Rather, its intent is to provide a record of God's divine intervention in the history of mankind in order to redeem the world back to Himself through the sacrifice of Jesus Christ on Calvary.

Every book of the Holy Bible makes a central claim that undergirds the arguments or message contained within its text. For example, the central claim of the Pentateuch is found in Deuteronomy 6:4, "Hear, O Israel: The LORD our God is one LORD," to which all additional material is subordinate. The bulk of the material in the Old Testament is subordinate in that it serves as reasons and evidence to support this central claim. This material serves as the secondary theme, offering the literary structure of the book. In addition, the central claim calls for a response, which is stated in the following verse, "And thou shalt love the LORD thy God with all thine heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy might." ( Deuteronomy 6:5) Such a response is considered the third, imperative theme that runs through every book of the Holy Scriptures.

This central claim is the primary, or foundational, theme and is often obscured by the weight of evidence that is used to drive the central message, which weight of evidence makes up the secondary theme; and thus, it contains more content than the primary theme. Therefore, the secondary themes of the books of the Holy Scripture are generally more recognizable than the primary theme. Nevertheless, the central claim, or truth, must be excavated down to the foundation and made clearly visible in order to understand the central theme driving the arguments contained within the book. Only then can proper exegesis and sermon delivery be executed.

1. The Central Themes of the New Testament Epistles: Sanctification of the Believer- There are twenty-one epistles in the New Testament, which the early Church recognized as having apostolic authority so that they were collected into one body, circulated among the churches, an eventually canonized. While the Gospels emphasize the redemptive work of the Lord Jesus Christ in the process justification of the believer, New Testament epistles emphasize the redemptive plan of the Holy Spirit as He works in the process of sanctification for each believer. Thus, the work of sanctification serves as the underlying theme of all twenty-one epistles. In addition, each one emphasizes a different aspect of this divine process of sanctification and they are organized together so that the New Testament is structured to reflect the part of our spiritual journey called sanctification In order to express this structure, each of these epistles have different themes that are woven and knitted together into a unified body of teachings which will bring the believer through the process of sanctification and ready for the rapture of the Church into a place of rest in the glorious hope revealed in the book of Revelation. Therefore, the New Testament epistles were collected together by topic by the early Church.

Of the twenty-one epistles, there are thirteen Pauline epistles and eight designated as General, or Catholic, epistles. We can organize these twenty-one epistles into three major categories: (1) there are epistles that emphasize Church doctrine, which are the nine Pauline epistles of Romans to 2Thessalonians; (2) there are those that deal with Church order and divine service, which are 1,2Timothy, Titus and Philemon; 36] and (3) there are those that stress perseverance in the Christian faith, which are Hebrews and the seven General Epistles. 37] Within Hebrews and the General Epistles, we note that the first three epistles exhort the believer to persevere under persecutions, which come from without the Church ( Hebrews ,, James , 1Peter), while the other five epistles emphasis perseverance against false doctrines, which come from within ( 2 Peter , 1, 2, 3 John , Jude).

36] For the sake of developing thematic schemes, the epistle of Philemon will be grouped with the Pastoral Epistles as did the Church fathers.

37] For the sake of developing thematic schemes, the epistle of Hebrews will be grouped with the General Epistles, although many of the early Church fathers followed the tradition of grouping it with the Pauline epistles.

2. The Central Theme of the Catholic, or General, Epistles: Perseverance in the Christian Faith - We know that the nine Pauline "Church" epistles, Romans to 2Thessalonians, serve to lay the doctrinal foundation of the Church. In addition, the Pastoral Epistles establishes the order of the Church, and how the Body of Christ functions in this world. This leaves us to consider the eight remaining epistles, seven of which are called the "Catholic Epistles" because they are addressed to a much broader group of believers than the Pauline Epistles. Although the seven Catholic, or General, Epistles include James , 1, 2 Peter , 1, 2, 3, John , and Jude , for the sake of this evaluation of thematic schemes, the book of Hebrews is included. As Paul's Church Epistles establish the doctrines of the Church, the Catholic Epistles deal with the practical struggles that each believer has in fulfilling the Christian life. Thus, these Epistles tend to be more practical and ethical than doctrinal or theological.

The early church faced two great challenges that attacked their sacred doctrines. They experienced persecutions from without, as addressed in Hebrews , James and 1Peter; and, they endured heresies from within, as dealt with in 2Peter, 1, 2, and 3John and Jude. 38] The underlying theme of Hebrews and the Catholic Epistles is the perseverance in the Christian faith, 39] exhorting the saints to persevere amidst persecutions from without the Church as well as false doctrines from within the Church. 40] The books of Hebrews , James and 1Peter address the particular issue of perseverance under persecutions from without the church, a theme popularly referred to as the "pilgrim motif." 41] 2 Peter , the three epistles of John and Jude deal with the particular issue of false ministers and doctrines that attack the church from within ( 2 Peter 3:1-4, 1 John 2:26, Jude 1:3-4). Thus, there are three witnesses of perseverance under persecutions ( Hebrews , James and 1Peter) and three witnesses of perseverance under false doctrines ( 2 Peter , 1, 2, 3 John , and Jude). As with two epistles to the Corinthians and Thessalonians, the three epistles of John serve as one witness because they share similar themes among themselves.

38] J. B. Lightfoot recognized this two-fold aspect of Christian perseverance, saying, "The armoury of this epistle [Galatians] has furnished their keenest weapons to the combatants in the two greatest controversies which in modern times have agitated the Christian Church; the one a struggle for liberty within the camp, the other a war of defence against assailants from without; the one vitally affecting the doctrine, the other the evidences of the Gospel." See J. B. Lightfoot, Saint Paul's Epistle to the Galatians (London: Macmillian and Co, Limited, 1910), 67.

39] I do not adhere to the doctrine popularly referred to as "Once saved, always saved," or "the perseverance of the saints," a belief that has emerged in the modern church among several denominations, which has its apparent roots in Calvinist theology.

40] P. P. Saydon offers this theme for the epistle of Hebrews. See P. P. Saydon, "The Master Idea of the Epistle to the Hebrews ," Melita Theologica XIII, no 1-2 (1961) 19-26. See also George Salmon, "The Keynote to the Epistle of the Hebrews ," in The Expositor, second series, vol 3, ed. Samuel Cox (London: Hodder and Stoughton, 1882), 83.

41] Philip Mauro, God's Pilgrims: Their Dangers, Their Resources, Their Rewards (London: Samuel E. Roberts, 1921); Ernst Ksemann, The Wandering People of God: An Investigation of the Letter to the Hebrews , trans. Ray A. Harrisville and Irving L. Sandberg (Minneapolis, MN: Ausburg Publishing House, 1984); David J. MacLeod, "The Doctrinal Center of the Book of Hebrews ," Bibliotheca Sacra (July 1989): 291-300, in Libronix Digital Library System, v 21c [CD-ROM] (Bellingham, WA: Libronix Corp, 2000-2004), 297.

B. Secondary Theme (Structural) of the Epistle of 3John - Introduction- The secondary themes of the books of the Holy Scriptures support the primary themes by offering reasons and evidence for the central "claim" of the book made by the author. Thus, the secondary themes are more easily recognized by biblical scholars than the other two themes because they provide the literary structure of the book as they navigate the reader through the arguments embedded within the biblical text, thus revealing themselves more clearly. For example, the central claim of the Pentateuch declares that the Lord God of Israel is the only God that man should serve, and man is to love the Lord God with all of his heart, mind, and strength, a statement found in the Shema of Deuteronomy 6:4-5, which is the foundational theme of the Old Testament. The books of Hebrew poetry provide evidence to this claim by expounding upon how man is to love God with all of his heart as its secondary theme. The books of the prophets provide evidence to this claim by expounding upon how man is to love God with all of his mind as its secondary theme, as he set his hope in the coming of the Messiah to redeem mankind. The historical books provide evidence to this claim by expounding upon how man is to love God with all of his strength as its secondary theme.

The central claim of the four Gospel writers is that Jesus Christ is the Son of God, which is the foundational theme of this division of the Holy Scriptures. In addition, each Gospel writer offers evidence as its secondary theme to support his claim. The Gospel of John offers the five-fold testimony of God the Father, John the Baptist, the miracles of Jesus, the Old Testament Scriptures, and the testimony of Jesus Christ Himself as its secondary theme. Matthew expounds upon the testimony of the Old Testament Scriptures as its secondary theme; Mark expounds upon the testimony of the miracles of Jesus as its secondary theme; Luke expounds upon the testimony of John the Baptist and other eye-witnesses and well as that of the apostles in the book of Acts as its secondary theme.

The central claim of the Pauline Church Epistles is that the Gospel of Jesus Christ alone how the power to redeem and transform man into the image of Jesus, which is the foundational theme of this division of the Holy Scriptures. The epistle of Romans supports this claim by offering evidence of mankind's depravity and God's plan of redemption to redeem him as its secondary theme. The epistles of Ephesians and Philippians expound upon the role of God the Father in His divine foreknowledge as their secondary theme; the epistles of Colossians and Galatians expound upon the role of Jesus Christ as the head of the Church as their secondary theme; the epistles of 1, 2 Thessalonians , 1, 2Corinthians expound upon the role of the Holy Spirit in sanctifying the believers as their secondary theme.

The central claim of the Pastoral Epistles is that believers must serve God through the order of the New Testament Church. The epistles of 1, 2Timothy expound upon how to serve the Lord within the Church with a pure heart, which is its secondary theme. The epistle of Titus expounds upon how to serve the Lord within the Church with a renewed mind, which is its secondary theme. The epistle of Philemon expounds upon how to serve the Lord within the Church with a genuine lifestyle, which is its secondary theme.

The central claim of the General Epistles is that believers must persevere in the Christian faith in order to obtain eternal redemption. The epistles of Hebrews ,, James , and 1Peter modify this theme to reflect perseverance from persecutions from without the Church. The epistle of Hebrews expounds upon the High Priesthood of Jesus Christ, which is its secondary theme. The epistle of James expounds upon a lifestyle of perseverance through the joy of the Holy Spirit, which is its secondary theme. The epistle of 1Peter expounds upon our hope of divine election through God the Father, which is its secondary theme. The epistles of 2Peter, 1, 2, 3, John and Jude reflect perseverance from false doctrines from within. The epistle of 2Peter expounds upon growing in the knowledge of God's Word with a sound mind, which is its secondary theme. The epistles of 1, 2, 3John expound upon walking in fellowship with God and one another with a pure heart, which is its secondary theme. The epistle of Jude expounds how living a godly lifestyle with our bodies, which is its secondary theme.

The Apocalypse of John , though not considered an epistle, emphasizes the glorification of the Church, giving believers a vision of the hope that is laid up before them as a source of encouragement for those who persevere until the end. The central claim of the book of Revelation is that Jesus Christ is coming to take His Bride the Church to Glory. The secondary theme supports this claim with the evidence of Great Tribulation Period.

1. The Secondary Themes of 2Peter, 1, 2, 3 John , and Jude - While the five epistles of 2Peter, 1, 2, 3John and Jude share a common, foundational theme of perseverance from false doctrines from within the Church, they also carry secondary themes that give each of them a distinct emphasis upon one aspect of the believer's perseverance in the Christian faith. When we compare the themes of 2Peter, 1, 2, 3John and Jude , we can also find a relationship between them, just as with Hebrews , James and 1Peter. These five General Epistles deal with false doctrines that attack the believer from within the church. We find one reference to this underlying theme in 1 John 2:19, "They went out from us, but they were not of us; for if they had been of us, they would no doubt have continued with us: but they went out, that they might be made manifest that they were not all of us."

This second division of the General Epistles reflects a three-fold aspect of this theme of perseverance against false doctrines. Jesus told the disciples in John 14:6 that He was the Way, the Truth and the Life.

John 14:6, "Jesus saith unto him, I am the way, the truth, and the life: no man cometh unto the Father, but by me."

In other words, with our minds we are to learn the way of the Christian life, and with our bodies we are to walk in this truth, and with our hearts we can experience fellowship with the Father. This is the walk that will keep us from falling away into doctrinal error.

Here is a summary of the secondary themes of 2Peter, Jude 1:1-2, 3John.

a) Understanding the Way (Our Minds) - The theme of 2Peter is the message for the saints to persevere amidst false teachings. In order to do this, Peter stirs up their minds ( 2 Peter 3:1) so that they understand how to grow in the grace and knowledge of God's Word, which develops their character into Christ-likeness. For this reason, this epistle opens and closes with this very exhortation ( 2 Peter 1:2-11 and 2 Peter 3:14-18). Even though Peter did not have the revelation into the doctrine that Paul received and wrote about, he did acknowledge Paul's deep insight and the divine inspiration of his writings by equating them with "other Scriptures" ( 2 Peter 3:16). It is these Scriptures that we are to read and try to understand in order to grown in the knowledge of God's Word.

2 Peter 3:16, "As also in all his epistles, speaking in them of these things; in which are some things hard to be understood, which they that are unlearned and unstable wrest, as they do also the other scriptures, unto their own destruction."

b) Walking in the Truth (Our Bodies) - The theme of Jude is also the exhortation to persevere against false doctrines from within the Church. This epistle places emphasis upon our diligence to walk in the truth by living a godly lifestyle, and building up ourselves in our most holy faith by praying in the Holy Ghost.

c) Life Thru Fellowship with the Saints (Our Spirits) - The theme of 1John is also the exhortation to persevere against false doctrines from within the Church; but 1John places emphasis upon the believer's fellowship with the Father as the way to persevere. As the Gospel of John centers on Jesus' fellowship with the Heavenly Father, so does this epistle center on our fellowship with our Heavenly Father. We maintain this fellowship by confessing our sins and abiding in the Word. The epistle of 1John serves as a basis, or foundation, for the themes of 2,3John, since it deals with the issues of walking in fellowship with God and fellow believers as well as how to identify false brethren. His second epistle places emphasis on identifying those who are false, while the third epistle of John places more emphasis on receiving those who are genuine and how to walk in love with them. Another way to say this is that 2,3John give us real life illustrations of false and genuine brethren, of those who walk in fellowship with the Heavenly Father, and those who do not.

C. Third Theme (Supportive) - The Crucified Life of the Believer (Example of a False Believer Not Walking in Fellowship with the Lord) - Introduction- The third theme of each book of the New Testament is a call by the author for the reader to apply the central truth, or claim, laid down in the book to the Christian life. It is a call to a lifestyle of crucifying the flesh and taking up one's Cross daily to follow Jesus. Every child of God has been predestined to be conformed to the image of Jesus Christ ( Romans 8:29), and every child of God faces challenges as well as failures in the pursuit of his Christian journey. For example, the imperative theme of the Old Testament is that God's children are to serve the Lord God with all of their heart, mind, and strength, and love their neighbour as themselves ( Deuteronomy 6:4-5).

The child of God cannot fulfill his divine destiny of being conformed into the image of Jesus without yielding himself and following the plan of redemption that God avails to every human being. This 4-fold, redemptive path is described in Romans 8:29-30 as predestination, calling, justification, and glorification. The phase of justification can be further divided into regeneration, indoctrination, divine service, and perseverance. Although each individual will follow a unique spiritual journey in life, the path is the same in principle for every believer since it follows the same divine pattern described above. This allows us to superimpose one of three thematic schemes upon each book of the Holy Scriptures in order to vividly see its imperative theme. Every book follows a literary structure that allows either (1) the three-fold scheme of Father, Song of Solomon , and Holy Spirit: or (2) the scheme of spirit, soul, and body of man; or (3) the scheme of predestination, calling, justification (regeneration, indoctrination, divine service, and perseverance), and glorification in some manner.

1. The Third, Imperative Theme of the Epistle of 2John- The epistle of 1John serves as a basis, or foundation, for the themes of 2,3John, since it deals with the issues of walking in fellowship with God and fellow believers, as well as how to identify false brethren. The theme of 1John is the exhortation to persevere against false doctrines from within the Church, which is done by the believer's fellowship with the Father. As the Gospel of John centers on Jesus' fellowship with the Heavenly Father, so does this epistle center on our fellowship with our Heavenly Father. His second epistle places emphasis on identifying those who are false, while the third epistle of John places more emphasis on receiving those who are genuine and how to walk in love with them. Another way to say this is that 2,3John give us real life illustrations of false and genuine brethren, of those who walk in fellowship with the Heavenly Father, and those who do not.

Both the second and third epistles of John discuss those who travel about in the work of the Gospel. While the third epistle of John places more emphasis on receiving those who are genuine, his second epistle places emphasis on identifying those who are false. In the third epistle, we are to learn to open the door to genuine ministers of God, but in the second epistle, we are to close the door to heretics. William MacDonald says the third epistle shows tender love, while the second shows tough love. 42] However, both lay stress on the truth as the true means of walking in love.

42] William MacDonald, The Third Epistle of John , in Believer's Bible Commentary, ed. Arthur Farstad (Nashville: Thomas Nelson Pub, 1995), in Libronix Digital Library System, v 21c [CD-ROM] (Bellingham, WA: Libronix Corp, 2000-2004), "Introduction."

This second epistle also reveals the fact that the identity of the Lord Jesus Christ was a major theme in the life of the early Church. John adamantly declares the deity of the Lord Jesus against the beliefs of these false teachers in this short epistle.

Thus, the theme of this second letter would be, "Walking in truth is the proof of genuine love," while the theme of the third epistle would testify, "Love is the proof of those who walk in the truth." Both are truths in action which were expressed in the first epistle. If we were only given the warnings of the second epistle, we might find ourselves behaving too suspiciously and harshly in such circumstances. We would have been given the negative without the positive, but John gives us the third epistle in order to balance the walk of love for God's Word and His people.

Proverbs 0s 8WPOTzs 4Lkv 6zNGmn/M 7fNXh 7XrZNq 4v 8RqvmjrhEDX 7+rJdfEZryCiNCwOJ 5vy 5j+iF 05nt 7pBwaMgBBrIwkMj 4BfacR/QiqMKwGUEasnwpBhIZf/4jev 5Skef 4to 7LcJmf 5/dvIFKCAS 8GyI 1/liN 6Xk 3ViUqP 3/kyH 07IhzGJ 1MtmgMP 2XoVBb/LVu 1jLM 3fVR 7BMvGU 0cXF 0gOtThw 5FMxmKbw 8d 1HgMuc 90pkIqy 2XOp 4ZHPvJHd 4Xl 1Tp/ro+L+o 6dw/3bNsV 5/sVF+52xSaW 8cFWi 9Q 0Zi 0TG 37cpbdiYZYzw 4+Fuf 3b 5I+F 9XurqTkT 7of 1rZyCR 8YugmnVKrro 4Q 9xA 2Xv 9jIwRivspN 2r 8F 72H 3OGXbmRb 3KMda 9dUtJ+cgUQ 7/PpelRRP 8bZem/RtEd 2uqdZWQgOAOCRLd 6EHHWBfiqLT 8YfKH 6FJPnO 0qXf 49dw 8Ie 7JS 3hWx 1P 5lcPvivbTWb 4nFCQDA 3MykC 6cbgWpZVha/tAfnnbGtJvkzCOo 3eBxAsD 1Moi 8xoPuBj/20Wn+8fOW 9BOInnJxQsNr 1s+4IdYXVap 208Nb 2E 0+uMCT 0gCSlkWvq 6RwGS 71td 0fcZH+6c 2vZBfpV 6cPVERR 3uV 5uHzcpFhZpHLrcIEnFZMop 2KAPNpPt 4ouLvNIKKbF 3eQTcYEnzi 8kVKCvUHS 6OX+gq+KY 8yfe 4deqkWa 3XEo+Qy/wbM 2cegXC 3E 1NMukL 1M 6g 5Mz 51PASLfXRd 4vMl 0+6DWYA 2Lmo 2b 4lRSBnAHVEYUgR 9q 1Dk 20qIUWb 0JTIjb 9/FV 1G+uP 5ZU 4oS+P 31Rv+3BIhxBYPqRLp 1vmNbbPt 1agRy 5cv 0ZX 7//Tj 2Wnjb 8F 3DfnaUqp 0iwOciojocrHFw 6Yu 4Rw 1bClap 66/6Lf 0kiz 1DW 86cE 7xuvuCnOeCq 7zUE 78IwAKJ 19YAaqhBE 2SvxPwRms 1gjpbnUl+egz 2689tdlOt 8Hh 815m 73hbgFxPxsU 14u 3sXlD 1jlrS 5FrnuA 89/Ppzc/pW+11g/dUtTXYJDNyG 8NUurl 3KTR/jC/pG 9HcP+4Rd 79xwNuov 5uV 4UcqtdoHpKIP 8Iljvwpd/iFa+uAPlCLf 2Q 3cYhmutMyANzeFOh 6EzHN 7snp 9NklkJI 5NFkjAU 6KlgSRVYiGR 278qa 6dmZVQpS 5h/cWsgLWwvbYG 8IA 6pOWkCH 23P 0SbHSnaaBTj 2zrIl/qmTIbKZ 3pey/dy/377dXR 3YpywJVrsmQIvLO+CAPOHSorQd/tDmLyN 1KRoo 1H 0Zky 31BeNNXd 0Si 8oGhG 84bXFuXbLIkwVrVTOjLjEqaKFfG 9/tJwyH 1ypbwqsJ 4DlwuJw+F/srn/7N 0OsfMK 9Y 9gaEK 2PK 8jIx/gjDq 5MlE/5rIi 8xV 8+ESwOEaov/R/RPb 3ebKy 1vqOjtBuRprWQ/7tJ 09oXnBs+ Leviticus 1ZwqW+4FDFUHSKOoiioz 71F 3tPUTD 2TgZiwDY 3Q 7eiNEh 8w 9rEUKdzl 5rMBAix 1Gcy 4LW 3zF 8K 9Aqqrb 2O 4ssLcug+lIAlQhtdye 7oOUTPuDYlVDoCF 2ROrUYz 51PDI 1/qUzzQXzszK 6HzLvX 1mPCQZYctuM 7KrVdvQY 3Q 9qNGO 1EvjE 0iarSB 1Y 8l 1/ASzfmDond 9l/z 33vIdPNebmmFCyG 1q 1SK/INP 16unxt 9PX 94O 7fLzzMcB 7va 5UG 8nh 5I 516IZAhdxFJDL+oOhdj 6Ym 3IhedjcqVNes+HEO 3cXJH 28TOHlrj 0wesd 44/tnnShbw 89pbNuihWPEqQlfK 2HbcRPn 84n 0B 7iId 4L 643UA 8r 9/tdwU 2SKH 2afwk 35oOYT 0pNeD 4iX 7MmTb+Tos 2oGK/pKnn/H 4ohlPZRwPoCDVsxhL 7aGy 8vTV+WGlIAcdZ 1GiLKgHQQa 0KbJ 3qmG 5dpAjDAiIRqkyKNqL+kSzcjb+UjzVI 0RHamIRlzeMaOu 95fnolSOb 0hRHl 0zA 66fvUNjUNc 7Tpjd/RvXJx/MxNfbqDkXjHALb 6h 1wjf 7wutjcHSAfC 0UhqZXW 5SNPWUakRxlPqk 5M 52tTGT 3qat+SblNDWyn 753zHLVy 8O 9XwyWJSP 1rXS 1FKwtjCLp 5PaH 1JuVeEBwRGfhtEhNGTdYByXvQ/IZJ 5UUOXjiTMYvz+hXlNTOvGPs 0OSggFgTWz 3i 9VEBlB 9p 6kTRTMh 1htQM 3M+NbxES 33yve 27sAuj 5joz 1zuaM/tDBD/6JFL 9RTyUyqxVeeGId 2B 2t 9fiRIdY 4v 3f 42t 1kAtLfVR+dZhvrLrT/jx 8HuoMdhepu 3/Prbr 2AOW 3hZkaqlOi/p 6gY 4wlQhgd 6w 0Y 9qmnqGFV+6RO 7fb 7YOhOUIf 0g 0j 8EcCq 7qmOWPluDaAG 7OwhJ 1lUsjmqT/A 0TBBUZEbHeoPgUqENqtQ/cTrj 95rA+wNNqaD+lhOzNYC 5BpgioIZKrwN 0CONivWEKS 4c 2rF 7P 1Knn/HFTOftynbRb+yNv 5pBTxbOTjWof 3yl 0RIAgTmTOXPKOhMCID 2Htw 0XVe 8n/qql/+d/4d 6SywU 5SUaKAXwTWznEL 8WR 2QvsPupmjvvGjDBOdXf 4o 9aYQlwHVMaOI 9oZmcR 5/8jiPIHhNSKOzFfJ 95c 61Jx 5QQylB+okMUPvVMQG/OurX 8sMt 73FuVyrYXUwNeDAAaM 9TxjbYpIbq 6Y 4OJOOPMOU 0ajp/VglJ 3f 6+ufSwdxV 0EHBijxeRnZ 27KBaoTm 9+Dd 47FtFMZFkRA 3zc/uPrvwfh 6esr 8jaPl 8bN 3eQiifWiyYFEFyid 64FP/bKYuAzdcsGTut+4JC 9anH 0ZjePn 5GUncPv 9o+gB/kxqxy 9qGX 0IPzVg 6sMSBnZqqAFi 9UyaCCG 50FVz 6NE 2wh+bwnkQms 7tV 5feLO/D 3ot 2XHmySKKXpxoMEDfC/1P 8rJzj 6S 4cH 7d/bopHvOi 54aH+NTPQLIL/LP 6owf 252E 42f 2q 338PtiEpC 7UpFeNGeh/+q 5iUGTDm 3ooPqOkNcGe 0kwHQIo 5QvMBMp 2lLrCJz 9pg 0aXqLbe 5uaqHZ 7kRIaKEwzuffsixKwrDTm 6m 7PdhJC 1dZPqq 4JZtGe 1EQlI+Qzqv 6RTOnm/BHOWd/tvfqSzYgyk 2VJM/sahPvxcPcmni 5VW 9Kqj 1wb 8Tk 4WfuLcp+P 4Dn 5dh+BS 6leMzc 9Sl 9rMmnPWnByu+Aw 56/syThrLbWnPEAz/HjeFNG 0mPWePiWafQ 01JeLqblVc 7rdPzUboXkCI 8vZdrOB 6MzxFql 8qb 3q 7SD 3n 93b 7uwmT 7fCL 9KLDZl 90vl/Eox 1VTGin 7idqCnBLgw 6qNd 3Tljhpul 8WSYwwIuAT 4n+Toh 2xixBc 7WgUnzn/yMVvdIRG 21IYz 3SA 1fH 4iDl/TWnd 4jbFdYMIoeo 5/3SDN+kmRKjYpIXX 0gxStAkvRORj/JWn 3zhutnzoCO 3zRQZ 8lJgDC 3SA 9TBuOrWe 2muH 33uicHRQFxHt 93ZGw 3r 7JjUdn 6rMVBciHimfSnxEeE 1/J 5w 6ibn 10wXBvh 86eGImLBZL 7fiZmiC 7fo 6mgg 5wNATfjPyh 0iIUOnl 3knDvOC 1aXyl 6p 9Pwkhu/N 6SRhJSECuFv 7fi 5DI 3dnD 4TdFK 6GZSAqUjsKYc/VFKEUvydYxHCkyLbMEmKll 72Gh 6HaL 9uXq 7LPGQYtYxAN 6eI 3m+97nTIhZBK 4o 7VIkTdnW 9Dklk+leiMclJpHR/jz 3yZR 0sDfGSfGeF 0LXq 5kg 5Oa+bq 09LpVaMEKgYSah 0f 43e 9ndr 7BDUVs 0HlcEEYckeX 623voEZPSxwCdVpNQbmX 5BAl 1LpUxi 89lXI 7mXZZxtxN 5pd 5COXij 7BlARGvJwTZ 0EITL 8shSql 1aTb 56N 169ZfxZzA 7Sxr 2upRQtNiVF 8J 8Xitnqr 50gD 2WqsLWJmeF 6iUdUoQe/HmB 6k 1EinbELiKQanipRv 6ikA 6n 2JW+1/ddjo 8T 5pbQz 8/OYtx 4AVEpQlzTeRCGN 8sZ 01J 6gjn/4hyiVFqXyPglv 9ujo 81Ncf/n+liYl 1xIg 9qFW/GkHN 1uLaSjm 1Q 1z 8zVXL 99s 5lc 9BmblfJs 0DRUiYy/qDurcvj 2vRw 91ZLGNIpE 7uTnqyYjbBWgAIvV 7Pomv 2pRc 7vXjw 5QV 7mE 8pbmEJkBs 0YHyfqpRMYfcetgwiWNyXppKE 3r 7CFTL 1oBdk 1uc 02mJnOOAj 4efsqNZ 3LSf 3J 3tC 2qx 9XFFT 5EJ 7MTGX+pfBdP 9SYaH 7AJlzS+mB 55X 5PonTAZQfMjcDeNrY 9pwpUWoc 60H/+4PNMum 3hBhmgJPJHxl 21o 33sx 7K 6kXNJIptwoeIEMcPYxs 9KZ 0PiN 3lXewT 8WZ 858b 39WllEZJwbgY 9bSSLbOT 3xmWuCNWNKkz 9Ke 82db 7E 24Ok 3NLT 1UUoT 0J+RbSkCENmyzhr+qa 3gpz/Mb 4Kdf 50hEqD 9FZsoYMVADDnpgIgzwrFC 9JJIAoeGLTNdOuxHUaL 0o 8k+UxfgNOOXOuLH 7JwYvV 2JOaJd 6asBOex 6h 1HUtYhUzNgFzgDqsu 9QI/S 0lJiVztFmM 39gL 69G 3jvjTzAlNb/wRWuh 7/Rt/bvkjTNmZRoh+KIsmM 1HAr 1zn 14+L+G 7VzXoELfzoEaeglRcWLKC 0aOrbrOWzFO 3F+MISpQn 4xfRVw 5Na 6r 4/7uhRQLuoAcu 9HnLyJD 7Sj/IMPHpd/8YDqtdgFSAA/6SeXHoXmIBP 77o 9EqYe+UX 5/s 9FzLXjOuLo 0Yw 9e 9wl/PaZkEynK+Kgzsct 3baZpG 0QtNK 6KInc/iDxz 7LjOu 7okX+PRq 4G 7dXpgq/KLghqKSbxRusqjzwkMv 4I 8ec+ghZ+9CioRyM 3/rgJ/Cz 7WOOgkjPmVaB 0O 8VlZ+LsqVfyr 5UozZzf 97mIsvb+RWljkYDBPKoOno 89gKMoTQA 44CqREoLvbhYGUEemqgkQekyOY 5MwR 6vhpdvkE 6qpI 9vCEhAaGj 8L 6tFSGH+oMmKpL 5QxmvQJdJUGWGtYSmf 8lHATDKRtS/YLnwf 0aNQa 4GvJBu 9zjfwRUDHyE 9vLQHGpR/6Y 3d 1aVZ 3vvaWyJT 8fPkIydIC 9pkU 9CL 16Kx 5QhzimQxghyeAszNGmNv 6gjeiK 3JGFd 2pCw 3z 4YPnTz/lj+lNP 2NTc 0kMlQ 2hM 9Yw+dWzjuSePdTIytFWBofNTXzcqkdsfsRG 90pjGVbUv/KUmtIqHNdFbjx 3IrtBkr 94kAByog 97J+UMlQtioVKmgtewihqpBbonQqjri 5qdeblQi 4/fWu 9YMVdpiaYWWcGQiUkJj 4Bm+iVf 2BIDDRgCt 6Ybr 7+6qZoc 6SigRQsMled 4ZvT 2xq 0KEVnvEpdTo 5qcaXqJ 1/mZA 9f 8WvvDuX 7YrZcyzLVlPH 9igw 3YZVKnrLX 1K 0Q/iSmWy 2x 8HyA+DOk 2KQbnlBoSnlzLL+e/mNsOPf 298N/ Mark 3DShO 13S 7qrjVE+eVVHDi 9nPHeQeJgDsPwJYrWtg 2zOpZKIP 2xAxOuyT+n 3SpTSVsXSLJmun 3QZq 0XtFbX 1oVGk 0vERuv+8ik 414yK 2lJjTI 0wu 7G 6NFsb 9UBlMGRSj 7Wuf+nZrbIKhe 9FAj 9Ko 0OhFztKmNP 2KldySwQU 5o 0DAeoQfkgJtTfcrVHYpQ 9gzxPe 7OrFC 9qE 2A 0KveuETM 0aY 2/vaWmR 5lNLkd 8RXJCbV 9KWVPw+5fWI 9GDjhMETsR 0zKG 6u 4wZobq 0bDECGvPjsj 9J 0Ib 4296cJnQ 7Y 9GPOIrEhGqyQma 88dss 6EG 7CPWVppW/7bgVUkGZAbwT 4u 2pake 4+gI 1OQjfwBVTdKhwAYtoe 7XbEZAB 4UJSNcmRxfroujWmSi 5TQOVEuE 0rnxyk 6IN 8zeD 4CUK+PlgCEtDSqisejlzfqOvn 97tu 1in 4zYVVDKETd 9kzoDCuvVRxSVDW+mpNVtrx 9JH 0XQSaHjp 1vlnvPdCTeCHPy+/bl 5fbzb 1g 2Lq 3xyL 4GPAun 9vnm 0q 3216+/cRXkamHMyhNq/ffX 7+KX 4e 0V 6Mk 4bjzmM 277dUr 9cnMv 6gbR 7qGg/n 5YrprNF 5fVCma 66maQnRQ 23TQPjl 5gbV 6JvKd 6Rv 3zdMO 3yL 31R 3sSUy/qCbfNRrjsu 1Rj 9DQKr 5GTB 2+JVghM 7JB 3C/373Nj 20GBImMP 2JPYvcar 7R 02Bdc+bj 9Ee+OUzVhv 63mJ 5ub 10L/Z 2yeMgvgOKhURA 2XI 4ZQ 8cC 15e 2XXnXxmqf+mFpSesRJQr 51oKJp 7PiZuZEAnI 5ShAc 4nDnqBRRje 4HXLs 9m 1W+kSdSAY 9vtAZgL 1P 4m 8kdoYk+KdnqgWsPjE+13rqU 3S 9PUhOoAb/eLp 5k 1gWPnAjo 1YE 9UA 8l 6AfOD 2m 4Ff 4TZjD 9qldriU 5OZyO 2P 8G 8yz/nFxESFzesv 4miXD+pmtqAfJBKeZLrApA+mwTSLAzy 5xeEF 1K 41YzE 2jRIXjYe 30J 2D 2u 2P 3uHnuy 1p+ghYlaDXpGvIY 1OTMt 1YImo+pzTXFzD/cZU/wmQjv 8OgJu 5C 1mQeCdCqVxARJf 2dpmcR/endyaE 5Nt 1fqlwZFJEs+RENcy 640cOjaWRvKQsCzB 8qf 4SmHjBHq+FxcPuNrRe 5rpuINXx 7iWABXmJ 2wE 2F 5g 6a 3Es 5sfJdVz 4Oxp 95W 1j 0U 631zqXawyuXiB/4breTzyVuHi/lHT 7qkx 7wErfQsTX 4aEX 1bREH 429hTb 0trOdpwOfTm 5/DltzeuXR 8fbtLDVZy 06cEo/uR 8wNmvoUumklfcyJNF 62ovigYGr 8vdOJ 04+9eihT 7O 6N/+Hi 42+8uzolxdIuT+9DEZVOuUOPwfuT 8gJlvoYtmMrmMAyoYV 1Tvwqij 0xHRfq 8syeO 9Qwf 8vRC 24vLUgIkuIHDtZCKF 6rgzZPo 9edQIvddsohZbSNF 2EAQpggu/hpcy 2u/dAfkkTBpBFe 7gdi 8UwmdlwgesTJMUsC 8Iv 3T 8ofJHmCfaT 6KomkwYv 599hKdakL 7yh 8ofYR 7jD 1dDRw 5WS 30kLUIhYAAMhDGAgF 8YX 0gNBr 4MAzD+LyNKNAQMhDEA 4w/jC 6nBwJdhAMb/ZUSJhoCBMAZg/GF 8ITUY+DIMwPi/jCjREDAQxoC 1zh+WFanBABhYJgPq 8P 5iNvksk+RloF 7WFpplcMoYJTb 5MBYOoIGBLAxgzp+FZlQCBvgxAOPnJxMgAgNZGIDxZ 6EZlYABfgzA+PnJBIjAQBYGYPxZaEYlYIAfAzB+fjIBIjCQhQEYfxaaUQkY 4McAjJ+fTIAIDGRhAMafhWZUAgb 4MQDj 5ycTIAIDWRiA 8WehGZWAAX 4MwPj 5yQSIwEAWBmD 8WWhGJWCAHwMwfn 4yASIwkIUBGH 8WmlEJGODHAIyfn 0yACAxkYQDGn 4VmVAIG+DEA 4+cnEyACA 1kYgPFnoRmVgAF+DMD 4+ckEiMBAFgZg/FloRiVggB 8DMH 5+MgEiMJCFARh/FppRCRjgxwCMn 59MgAgMZGEAxp+FZlQCBvgxAOPnJxMgAgNZGIDxZ 6EZlYABfgzA+PnJBIjAQBYGYPxZaEYlYIAfAzB+fjIBIjCQhQEYfxaaUQkY 4McAjJ+fTIAIDGRhAMafhWZUAgb 4MQDj 5ycTIAIDWRiA 8WehGZWAAX 4MwPj 5yQSIwEAWBmD 8WWhGJWCAHwMwfn 4yASIwkIUBGH 8WmlEJGODHAIyfn 0yACAxkYQDGn 4VmVAIG+DEA 4+cnEyACA 1kYgPFnoRmVgAF+DMD 4+ckEiMBAFgZg/FloRiVggB 8DMH 5+MgEiMJCFgXDj/3j 4fmR 9vj 98ZIFqVyJhXL 2I 3/QXGhBV 82gb 9XJllFfWYP//+8NLpzkT 2zUxuyKzI 2sTt 8V 3dHWdKkqhhnycVUfjcdfMWytiGxtu/JKd 3fOn/hwuHzfBAgsR 7kja 4+u/n 7/PqQr 8+N/jq 2zd 3+tjqiJFOZuT 4vF/dRd 5eH 89O 2v+L 2osLn+ck 7aCELola 2peKpymOj 0XW 9WpT/usSiuiG 6uNWJDdWPTAt 8P 9ma 0Q 4oez+0OZ 43nXEqf 82253VvUXMmv 5qdO 7sojfdDqV 0Kyx+m 5U 1P 6rqqHWpwaA 1Wm 5kJhg 6noN 8AYqrawCxu 65xiLy 9BRbNqHOVOdpOJPfetq 1axNqkmO 00Wyv/N 4RxKBoe 0XfkXVVTCOgumIjpa+UVVndKgR 2rR 9NRUYHYamHrQlaXrrYHgVw 6KpBraGfS 9CK 8cZa 4tfijhv 5zV 755dfN 6+k 3MU 4K 52P 7pnoB 0X 1rv/Z 1X 9yKn 36ffzz 8vDmVLsPhvrj 5VXbuziwvVxuVTpRzevPTOak 4/1012Bzzm 4yH+7cOACnu/V 1ZmgOJapEuth 74Nfiip/Biv 326UEpc 3Gw 277KpRgNroo 5/XL 49qSb/ezs 72Zxf 7F 7fD/L/L 0/7kr 0WANWufVGW 3SDvhWFKxGwInU/U 1KDpk 5ZbUar/6ivlFmDjvwY 3WhMMgbbU 499/piY 08jIKrH 40aXQp 3oK 1YrixvVTHGf 9+28z 6pcFLFSsd 5lvlLUv 5aT 93d 6Gc 8uNvp 8VeWoD 2UpxZpHXc/6eynP 8O 8L+NjMfXtw 4Am 5MzZXFdJL 381OB 7C 6+xyjLN 72//rEiI+HP 5i 3LyjyVDJRei 3LoKB 4b 6Txp 5L 4x+W 5r 6F 1PWyh 9vvEzRp 1WU 6lo 8peyDytnYEfVwktml 0aWry 9UKi 8xOY/upjjN+c 5JmmqdWlO 3eUeX 5bzH 2qm 6jmdV 1sogpsY 9mdNNYGYW 5DJTiRDJYa 0Dh 7nLOL 05ld 3h 4L 21fhgHOZG 8g/n+y 8W/vZBj+VdUpTVk 3fsTLVSnHzU 1HWH 5S 9sHhbGy 0erRr 7OrqYrXCh 0xXmjjj 76vNVBRXyEyM 5JUXq 3xg 8elkGTbbgXZaGcd 0xIFkkMKgwp 0lCet/PzROvhg 0RdDv 4elN 9QWen+kwPCsaSiYN/+6knN 8Zk/8mh 4+UB 8oXHImJkeofm 2S 1QKPVo 12jS 1cXqhWxMqUzfukC 1hNA 19pD 85vw 3BRcZxbhfb 1WIYFqGU/6Y 5UXLQMMfU 01Mn 483O 3Peq 3KgWSUPu/C+0vanLxtt 3vtl 5Yl 3oTZvpyw 1OQ 0bfTkZ 7SNngmk+Kr 5XVccvlLurevlSnCkZo 99jW 2phydsM 5lL 8RasFREMlFnojF 9OBUWAblN 6g 4+XZRzAIvz 6jwjDKV/x 9Fn 91ZlFRt 1Uwjrl+X 8ymiZ/eLqoo 7ul/OxVoSajrKF/se 7YgWSUP 9/C+wuSiAs 1ppUfMe 0vCiPYZ 3SI/atdThie/Iy 20S+BDKhUPnMjjjqri 9sRxRBxTTOEVDzrlVt 3Y 9vq 4dCE 0YY 4IC 1ZK 0bb 605wJHw 39RdhWvp 7ZGHItkwGIPplyi 0StRY 34cgfCQXZwAAYmIUBGP 8stKNSMDA/AzD++WUABGBgFgZg/LPQjkrBwPwMWAG/+eEAARgAA+kZUKF 9RPvTM 40awAAnBhDt 5yQNYAEDczCAOf 8crKNOMMCAARg/AyEAAhiYgwEY/xyso 04wwIABGD 8DIQACGJiDARj/HKyjTjDAgAEYPwMhAAIYmIMBGP 8crKNOMMCAARg/AyEAAhiYgwEY/xyso 04wwIABGD 8DIQACGJiDARj/HKyjTjDAgAEYPwMhAAIYmIMBGP 8crKNOMMCAARg/AyEAAhiYgwEY/xyso 04wwIABGD 8DIQACGJiDARj/HKyjTjDAgAEYPwMhAAIYmIMBGP 8crKNOMMCAARg/AyEAAhiYgwEY/xyso 04wwIABGD 8DIQACGJiDARj/HKyjTjDAgAEYPwMhAAIYmIMBGP 8crKNOMMCAARg/AyEAAhiYgwEY/xyso 04wwIABGD 8DIQACGJiDARj/HKyjTjDAgAEYPwMhAAIYmIMBGP 8crKNOMMCAARg/AyEAAhiYgwEY/xyso 04wwIABGD 8DIQACGJiDARj/HKyjTjDAgAEYPwMhAAIYmIMBGP 8crKNOMMCAARg/AyEAAhiYgwEY/xyso 04wwIABGD 8DIQACGJiDARj/HKyjTjDAgAEYPwMhAAIYmIMBGP 8crKNOMMCAARg/AyEAAhiYgwEY/xyso 04wwIABGD 8DIQACGJiDARh/btY/Hr 4f 6c/VS 6bqZa 12ZRYOBej 7w 0cPnG 52nVD/aSBNpkaimjAGYPxhfE 1MLQxk 83h 5+FSfw/3btt/gJlblk 333XCFR//y 9Pu 7JdXz 99/P 3uU+RSLMcBmD 8OWX 18uumuP+jTez 4+s 998X 6oEbxcVR 5BPUSLruL 71VXtKBgD 90DKMpUxqof 7FqLwq 4faPamyG 6O 6Lrvstl 6uNjevxX 7bcivE 7622GKBm 7e 9yipt 7XTD+jBJ 6edqfXf 4wR 1cxolYDqrCp 7dt 96RM 8F 40/8LovbstR+Xm 3v 1Ne+XBKUdzHw 8+b 03JMP 9yf 1bmCmrm/ Esther 9rla 5Je 7JQlX 24L 25+vRTnv 0UdhfAgTL/AhVCDqjIG 4UHiJAzA+JPQ 2lvo 6bfa 9u 2x 8eN/j 6+7W+UTnF/sXh//V 02/dxfK 296cnL 2WTsJoyqLx 0Y 9/XFa 53IDEiG 18mhH 57P 6/stbj 69vd/smMSxx/Oy 3KXwYmAk 6EPhnzigK 1wfjz 6sDbvzqmdv 5bDc 1N/doUt/sRUOMpq 65F+uQDH 3vO 3z/lN 4o 4/y 18ENVnDM 0ougj 7MupO 0OiGwucqeaX 4RWqD 8WcUpBzSmyl+p 2LTFIcNcTilNKe 7k 3IGYXUuES 39+PfWyVX 2WuU 8xPIJ 7HQuhO 6M 1a 9W 5BGxxQhZhWeB 8YdzFp/j/D 8xiW 5GTDkPrkZm 6aAbk/qBUXU 0pTTYagYhAoyDI 39fS 17ldL 6eYlTzjjJtE/hzdQtVcS 6EXhnjiUXOKAZ 0jytyW 70v/pOIgeddIyjL 79Z/OFOBv 3LcrlOY 38WoWxXhSikH 5erPu 2fxtSzByq 4Lb 2tMmVRkOdvt 1HSkW 37jS 5jIClHLMELDCWktMCaiGcX 2MaAt/UikUCogplz 6e 1Q 3gkxfgwExaxCTBq 8AwNdo 8NpaoS 0dbv/aRI/2goGKAYz 8UAUwsC 4GMPKvS 95oLRjoMgC 3H 1oBBlbKAIx/pYJHs 8EAjB 86AAZWygCMf 6WCR 7PBAIwfOgAGVsoAjH+lgkezwQCMHzoABlbKAIx/pYJHs 8EAjB 86AAZWygCMf 6WCR 7PBAIwfOgAGVsoAjH+lgkezwQCMHzoABlbKAIx/pYJHs 8EAjB 86AAZWygCMf 6WCR 7PBAIwfOgAGVsoAjH+lgkezwQCM 30MHOq 9Zr++pyYoCq+ETH+f 2f 6t 8+PFvPA 3uocLOJDB+T+bMy+YPl 4+bdb 0oVT 6/Jy 71p 7vQWzzv 27xVbr 1N 2hUIHgj 3VNLQZHi 0Y/x 1h 86LF+KH+jkL 44EMVZD 8m 3rzQlqLfuOiTq 9exVCfqkOpH 9aoXsEyfraStUo 2n+KqCmqqNkq 3Hu 3SKDqwTRbaD 3N 03ghRz 3XpVpT 87FqtaqVpsWww 2ObfeGKsaZd+ekS/J 1LRZzXExfa 4eNeWQshNNbl 5pUf/tDYuxtvbNn 6pcPodnMqe 5Ds 35UM 7pQI 6tLb 6Tf 65ncWwfvOFnaGSjSd 4mhLNqjWe 0kqbbkYW 6sLQsNCkt 0vuPLSjaXHXO 15L 8yJQU 3vDtaN 2Z 0UWjJ 7nicZlvKIUMP 4QYXeeu 6zMsv 1AVflz 59Uqy 2icWaR 9qlTO 17VqO+4+uaV 9je 6bXKZJGF 5H 5ZvoV 8DKx 7mq 18Eaz 0X/MFh 11+qqvq 9rgZ 1aai+ndlRbEMs/D 1u 1o 3ajmwsR 79rSauPHnN 9znmSZsDH 1HX 4t 2/kuteP 56gv 15O 3L 036n 38Ukeof 78O 56q 7O/cCv 95sR 4QtyTKSPZSBOaB 3qfT 2+MKIrf++JdOJ 7Ph 4e 344vmgPFPFOzYu 9qOd 6kdWcTj 3cL 6LdtvBmcxMnUDbd 7vcLvttx+2ld 7dc 3hTNkaOLkg 8X 3z 29u 9D/N+7XU 4QXs+ Hebrews 8P/6glh/BMkPPZatuNd 6r 4s 0vq 3Wz 3uj 5Vc+L/DffzttH 5xu 3phe 7hwI/3Hw 93+7PLHcRRFw 7VIGzcXTEQvc/pNVOTfrg 4ovAIeLCc 94UHAr 3fu 1zfZtgLaztey 23Fze 6prTXQ 7E 9Zp 73CbmLvx 8+4j 32bju 6jdDKh 09uPcnZBHqZGOKb 0dSGl 8hKH 3xduNUrlqGHgF 3C 96oS 0dD 3UGd 5fIAAYWzQAe 6ly 0+AAeDBAwgDk/AYkoAgwskQEY/xKlBsxggIABGD 8BiSgCDCyRASvgt 8QGADMYAAOhDMiN/UXRGH 9ofqQHA 2Bg 0QzA 7V+0+AAeDMQz 8P+83a 5vyAwBVQAAAABJRU 5ErkJggg==" id="_tx_id_base 64_AAAAAAsAAABQAGkAYwB 0AHUAcgBlACAAMQAwAAAA" width="288" height="286" style="border: 0pt none;margin:0 pt 0pt 0pt 0pt;" title="embedded image (png)" alt="[image]" />

Figure 1 - The Themes of the General Epistles

D. Summary- Finally, it is important to note that the General Epistles do not establish Church doctrine, for this was laid down in the Pauline Church Epistles. They may refer to doctrine, but they do not establish or add to it.

IX. Literary Structure and Outline

The literary structure of the third epistle of John must follow the thematic scheme of the book. It is important to note that such a breakdown of this book of the Holy Bible was not necessarily intended by the original author, but it is being used as a means of making the interpretation easier. It is hoped that this summary and outline can identify the underlying themes of the book, as well as the themes of its major divisions, sections and subsections. Then individual verses can more easily be understood in light of the emphasis of the immediate passages in which they are found.

1. Salutation (or Greeting) ( 3 John 1:1) - 3 John 1:1-4 serves as a salutation to this short epistle.

2. Praise for Hospitality ( 3 John 1:2-8) - In 3 John 1:2-8 John praises Gaius for his hospitality.

3. Warning against Sin ( 3 John 1:9-11) - In 3 John 1:9-11 John gives warnings about Diotrephes because of his sinful conduct. Benny Hinn gives us ten signs of a religious spirit in such people who behave in this manner in the Church. Jesus warned His disciples of the leaven, or doctrines, of the Pharisees and Sadducees ( Matthew 16:1-12). These were zealous groups that had religious spirits. Shortly thereafter, Peter rebukes Jesus for committing Himself to the Cross, and Jesus binds Satan from working in Peter's life ( Matthew 16:21-23). These people have a form of godliness, but deny the power thereof ( 2 Timothy 3:5).

4. Praise to Demetrius ( 3 John 1:12) - 3 John 1:12 serves as a praise to Demetrius for his good deeds.

5. Final Greeting ( 3 John 1:13-14) - 3 John 1:13-14 serves as a final greeting.

X. Outline of Book

The following outline is a summary of the preceding literary structure; thus, it reflects the theological framework of the 3John: its purpose, its three-fold thematic scheme, and its literary structure. As a result, this outline offers sermon sections that fit together into a single message that can be used by preachers and teachers to guide a congregation or class through the epistle of 3John. This journey through 3John will lead believers into one aspect of conformity to the image of Christ Jesus that was intended by the Lord, which in this book of the Holy Scriptures is to prepare Christians for a life of walking in communion with God and laying aside sins that hinder this walk by to learning to open the door to genuine ministers of God.

I. Salutation— 3 John 1:1

A. The Author— 3 John 1:1

B. The Recipient— 3 John 1:1

II. Praise for Hospitality— 3 John 1:2-8

A. The Prayer— 3 John 1:2

B. The Praise— 3 John 1:3-8

III. Warning against Sin— 3 John 1:9-11

IV. Praise to Demetrius— 3 John 1:12

V. Final Greeting— 3 John 1:13-14

BIBLIOGRAPHY

COMMENTARY BIBLIOGRAPHY

Alexander, William. The Epistles of St. John. In The Expositor's Bible. Eds. William R. Nicoll and Oscar L. Joseph. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 1956. In Ages Digital Library, v 10 [CD-ROM] Rio, WI: Ages Software, Inc, 2001.

Barker, Glenn W. 3St John. In The Expositor's Bible Commentary, vol 12. Eds. Frank E. Gaebelien, J. D. Douglas, and Dick Polcyn. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan Pub. House, 1976-1992. In Zondervan Reference Software, v 28 [CD-ROM]. Grand Rapids, MI: The Zondervan Corp, 1989-2001.

Barnes, Albert. 2John and 3John, in Barnes" Notes, Electronic Database. Seattle, WA: Hendrickson Publishers Inc, 1997. In P.C. Study Bible, v 31 [CD-ROM] Seattle, WA: Biblesoft Inc, 1993-2000.

Brooke, A. E. A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the Johannine Epistles. In The International Critical Commentary on the Holy Scriptures of the Old and New Testaments. Eds. Charles A. Briggs, Samuel R. Driver, and Alfred Plummer. Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1912.

Chapman, Benjamin C. The Third Epistle of John. In The KJV Bible Commentary. Eds. Edward E. Hindson and Woodrow M. Kroll. Nashville: Thomas Nelson Pub, 1994. In Libronix Digital Library System, v 21c [CD-ROM] Bellingham, WA: Libronix Corp, 2000-2004.

Clarke, Adam. The Third Epistle of John. in Adam Clarke"s Commentary, Electronic Database. Seattle, WA: Hendrickson Publishers Inc, 1996. in P.C. Study Bible, v 31 [CD-ROM] Seattle, WA: Biblesoft Inc, 1993-2000.

Exell, Joseph S, ed. 3John. In The Biblical Illustrator. Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Pub. House, 1954. In Ages Digital Library, v 10 [CD-ROM], Rio, WI: Ages Software, Inc, 2002.

Gill, John. "Introduction." In 3John. In John Gill's Expositor. In OnLine Bible, v 20 [CD-ROM]. Nederland: Online Bible Foundation, 1992-2005.

Henry, Matthew. 3John. In Matthew Henry"s Commentary on the Whole Bible, New Modern Edition, Electronic Database. Seattle, WA: Hendrickson Publishers, Inc, 1991. In P.C. Study Bible, v 31 [CD-ROM]. Seattle, WA: Biblesoft Inc, 1993-2000.

Jamieson, Robert. A. R. Fausset, and David Brown. The Second and Third Epistles General of John. In Jamieson, Fausset, and Brown Commentary, Electronic Database. Seattle, WA: Hendrickson Publishers Inc, 1997. In P.C. Study Bible, v 31 [CD-ROM] Seattle, WA: Biblesoft Inc, 1993-2000.

Lightfoot, J. B. Saint Paul's Epistle to the Galatians. London: Macmillian and Co, Limited, 1910.

MacDonald, William. The Third Epistle of John. In Believer's Bible Commentary. Ed. Arthur Farstad. Nashville: Thomas Nelson Pub, 1995. In Libronix Digital Library System, v 21c [CD-ROM] Bellingham, WA: Libronix Corp, 2000-2004.

MacKnight, James. A New Literal Translation from the Original Greek, of All the Apostolic Epistles, vol. iv. Edinburgh: John Ritchie.

McGee, J. Vernon. The Third Epistle of John. In Thru the Bible With J. Vernon McGee. Nashville: Thomas Nelson Pub, 1998. In Libronix Digital Library System, v 21c [CD-ROM]. Bellingham, WA: Libronix Corp, 2000-2004.

Metzger, Bruce M, David A. Hubbard, and Glenn W. Barker, eds. Word Biblical Commentary. Dallas, Texas: Word Incorporated, 1989-2007.

Pfeiffer, Charles and Everett F. Harrison, eds. The Third Epistle of John. In The Wycliffe Bible Commentary, Electronic Database. Chicago: Moody Press, c 1962. In P.C. Study Bible, v 31 [CD-ROM]. Seattle, WA: Biblesoft Inc, 1993-2000.

Plummer, Alfred, and C. Clemance. 3John. In The Pulpit Commentary. Eds. H. D. M. Spence and Joseph Exell. Grand Rapids, MI: Wm. B. Eerdmans Pub. Co, 1950. In Ages Digital Library, v 10 [CD-ROM]. Rio, WI: Ages Software, Inc, 2001.

Poole, Matthew. 3John. In Matthew Poole's New Testament Commentary. In OnLine Bible, v 20 [CD-ROM]. Nederland: Online Bible Foundation, 1992-2005.

Radmacher, Earl D, Ronald B. Allen, and H. Wayne House, eds. The Third Epistle of John. In Nelson's New Illustrated Bible Commentary. Nashville: Thomas Nelson Pub, 1999. In Libronix Digital Library System, v 21c [CD-ROM]. Bellingham, WA: Libronix Corp, 2000-2004.

GENERAL BIBLIOGRAPHY

Berkhof, Louis. Introduction to the New Testament. Grand Rapids, Michigan: Christian Classics Ethereal Library, 2002. Accessed 5 October 2008. Available from http://www.ccel.org/ccel/berkhof/newtestament.html; Internet.

Booth, Wayne C, Gregory G. Colomb, and Joseph M. Williams. The Craft of Research. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2003.

Comfort Philip W. and David P. Barrett, eds. The Text of the Earliest New Testament Greek Manuscripts Wheaton, Illinois: Tyndall House Publishers, 1999, 2001.

Cross, F. L. and E. A. Livingstone, eds. The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church, revised. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1983.

Dollar, Creflo. "Sermon." (Kampala, Uganda: Miracle Center Cathedral), 14June 2007.

Goodspeed, Edgar J. "The Epistles of John." In Introduction to the New Testament. Chicago, Illinois: University of Chicago Press, 1937. Accessed 8 September 2008. Available from http://www.earlychristianwritings.com/goodspeed/; Internet.

Gundry, Robert H. A Survey of the New Testament. Grand Rapids, Michigan: Zondervan Publishing House, 1981.

Gunkel, Hermann. The Psalm: A Form-Critical Introduction. Trans. Thomas M. Horner. In Biblical Series, vol 19. Ed. John Reumann. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Fortress Press, 1967.

Guthrie, Donald. New Testament Introduction. Downers Grove, Illinois: Intervarsity Press, 1990.

Harris, Hall. "Introduction to 1 ,2 ,3John: Authorship, Background, Opponents." In Biblical Studies Foundation. Richardson, Texas: Biblical Studies Press, 1999. [on-line]; Accessed 1September 2000. Available from http://www.bible.org; Internet.

Harrison, Everett F. Introduction to the New Testament. Grand Rapids, Michigan: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 1971.

Hayes, Norvel. Financial Dominion: How To Take Charge Of You Finances. Tulsa, Oklahoma: Harrison House, c 1986.

Hayes, Norvel. "Sermon." Word of Faith Family Church, Dallas, Texas 1989-99.

Hinn, Benny. This is Your Day. (Irving, Texas). On Trinity Broadcasting Network (Santa Ana, California). Television program.

Ksemann, Ernst. The Wandering People of God: An Investigation of the Letter to the Hebrews. Trans. Ray A. Harrisville and Irving L. Sandberg. Minneapolis, MN: Ausburg Publishing House, 1984.

Keathley, III, J. Hampton. "Introduction and Historical Setting for Elijah." (Bible.org) [on-line]. Accessed 23May 2012. Available from http://bible.org/seriespage/introduction-and-historical-setting-elijah; Internet.

Keating, Corey. The Criteria Used for Developing the New Testament Canon in the First Four Centuries of the Christian Church (2000). Accessed 15 April 2012. Available from http://www.ntgreek.org/SeminaryPapers/ChurchHistory/Criteria%20for%20Development%20of%20the%20NT%20Canon%20in%20First%20Four%20Centuries.pdf; Internet.

Ksenberger, Andreas J. Excellence: The Character of God and the Pursuit of Scholarly Virtue. Wheaton, Illinois: Crossway, 2011.

Lardner, Nathaniel. The Works of Nathaniel Lardner, 10 vols. London: Joseph Ogle Robinson, 1829, 1838.

MacLeod, David J. "The Doctrinal Center of the Book of Hebrews." Bibliotheca Sacra (July 1989): 291-300. In Libronix Digital Library System, v 21c [CD-ROM] Bellingham, WA: Libronix Corp, 2000-2004.

Malick, David. "An Introduction to the Book of 3John." In Biblical Studies Foundation. Richardson, Texas: Biblical Studies Press, 1996. [on-line]; Accessed 1September 2000. Available from http://www.bible.org; Internet.

Mauro, Philip. God's Pilgrims: Their Dangers, Their Resources, Their Rewards. London: Samuel E. Roberts, 1921.

Migne, Jacques Paul. Patrologia Graecae, 161vols. Parisiis: Excudebat Migne, 1857-66.

Migne, Jacques Paul. Patrologia Latina, 221vols. Parisiis: Excudebat Migne, 1844-55.

Roberts, Alexander and James Donaldson, eds. The Ante-Nicene Fathers. Grand Rapids, Michigan: Wm. B. Eerdmans Pub. Co, 1956. In Christian Classics Ethereal Library, v 20 [CD-ROM]. Grand Rapids, Michigan: Calvin College Campus Bookstore, 2001.

Salmon, George. "The Keynote to the Epistle of the Hebrews." In The Expositor, second series, vol 3. Ed. Samuel Cox. London: Hodder and Stoughton, 1882.

Sanday, W. The Cheltenham List of the Canonical Books of the Old and New Testament and the Writings of Cyprian, in Studia Biblica ed Ecclesiastica: Essays Chiefly in Biblical and Patristic Criticism, vol 3. Oxford: The Clarendon Press, 1891.

Saydon, P. P. "The Master Idea of the Epistle to the Hebrews." Melita Theologica XIII, no 1-2 (1961) 19-26.

Schaff, Philip. History of the Christian Church, vol 1: Apostolic Christianity A.D 1-100. Grand Rapids, Michigan: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 1955.

Schreiner, Thomas R. Interpreting the Pauline Epistles, second edition. Grand Rapids, Michigan: Baker Academic, c 1990, 2011.

Sophronius. The Life of the Evangelist John. In Orthodox Classics in English. House Springs, MO: The Chrysostom Press [on-line]. Accessed 1December 2010. Available from http://www.chrysostompress.org/the-four-evangelists; Internet.

Stott, John R. W. The Epistles Of John. In The Bible Speaks Today. Grand Rapids, Michigan: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co, 1982.

Streeter, B. H. The Four Gospels, rev. ed. London: Macmillan, 1930.

Tatlock, Jessie M. Greek and Roman Mythology. New York; The Century Company, c 1917.

Wace, Henry and Philip Schaff, eds. A Select Library of the Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers of the Christian Church. Grand Rapids, Michigan: Wm. B. Eerdmans Pub. Co, 1956. In Christian Classics Ethereal Library, v 20 [CD-ROM]. Grand Rapids, Michigan: Calvin College Campus Bookstore, 2001.

Westcott, Brooke Foss. A General Survey of the History of the Canon of the New Testament, fourth edition. London: Macmillan and Co, 1875.

Lectionary Calendar
Monday, October 14th, 2019
the Week of Proper 23 / Ordinary 28
ADVERTISEMENT
Commentary Navigator
Search This Commentary
Enter query in the box below
ADVERTISEMENT
To report dead links, typos, or html errors or suggestions about making these resources more useful use our convenient contact form
Powered by Lightspeed Technology