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Historical Writings

Today in Christian History

Saturday, March 27

853
Death of Haymo, a Saxon monk and scholar, and founder of the library of Halberstadt.
1378
Death of Pope Gregory XI, the last internationally-agreed-upon pope to reign in Avignon. Antipopes will reign there, however, because rivalries for the papacy after his death will result in the "Great Schism," in which popes and antipopes vie for control of Christendom.
1555
Nineteen-year-old William Hunter is burned to death in Brentwood, England, for refusing to accept the Catholic dogma of transubstantiation. He had resisted both threats and bribes.
1840
Scottish clergyman Robert Murray McCheyne wrote in a letter: 'No person can be a child of God without living in secret prayer; and no community of Christians can be in a lively condition without unity in prayer.'
1920
Death of Francis Nathan Peloubet, American Congregational clergyman known for his annual volumes of Select Notes on the International Sunday School Lessons.
1921
The first Southern Baptist church to be constituted in the state of Arizona was organized in Phoenix formed principally of churchmen who protested the doctrinal views held by leaders of the Northern Baptist Convention.
1930
Bolsheviks shoot Basil Feofanovich Infantyev, a priest of the Bratskaya Church, for "anti-Soviet activity" because he had opposed communist renovations in the teaching and practice of the Russian Orthodox Church. They will harrass his widow after his execution.
1962
In Louisiana, Archbishop Joseph Francis Rummel ordered all Roman Catholic schools in the New Orleans diocese to end segregation.
1981
Alfred Selepe, Nazarene church-planter, pastor, and evangelist in South Africa is attacked by two young men, probably gangsters, and suffers eleven stab wounds but will recover after treatment.
1993
Security officers in Shaanxi Province, China, descend on a house church and beat the leaders. They then force the lay Christians to beat the leaders, too. They beat and expose some of the church's women, hang some Christians from beams and beat them again, before forcing Lai Manping and several other badly-beaten Christians to crawl eighteen miles to a police station. Fearing than Lai will die in custody, they order him to leave. He is found dead on a roadside, having tried to crawl home.

Copyright Statement
© 1987-2020, William D. Blake. Portions used by permission of the author, from "Almanac of the Christian Church"