corner graphic   Hi,    
ver. 2.0.19.10.14
Finding the new version too difficult to understand? Go to classic.studylight.org/

Bible Commentaries

Gary H. Everett's Study Notes on the Holy Scriptures
1 Chronicles

Chapter 1 Chapter 2 Chapter 4 Chapter 7
Chapter 9 Chapter 10 Chapter 11 Chapter 12
Chapter 13 Chapter 14 Chapter 15 Chapter 16
Chapter 17 Chapter 18 Chapter 21 Chapter 22
Chapter 23 Chapter 25 Chapter 28 Chapter 29

Book Overview - 1 Chronicles

by Gary H. Everett

STUDY NOTES ON THE HOLY SCRIPTURES

Using a Theme-based Approach

to Identify Literary Structures

By Gary H. Everett

THE BOOKS OF 1AND 2CHRONICLES

January 2013Edition

All Scripture quotations in English are taken from the King James Version unless otherwise noted. Some words have been emphasized by the author of this commentary using bold or italics.

All Old Testament Scripture quotations in the Hebrew text are taken from Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia: With Westminster Hebrew Morphology, electronic ed, Stuttgart; Glenside PA: German Bible Society, Westminster Seminary, 1996, c 1925, morphology c 1991, in Libronix Digital Library System, v 21c [CD-ROM] Bellingham, WA: Libronix Corp, 2000-2004.

All New Testament Scripture quotations in the Greek text are taken from Greek New Testament, Fourth Revised Edition (with Morphology), eds. Kurt Aland, Matthew Black, Carlo M. Martini, Bruce M. Metzger, M. Robinson, and Allen Wikgren, Stuttgart: Deutsche Bibelgesellschaft (United Bible Societies), c 1966, 1993, 2006, in Libronix Digital Library System, v 21c [CD-ROM] Bellingham, WA: Libronix Corp, 2000-2004.

All Hebrew and Greek text for word studies are taken from James Strong in The New Strong"s Dictionary of Hebrew and Greek Words, Nashville: Thomas Nelson, c 1996, 1997, in Libronix Digital Library System, v 21c [CD-ROM] Bellingham, WA: Libronix Corp, 2000-2004.

The Crucifixion image on the book cover was created by the author's daughter Victoria Everett in 2012.

Gary H. Everett, 1981-2013

All rights reserved. No part of this work may be reproduced, stored, or transmitted in any form without prior permission of the author.

Foundational Theme - How to Serve the Lord with All Our Strength

Hear, O Israel: The LORD our God is one LORD:

And thou shalt love the LORD thy God with all thine heart,

and with all thy soul, and with all thy might.

Deuteronomy 6:4-5

INTRODUCTION TO THE BOOKS OF 1AND 2CHRONICLES

Study Notes on the Holy Scriptures supports the view of the verbal, plenary inspiration of the biblical text of the Holy Scriptures, meaning that every word originally written down by the authors in the sixty-six books of the Holy Canon were God-breathed when recorded by men, and that the Scriptures are therefore inerrant and infallible. Any view less than this contradicts the testimony of the Holy Scriptures themselves. For this reason, the Holy Scriptures contain both divine attributes and human attributes. While textual criticism engages with the variant readings of the biblical text, acknowledging its human attributes, faith in His Word acknowledges its divine attributes. These views demand the adherence of mankind to the supreme authority of the Holy Scriptures above all else. The Holy Scriptures can only be properly interpreted by the guidance of the Holy Spirit, an aspect of biblical scholarship that is denied by liberal views, causing much misunderstanding and misinterpretation of the Holy Scriptures.

The Message of the Books of 1,2Chronicles- The books of 1,2Chronicles are narrative literature that abounds with long lists of names and genealogies. We might ask the redemptive purpose such a list of names. The Lord spoke to Greg Mohr and said, "Every name has an inheritance in Me, and everyone who has an inheritance is worth naming in My Word." 1] Each of the names in 1,2Chronicles reflects God's blessings upon mankind in some form or the other.

1] Greg Mohr, "Sermon," Calvary Cathedral International, Fort Worth, Texas, 27 July 2011.

In addition, Helen Milton makes the interesting observation that the phrase in Matthew's genealogy "and from David until the carrying away into Babylon are fourteen generations" ( Matthew 1:17) reflects the narrative material found in the two books of Chronicles. Although the books open with lengthy genealogies and close with a brief comment concerning Israel's return from their captivity during the reign of King Cyrus, these books offer narrative history from the beginning to the end of Israel's kingdom, a period noted in the opening genealogy of Matthew's Gospel as divinely orchestrated by God. Thus, the author of Chronicles viewed this period of Jewish History as divinely significant to Israel's redemption. 2] Despite man's failures recorded in the historical books of Chronicles, God's grace abounded upon mankind throughout his redemptive history.

2] Helen Milton, "The Structure of the Prologue to St. Matthew's Gospel," in Journal of Biblical Literature 812 (June 1962): 175.

Introductory Material- The introduction to the books of 1,2Chronicles will deal with its historical setting, literary style, and theological framework. 3] These three aspects of introductory material will serve as an important foundation for understanding God's message to us today from these divinely inspired books of the Holy Scriptures.

3] Someone may associate these three categories with Hermann Gunkel's well-known three-fold approach to form criticism when categorizing the genre found within the book of Psalm: (1) "a common setting in life," (2) "thoughts and mood," (3) "literary forms." In addition, the Word Biblical Commentary uses "Form/Structure/Setting" preceding each commentary section. Although such similarities were not intentional, but rather coincidental, the author was aware of them and found encouragement from them when assigning the three-fold scheme of historical setting, literary style, and theological framework to his introductory material. See Hermann Gunkel, The Psalm: A Form-Critical Introduction, trans. Thomas M. Horner, in Biblical Series, vol 19, ed. John Reumann (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Fortress Press, 1967), 10; see also Word Biblical Commentary, eds. Bruce M. Metzger, David A. Hubbard, and Glenn W. Barker (Dallas, Texas: Word Incorporated, 1989-2007).

HISTORICAL SETTING

"We dare not divorce our study from understanding the historical setting of every passage of Scripture

if we are going to come to grips with the truth and message of the Bible."

(J. Hampton Keathley) 4]

4] J. Hampton Keathley, III, "Introduction and Historical Setting for Elijah," (Bible.org) [on-line]; accessed 23May 2012; available from http://bible.org/seriespage/introduction-and-historical-setting-elijah; Internet.

Each book of the Holy Scriptures is cloaked within a unique historical setting. An examination of this setting is useful in the interpretation of the book because it provides the context of the passage of Scripture under examination. The section on the historical setting of the books of 1,2Chronicles will provide a discussion on its title, historical background, authorship, date and place of writing, recipients, and occasion. This discussion supports the Jewish tradition that Ezra the scribe was the most likely author of the books of 1,2Chronicles.

I. The Title

There are a number of ancient titles associated with the two books of Chronicles.

A. The Ancient Jewish Title "Record of Days" - The books of 1,2Chronicles was originally one book. Origen tells us that Chronicle s was known by the ancient Jewish title " δαβρὴ À ϊαμὶμ ," 5] a transliteration of ( הימים דברי), pronounced "Dibh"re Hayyamim" and meaning, "Record of Days," 6] "Book of the Events of the Time," 7] or simplified to "Diaries," 8] Jerome recognized this title in his Prologus Galeatus. 9] This ancient Hebrew title ( הימים דברי) can still be found in the modern, standard work Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia. 10]

5] See PG v 20, Colossians 581A.

6] Eusebius writes, "of the Chronicles, the First and Second in one, Dabreiamein, that Isaiah , ‘Records of days';" (Eusebius, Ecclesiastical History 6252) Eusebius, Ecclesiastical History, trans. Arthur C. McGiffert under the title The Church History of Eusebius, in A Select Library of Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers of the Christian Church, A New Series, vol 1, eds. Henry Wace and Philip Schaff (Oxford: Parker and Company, c 1890, 1905), 272.

7] C. F. Keil, The Books of Chronicles, in Biblical Commentary on the Old Testament (Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1872), 9.

8] Henry B. Swete, An Introduction to Old Testament in Greek (Cambridge: University Press, 1902), 215-216.

9] See Jerome's preface to the book of Kings, also called the Prologus Galeatus (NPN 2v 6.

10] Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia, eds. A. Alt, O. Eifelt, P. Kahle, and R. Kittle (Stuttgart: Deutsche Bibelstiftung, c 1967-77).

B. The Ancient LXX Title "Omissions" - The division of Chronicles into two separate books took place when the Old Testament was translated into the LXX. 11] The LXX used the Greek title " παραλειπομένων " for these two books, which means, "Omissions," that Isaiah , "things that were left out." From this Greek title the Vulgate transliterates the book's title as "Paralipomenon." 12] Henry Swete and George Gray believe the Greek titles of the Old Testament are "of Alexandrian and pre-Christian origin." 13] Melito, bishop of Sardis (d. c 190) used this Greek title in his list of the Old Testament canon. 14] Swete says these ancient Greek titles are found to vary in ancient Greek codices of the Bible, one such example being " παραλειπομένων τῶν βασιλειῶν ἰούδα." Jerome refers to the book using its Latin name "Paralipomenon" on a number of occasions. 15]

11] C. F. Keil, The Books of Chronicles, in Biblical Commentary on the Old Testament (Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1872), 9.

12] Biblia Sacra juxta Vulgatam Clementinam (Ed. electronica), in Libronix Digital Library System, v 21c [CD-ROM] (Bellingham, WA: Logos Research Systems, Inc, 2005).

13] Henry B. Swete, An Introduction to Old Testament in Greek (Cambridge: University Press, 1902), 214-215; George B. Gray, A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on Numbers , in The International Critical Commentary on the Holy Scriptures of the Old and New Testaments, eds. Charles A. Briggs, Samuel R. Driver, and Alfred Plummer (New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1903), xxi.

14] Eusebius writes, "‘I learned accurately the books of the Old Testament, and send them to thee as written below. Their names are as follows: Of Moses, five books: Genesis ,, Exodus ,, Numbers ,, Leviticus , Deuteronomy; Jesus Nave, Judges , Ruth; of Kings, four books; of Chronicles, two; the Psalm of David; the Proverbs of Song of Solomon , Wisdom also, Ecclesiastes ,, Song of Solomon , Job; of Prophets, Isaiah , Jeremiah; of the twelve prophets, one book; Daniel ,, Ezekiel , Esdras. From which also I have made the extracts, dividing them into six books.' Such are the words of Melito." Eusebius, Ecclesiastical History 42614, trans. Arthur C. McGiffert under the title The Church History of Eusebius, in A Select Library of Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers of the Christian Church, A New Series, vol 1, eds. Henry Wace and Philip Schaff, (Oxford: Parker and Company, c 1890, 1905), 206.

15] Jerome writes, "The same conduct is in the Chronicles [Paralopomenon] attributed to Prayer of Manasseh , and in the book of the prophet Jonah to Nineveh, and in the gospel to the publican." (Epistle to Oceanus 774) (PLv 22, Colossians 693) (NPN 2v 6) He also mentions the book by the name "Paralipomenon" in his Synopsis Divinae Bibliothecae (see PLv 28, Colossians 175).

C. The Modern English Title "Chronicles" - Today, English bibles use the title "Chronicles," which finds its origin the fact that Jerome better described this book as a "chronicon" by referring first to its Hebrew title, then to its Greek title, thus, establishing the tradition of the title "Chronicles." 16]

16] In his preface to the book of Kings, also called the Prologus Galeatus, Jerome writes, "…the seventh, Dabre Aiamim, that Isaiah , Words of Days, which we may more expressively call a chronicle [chronicon] of the whole of the sacred history, the book that amongst us is called First and Second Chronicles[Paralopomenon]…" (Prefaces to the Books of the Vulgate Version of the Old Testament) (NPN 2v 6). See C. F. Keil, The Books of Chronicles, in Biblical Commentary on the Old Testament (Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1872), 10.

II. Historical Background

A. The Source of Historical Material Recorded in the Books of Chronicles- Many other royal chronicles were written during this period in history by the kings of other nations ( Esther 10:2).

Esther 10:2, "And all the acts of his power and of his might, and the declaration of the greatness of Mordecai, whereunto the king advanced him, are they not written in the book of the chronicles of the kings of Media and Persia?"

III. Authorship

A. Internal Evidence -

B. External Evidence- If we look outside of biblical literature for clues to authorship and into other ancient Jewish literature from which much Jewish tradition is found, the Babylonian Talmud says that Ezra wrote his book and Chronicles, and Nehemiah ben Chachalyah finished his work.

"And who wrote all the books? Moses wrote his book and a portion of Bil'am , xxii.], and Job. Jehoshua wrote his book and the last eight verses of the Pentateuch beginning: "And Moses, the servant of the Lord, died." Samuel wrote his book, Judges , and Ruth. David wrote Psalm , with the assistance of ten elders, viz.: Adam the First, Malachi Zedek, Abraham, Moses, Hyman, Jeduthun, Asaph, and the three sons of Korach. Jeremiah wrote his book, Kings, and Lamentations. King Hezekiah and his company wrote Isaiah ,, Proverbs ,, Song of Solomon , and Ecclesiastes. The men of the great assembly wrote Ezekiel , the Twelve Prophets, Daniel , and the Book of Esther. Ezra wrote his book, and Chronicles the order of all generations down to himself. [This may be a support to Rabh's theory, as to which, R. Jehudah said in his name, that Ezra had not ascended from Babylon to Palestine until he wrote his genealogy.] And who finished Ezra's book? Nehemiah ben Chachalyah." (Babylonian Talmud, Tract Baba Bathra (Last Gate), 1.Mishna 5) 17]

17] Michael L. Rodkinson, New Edition of the Babylonian Talmud, vol 13 (New York: New Talmud Publishing Company, 1902), 45.

IV. Date

There are a number of passages within the book of 1,2Chronicles that helps in dating this writing.

A. Internal Evidence-

1. References to the Babylonian Captivity - The books of Chronicles contain references to the Babylonian Captivity.

1 Chronicles 5:22, "For there fell down many slain, because the war was of God. And they dwelt in their steads until the captivity."

1 Chronicles 5:26, "And the God of Israel stirred up the spirit of Pul king of Assyria, and the spirit of Tilgathpilneser king of Assyria, and he carried them away, even the Reubenites,

and the Gadites, and the half tribe of Prayer of Manasseh , and brought them unto Halah, and Habor, and Hara, and to the river Gozan, unto this day.

1 Chronicles 6:15, "And Jehozadak went into captivity, when the LORD carried away Judah and Jerusalem by the hand of Nebuchadnezzar."

1 Chronicles 9:1, "So all Israel were reckoned by genealogies; and, behold, they were written in the book of the kings of Israel and Judah, who were carried away to Babylon for their transgression."

2. References to the Return of the Jews from Babylonian Captivity - The books of Chronicles contain references to the return of the Jews from Babylonian Captivity.

a) Note the late chronology of David's descendants in 1 Chronicles 3:17-24, who were born during and after the Babylonian Captivity. For example, Zerubbabel led in the return of the deportation from Babylon to Jerusalem.

b) The book of 2Chronicles ends with mentions the return of Israel from the Babylonian captivity under the decree of Cyprus, king of Persia, which took place in 536 B.C. ( 2 Chronicles 36:22-23):

3. The Phrase "Unto this Day" - Note the phrase, "Unto this day" used throughout the books of 1,2Chronicles.

1 Chronicles 4:41, "And these written by name came in the days of Hezekiah king of Judah, and smote their tents, and the habitations that were found there, and destroyed them utterly unto this day, and dwelt in their rooms: because there was pasture there for their flocks."

1 Chronicles 4:43, "And they smote the rest of the Amalekites that were escaped, and dwelt there unto this day."

1 Chronicles 5:26, "And the God of Israel stirred up the spirit of Pul king of Assyria, and the spirit of Tilgathpilneser king of Assyria, and he carried them away, even the Reubenites, and the Gadites, and the half tribe of Prayer of Manasseh , and brought them unto Halah, and Habor, and Hara, and to the river Gozan, unto this day."

2 Chronicles 5:9, "And they drew out the staves of the ark, that the ends of the staves were seen from the ark before the oracle; but they were not seen without. And there it is unto this day."

2 Chronicles 8:8, "But of their children, who were left after them in the land, whom the children of Israel consumed not, them did Solomon make to pay tribute until this day."

2 Chronicles 10:19, "And Israel rebelled against the house of David unto this day."

2 Chronicles 20:26, "And on the fourth day they assembled themselves in the valley of Berachah; for there they blessed the LORD: therefore the name of the same place was called, The valley of Berachah, unto this day."

2 Chronicles 21:10, "So the Edomites revolted from under the hand of Judah unto this day. The same time also did Libnah revolt from under his hand; because he had forsaken the LORD God of his fathers."

2 Chronicles 35:25, "And Jeremiah lamented for Josiah: and all the singing men and the singing women spake of Josiah in their lamentations to this day, and made them an ordinance in Israel: and, behold, they are written in the lamentations."

B. External Evidence - We find references to the books of Chronicles in extra-biblical literature.

1. The Book of Sirach Refers to 1Chronicles- J. Barton Payne believes that the book of Sirach (200 B.C.) "draws on" 1 Chronicles 23-29, so that the Chronicles must have been written at an earlier date. 18]

18] J. Barton Payne, Ezra -, Nehemiah , in The Expositor's Bible Commentary, vol 4, eds. Frank E. Gaebelien, J. D. Douglas, Dick Polcyn (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan Pub. House, 1976-1992), in Zondervan Reference Software, v 28 [CD-ROM] (Grand Rapids, MI: The Zondervan Corp, 1989-2001), "Introduction: 6. Date."

Sirach 47:8-10, "In all his works he praised the Holy One most high with words of glory; with his whole heart he sung Song of Solomon , and loved him that made him. He set singers also before the altar, that by their voices they might make sweet melody, and daily sing praises in their songs. He beautified their feasts, and set in order the solemn times until the end, that they might praise his holy name, and that the temple might sound from morning. The Lord took away his sins, and exalted his horn for ever: he gave him a covenant of kings, and a throne of glory in Israel."

V. Recipients

VI. Occasion

LITERARY STYLE (GENRE)

"Perhaps the most important issue in interpretation is the issue of genre.

If we misunderstand the genre of a text, the rest of our analysis will be askew."

(Thomas Schreiner) 19]

19] Thomas R. Schreiner, Interpreting the Pauline Epistles, second edition (Grand Rapids, Michigan: Baker Academic, c 1990, 2011), 11.

Within the historical setting of the Kingdom of Israel, the author of the books of 1,2Chronicles chose to write using the literary style of the historical narrative. Thus, the books of 1,2Chronicles is assigned to the literary genre called "historical narrative literature."

A. Emphasis Upon the Davidic Lineage- The genealogies of the first nine books of 1Chronicles place emphasis on the lineage of David. Throughout the books of Chronicles more emphasis is given to the kings of Judah than to the kings of northern Israel.

B. Emphasis Upon the Office of the Prophet- 1,2Kings place emphasis on the office of the prophets, while Chronicles gives less emphasis to the ministry of the prophets.

C. Emphasis Upon Temple Worship- The books of 1,2Chronicles place much emphasis on the Temple and Israelite worship.

THEOLOGICAL FRAMEWORK

"Scholarly excellence requires a proper theological framework."

(Andreas Ksenberger) 20]

20] Andreas J. Ksenberger, Excellence: The Character of God and the Pursuit of Scholarly Virtue (Wheaton, Illinois: Crossway, 2011), 161.

Based upon the historical setting and literary style of the books of 1,2Chronicles, an examination of the purpose, thematic scheme, and literary structure to this book of the Holy Scriptures will reveal its theological framework. This introductory section will sum up its theological framework in the form of an outline, which is then used to identify smaller units or pericopes within the books of 1,2Chronicles for preaching and teaching passages of Scripture while following the overriding message of the book. Following this outline allows the minister of the Gospel of Jesus Christ to take his followers on a spiritual journey that brings them to the same destination that the author intended his readers to reach.

VII. Purpose

VIII. Themtic Scheme

The prophecy by Hannah in 1 Samuel 2:1-10 reflects the theme of the books of Samuel, Kings and Chronicles. God lifts up the humble men or nations and brings the proud low.

IX. Literary Structure

X. Outline of Book

BIBLIOGRAPHY

COMMENTARY BIBLIOGRAPHY

Anderson, A. A. 2Samuel. In Word Biblical Commentary: 58 Volumes on CD- Romans , Vol 11. Eds. Bruce M. Metzger, David A. Hubbard and Glenn W. Barker. Dallas: Word Inc, 2002. In Libronix Digital Library System, v 21c [CD-ROM] Bellingham, WA: Libronix Corp, 2000-2004.

Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia. Eds. A. Alt, O. Eifelt, P. Kahle, and R. Kittle. Stuttgart: Deutsche Bibelstiftung, c 1967-77.

Braun, Roddy L. 1Chronicles. In Word Biblical Commentary: 58 Volumes on CD- Romans , vol 14. Eds. Bruce M. Metzger, David A. Hubbard and Glenn W. Barker. Dallas: Word Inc, 2002. In Libronix Digital Library System, v 21c [CD-ROM] Bellingham, WA: Libronix Corp, 2000-2004.

Gill, John. 1Chronicles. In John Gill's Expositor. In e-Sword, v 777 [CD-ROM] Franklin, Tennessee: e-Sword, 2000-2005.

Gray, George B. A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on Numbers. In The International Critical Commentary on the Holy Scriptures of the Old and New Testaments. Eds Charles A. Briggs, Samuel R. Driver, and Alfred Plummer. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1903.

Hobbs, T. R. 2Kings. In Word Biblical Commentary: 58 Volumes on CD- Romans , vol 13. Eds. Bruce M. Metzger, David A. Hubbard and Glenn W. Barker. Dallas: Word Inc, 2002. In Libronix Digital Library System, v 21c [CD-ROM] Bellingham, WA: Libronix Corp, 2000-2004.

Jamieson, Robert and A. R. Fausset, and David Brown. 1Corinthians. In Jamieson, Fausset, and Brown Commentary, Electronic Database. Seattle, WA: Hendrickson Publishers Inc, 1997. In P.C. Study Bible, v 31 [CD-ROM] Seattle, WA: Biblesoft Inc, 1993-2000.

Keil, C. F. The Books of Chronicles, in Biblical Commentary on the Old Testament. Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1872.

Klein, Ralph W. 1Samuel. In Word Biblical Commentary: 58 Volumes on CD- Romans , vol 10. Eds. Bruce M. Metzger, David A. Hubbard and Glenn W. Barker. Dallas: Word Inc, 2002. In Libronix Digital Library System, v 21c [CD-ROM] Bellingham, WA: Libronix Corp, 2000-2004.

Metzger, Bruce M, David A. Hubbard, and Glenn W. Barker, eds. Word Biblical Commentary. Dallas, Texas: Word Incorporated, 1989-2007.

GENERAL BIBLIOGRAPHY

Athanasius. Festal Letters. Trans. Archibald Robertson. In Select Writings and Letters of Athanasius, Bishop of Alexandria. In A Select Library of Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers of the Christian Church, A New Series, vol 4. Eds. Henry Wace and Philip Schaff. Oxford: Parker and Company, c 1891.

Balcer, Jack Martin. "Cyrus the Great." In The World Book Encyclopedia, vol 4. Chicago: World Book, Inc, 1994.

Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia. Eds. A. Alt, O. Eifelt, P. Kahle, and R. Kittle. Stuttgart: Deutsche Bibelstiftung, c 1967-77.

Biblia Sacra juxta Vulgatam Clementinam (Ed. electronica). In Libronix Digital Library System, v 21c [CD-ROM] Bellingham, WA: Logos Research Systems, Inc, 2005.

Eusebius, Ecclesiastical History. Trans. Arthur C. McGiffert under the title The Church History of Eusebius. In A Select Library of Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers of the Christian Church, A New Series, vol 1. Eds. Henry Wace and Philip Schaff. Oxford: Parker and Company, c 1890, 1905.

Fulton, A. S. "Ophir." In International Standard Bible Encyclopedia. Ed. James Orr. Grand Rapids, Michigan: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co, c 1915, 1939. In The Sword Project, v 1511 [CD-ROM] Temple, AZ: CrossWire Bible Society, 1990-2008.

Ginsberg, Louis. "Adam." In The Jewish Encyclopedia, vol 1. Ed. Isidore Singer. New York: Funk and Wagnalls Company, 1901.

Ginzberg, Louis. Legend of the Jews, vol 1. Trans. Henrietta Szold. Philadelphia, PA: The Jewish Publication of America, 1909.

Gunkel, Hermann. The Psalm: A Form-Critical Introduction. Trans. Thomas M. Horner. In Biblical Series, vol 19. Ed. John Reumann. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Fortress Press, 1967.

Hagin, Kenneth. Plans Pursuits and Purposes. Tulsa, Oklahoma: Faith Library Publications, c 1988, 1993.

Hunter, S. F. "Peleg," In International Standard Bible Encyclopedia. Ed. James Orr. Grand Rapids, Michigan: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co, c 1915, 1939. In The Sword Project, v 1511 [CD-ROM] Temple, AZ: CrossWire Bible Society, 1990-2008.

Keathley, III, J. Hampton. "Introduction and Historical Setting for Elijah." (Bible.org) [on-line]. Accessed 23May 2012. Available from http://bible.org/seriespage/introduction-and-historical-setting-elijah; Internet.

Ksenberger, Andreas J. Excellence: The Character of God and the Pursuit of Scholarly Virtue. Wheaton, Illinois: Crossway, 2011.

Lightfoot, John. The Whole Works of the Rev. John Lightfoot, D.D, vol 4. Ed. John Rogers Pitman. London: J. F. Dove, 1822.

Milton, Helen. "The Structure of the Prologue to St. Matthew's Gospel." In Journal of Biblical Literature 812 (June 1962): 175-181.

Mohr, Greg "Sermon." Calvary Cathedral International. Fort Worth, Texas, 27 July 2011.

Rodkinson, Michael L. "Tract Yomah (Day of Atonment)." In New Edition of the Babylonian Talmud, vol 6. Boston: New Talmud Publishing Company, 1903.

Roberts, Frances J. Come Away My Beloved. Ojai, California: King's Farspan, Inc, 1973.

Rodkinson, Michael L. New Edition of the Babylonian Talmud, vol 13. New York: New Talmud Publishing Company, 1902.

Sailhamer, John H. Introduction to Old Testament Theology. Grand Rapids, Michigan: Zondervan Publishing House, c 1995.

Schreiner, Thomas R. Interpreting the Pauline Epistles, second edition. Grand Rapids, Michigan: Baker Academic, c 1990, 2011.

Seligsohn, Max "Moriah." In The Jewish Encyclopedia, vol 9. Ed. Isidore Singer. New York: KTAV Publishing House, no date.

Swete, Henry B. An Introduction to Old Testament in Greek. Cambridge: University Press, 1902.

Taylor, Jack. The Hallelujah Factor, revised edition. Mansfield, PA: Kingdom Publishing, c 1983, 1999.

"Ziz, Ascent of." In International Standard Bible Encyclopedia. Ed. James Orr. Grand Rapids, Michigan: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co, c 1915, 1939. In The Sword Project, v 1511 [CD-ROM] Temple, AZ: CrossWire Bible Society, 1990-2008.

Lectionary Calendar
Monday, October 14th, 2019
the Week of Proper 23 / Ordinary 28
ADVERTISEMENT
Commentary Navigator
Search This Commentary
Enter query in the box below
ADVERTISEMENT
To report dead links, typos, or html errors or suggestions about making these resources more useful use our convenient contact form
Powered by Lightspeed Technology