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Bible Commentaries

Gary H. Everett's Study Notes on the Holy Scriptures

Current Book: Psalms

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Introduction Chapter 1 Chapter 2 Chapter 3
Chapter 4 Chapter 5 Chapter 6 Chapter 7
Chapter 8 Chapter 9 Chapter 10 Chapter 11
Chapter 13 Chapter 14 Chapter 15 Chapter 16
Chapter 17 Chapter 18 Chapter 19 Chapter 20
Chapter 22 Chapter 23 Chapter 24 Chapter 25
Chapter 26 Chapter 27 Chapter 28 Chapter 29
Chapter 30 Chapter 31 Chapter 32 Chapter 33
Chapter 34 Chapter 35 Chapter 36 Chapter 37
Chapter 39 Chapter 40 Chapter 41 Chapter 42
Chapter 44 Chapter 45 Chapter 46 Chapter 47
Chapter 48 Chapter 49 Chapter 50 Chapter 51
Chapter 52 Chapter 53 Chapter 54 Chapter 55
Chapter 56 Chapter 57 Chapter 58 Chapter 59
Chapter 60 Chapter 61 Chapter 62 Chapter 63
Chapter 64 Chapter 66 Chapter 67 Chapter 68
Chapter 69 Chapter 70 Chapter 71 Chapter 72
Chapter 73 Chapter 75 Chapter 77 Chapter 78
Chapter 79 Chapter 80 Chapter 81 Chapter 82
Chapter 83 Chapter 84 Chapter 85 Chapter 86
Chapter 87 Chapter 88 Chapter 89 Chapter 90
Chapter 91 Chapter 92 Chapter 93 Chapter 94
Chapter 95 Chapter 96 Chapter 97 Chapter 98
Chapter 99 Chapter 100 Chapter 101 Chapter 102
Chapter 103 Chapter 104 Chapter 105 Chapter 106
Chapter 107 Chapter 108 Chapter 109 Chapter 110
Chapter 111 Chapter 112 Chapter 113 Chapter 114
Chapter 115 Chapter 116 Chapter 117 Chapter 118
Chapter 119 Chapter 120 Chapter 121 Chapter 122
Chapter 124 Chapter 125 Chapter 126 Chapter 127
Chapter 128 Chapter 129 Chapter 130 Chapter 131
Chapter 132 Chapter 133 Chapter 134 Chapter 135
Chapter 136 Chapter 137 Chapter 138 Chapter 139
Chapter 140 Chapter 141 Chapter 142 Chapter 143
Chapter 145 Chapter 146 Chapter 147 Chapter 148
Chapter 149 Chapter 150

Book Overview - Psalms

Name. The Hebrew word means praises or hymns, while the Greek word means psalms. It may well be called the "Hebrew Prayer and Praise Book." The prevailing note is one of praise, though some are sad and plaintive while others are philosophical.

Authors. Of the 150 Psalms, there is no means of determining the authorship of 50. The authors named for others are David, Asaph, the sons of Korah, Herman, Ethan, Moses and Solomon. Of the 100 whose authorship is indicated, David is credited with 73, and in the New Testament he alone is referred to as the author of them. Lu. 20:42.

Relation to the Other Old Testament Books. It has been called the heart of the entire Bible, but its relation to the Old Testament is especially intimate. All divine manifestations are viewed in regard to their bearing on the inner experience. History is interpreted in the light of a passion for truth and righteousness and as showing forth the nearness of our relation to God.

The Subjects of the Psalms. It is very difficult to make any sort of classification of the Psalms and any classification is open to criticism. For this reason many groupings have been suggested. The following, taken from different sources, may be of help. (1) Hymns of praise, 8, 18, 19, 104, 145, 147, etc. (2) National hymns, 105, 106, 114, etc. (3) Temple hymns or hymns for public worship, 15, 24, 87, etc. (4) Hymns relating to trial and calamity, 9, 22, 55, 56, 109, etc. (5) Messianic Psalms, 2,16, 40, 72, 110, etc. (6) Hymns of general religious character, 89, 90, 91, 121, 127, etc.

The following classification has been given in the hope of suggesting the most prominent religious characteristics of the Psalms. (1) Those that recognize the one infinite, all-wise and omnipotent God. (2) Those that recognize the universality of his love and providence and goodness. (3) Those showing abhorrence of all idols and the rejection of all subordinate deities. (4) Those giving prophetic glimpses of the Divine Son and of his redeeming work on earth. (5) Those showing the terrible nature of sin, the divine hatred of it and judgment of God upon sinners. (6) Those teaching the doctrines of forgiveness, divine mercy, and the duty of repentance. (7) Those emphasizing the beauty of holiness, the importance of faith and the soul's privilege of communion with God.

Analysis.

  1. Davidic Psalms. 1-41. These are not only ascribed to him but reflect much of his life and faith.

  2. Historical Psalms. 42-72. These are ascribed to several authors, those of the sons of Korah being prominent and are especially full of historical facts.

  3. Liturgical or Ritualistic Psalms. 73-89. Most of them are ascribed to Asaph and, besides being specially prescribed for worship, they are strongly historical.

  4. Other Pre-Captivity Psalms. 90-106. Ten are anonymous, one is Moses' (Ps. 90) and the rest David's. They reflect much of the pre-captivity sentiment and history.

  5. Psalms of the Captivity and Return. 107-150. Matters pertaining to the captivity and return to Jerusalem.

For Study and Discussion. (1) On what occasion were the following Palms probably composed: (a) Psalm 3 (2 Sam. 15). (b) Psalm 24 (2 Sam. 6:12-17). (c) Psalm 56 (1 Sam. 21:10-15). (d) Psalms 75 and 76 (2 Kings 19:32-37). (e) Psalm 109 (1 Sam. 22:9-23). (f) Psalm 74 (2 Kings 25:2-18). (g) Psalm 60 (1 Chron. 18:11-13). (2) What is the subject of Psalms 23, 84, 103,133 and 137? (3) What doctrine of the divine character is taught in each of the following Psalms; 8, 19, 33, 46, 93, 115 and 139?


Lectionary Calendar
Saturday, June 24th, 2017
the Week of Proper 6 / Ordinary 11
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