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Bible Commentaries

Gary H. Everett's Study Notes on the Holy Scriptures
1 Corinthians 11

 

 

Other Authors
Verses 2-16

The Order of Divine Authority - In 1 Corinthians 11:2-16 Paul attempts to set in order the roles of men and women in the church. He first explains the order of divine authority that God has placed within the body of Christ ( 1 Corinthians 11:2-3). Paul then explained this order by using an example from their culture ( 1 Corinthians 11:4-6). He then uses examples of creation to further this argument ( 1 Corinthians 11:7-16).

In this passage Paul seems make more comments in this passage on public assembly about the woman than the man. We can imagine a city with a thousand temple prostitutes where Paul saw the need to make a clear distinction between heathen prostitutes and God-fearing women in church. We can also see these small congregations meeting in house churches. This would cause the believers to ask if the women should dress as they would in their private houses, or should they dress as in public. In the Jewish culture women did not join the men in public worship; rather, it was conducted by men and boys. In Herod's Temple the women had a separate court apart from the men. But in Greek culture, the women had greater freedom. In Corinth, the women were a part of temple worship. Thus, Paul deals with this issue immediately after his discussion on heathen worship that involved fornication and foods offered to idols.

1 Corinthians 11:2 Now I praise you, brethren, that ye remember me in all things, and keep the ordinances, as I delivered them to you.

1 Corinthians 11:2 — "Now I praise you, brethren, that ye remember me in all things" - Comments- Paul first gives praise before he gives correction. This is a wise procedure for managing anyone, in church or in business. Often, I have sat down with an employee and told him the good things that he is doing. Then, I go into some areas that need correcting.

Paul is praising them because they were keeping the ordinances regarding public worship. He will begin his next topic on the abuse of the Lord's Supper in 1 Corinthians 11:7 by saying, "I praise you not."

1 Corinthians 11:2 — "and keep the ordinances" - Word Study on "keep" - Strong says the Greek word "keep" ( κατέχω) (G 2722) means, "to hold down (fast)." The Enhanced Strong says this word is used 19 times in the New Testament.

Word Study on "ordinances" - Strong says the Greek word "ordinances" ( παράδοσις) (G 3862) literally means, "transmission, a precept, the Jewish traditionary law." The Enhanced Strong says this word is used 13times in the New Testament, being translated in the KJV as, "tradition 12, ordinance 1."

Comments- Ordinances refer to the teachings that Paul handed down to the believers a Corinth. These teachings included the ordinances that the apostles and elders agreed upon at the Council of Jerusalem found in Acts 15:22-31.

Paul used this same Greek word in his second epistle to the church at Thessalonica:

2 Thessalonians 2:15, "Therefore, brethren, stand fast, and hold the traditions which ye have been taught, whether by word, or our epistle."

2 Thessalonians 3:6, "Now we command you, brethren, in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ, that ye withdraw yourselves from every brother that walketh disorderly, and not after the tradition which he received of us."

Paul gave these same ordinances to each church that he established. Therefore, Paul is not using this word in its narrow sense that we do today to refer to only the two "ordinances" of water baptism and the Lord's Supper. It has a broader application to refer to an ethical code of conduct, which Paul will discuss in chapters 11-14.

1 Corinthians 11:2 — "as I delivered them to you" - Word Study on "delivered" - Strong says the Greek word "delivered" ( παραδίδωμι) (G 3860) means, "to surrender, yield up, intrust, transmit." The Enhanced Strong says this word is used 121times in the New Testament, being translated in the KJV as, "deliver 53, betray 40, deliver up 10, give 4, give up 4, give over 2, commit 2, misc 6."

Comments- These ordinances that Paul delivered unto the Corinthians on an earlier occasion deal with the order of public worship. In fact, Paul will conclude this lengthy discuss in 1 Corinthians 14:40 by saying, "Let all things be done decently and in order." These "ordinances" are codes of conduct to be used as guidelines in public worship.

1 Corinthians 11:3 But I would have you know, that the head of every man is Christ; and the head of the woman is the man; and the head of Christ is God.

1 Corinthians 11:3Comments- Jesus came in the name and authority of His Heavenly Father ( John 5:43). We come in the name of Jesus, with His authority. A man's wife comes in her husband's name.

Illustration- When a wife comes of the bank to sign a check, she signs it in the husband's name, because that name has been given to her to use his authority any time she needs it.

John 5:43, "I am come in my Father"s name, and ye receive me not: if another shall come in his own name, him ye will receive."

1 Corinthians 11:4 Every man praying or prophesying, having his head covered, dishonoureth his head.

1 Corinthians 11:4Comments- For the Prayer of Manasseh , his head, or authority, is Christ.

1 Corinthians 11:5 But every woman that prayeth or prophesieth with her head uncovered dishonoureth her head: for that is even all one as if she were shaven.

1 Corinthians 11:5"But every woman that prayeth or prophesieth with her head uncovered dishonoureth her head" - Comments- That Isaiah , the man is in authority, or the head, over the woman (see 1 Corinthians 11:3).

1 Corinthians 11:5 — "for that is even all one as if she were shaven" - Here Paul is comparing natural laws in order to illustrate spiritual laws. For a woman to be uncovered in spiritual worship is like being shaven in the natural. For it is a shame for a woman to be bald in public life.

1 Corinthians 11:5Comments- The veil for covering the women would have been of Oriental usage, something unfamiliar with the Greek women of Corinth. It was a sign of modest and submission. In contrast, we can imagine the independent woman of the Greek culture adapting herself to the modest customs of public assembly in the Corinthian church. Thus, Paul is establishing some guidelines in this area of dress and conduct for women.

1 Corinthians 11:6 For if the woman be not covered, let her also be shorn: but if it be a shame for a woman to be shorn or shaven, let her be covered.

1 Corinthians 11:5-6Comments- In African culture, young girls have to keep their hair cut short during their school years. This is because most children attend boarding school away from home, and since young girls do not know how to manage and keep long hair, they have to keep it short for hygiene and appearance. As they graduate and later marry, they will grow their hair longer, often at the request of their husbands, in order to enhance their beauty. In such a society, long hair symbolizes a lady who is subject to a husband, while short hair symbolizes a young, unmarried lady. Thus, the married woman's hair serves as a covering to honor her husband.

From these two verses, we conclude that a woman's hairstyle in the first century subjected her to certain images in her society. For example, an adult lady with a shaven head may have meant that she was single, independent or possibly one of the many temple prostitutes that lived in the city of Corinth.

Of course, with the influence of western cultures into African societies through the media, the issue of hairstyle begins to lose its significance. In the same way, it is apparent that Paul was addressing a Greek society with mixed views on the length of a woman's hair, and this due to the influence of outside cultures. Thus, Paul gives the Corinthians some options in how to manage their hairstyle in a godly fashion without compromising their Christian values.

Paul seems to be saying that in a similar way it is a shame for a woman to be bald in public life, it is a shame for a woman to be uncovered in worship.

1 Corinthians 11:7"but the woman is the glory of the man" - Comments- The woman was created for man"s glory.

1 Corinthians 11:8Comments- This is not like the question of which came first: the chicken or the egg; because man definitely came first.

1 Corinthians 11:10 — "For this cause ought the woman to have power on her head" - Comments- A woman's hair serves as a covering to show submission to her husband, which is her sign of having a man in authority over her.

1 Corinthians 11:10 — "because of the angels" - Comments- Some scholars have suggested that this covering of the head of women kept the angels from admiring their beauty. Clement of Alexandria commented that the word "angels" is being used figuratively in this verse and actually refers to the righteous men in the church. 137]

137] Clement of Alexandria writes, "‘Because of the angels.' By the angels he means righteous and virtuous men. Let her be veiled then, that she may not lead them to stumble into fornication. For the real angels in heaven see her though veiled." (Fragments of Clemens Alexandrinus: IV- From the Books of the Hypotyposes: Oecumenius from Book III. On 1Corinthians ) (ANF 2)

However, we do see in Genesis 6:2 that angels did in fact admire women, came down and married them, and bore children by them.

Genesis 6:2, "That the sons of God saw the daughters of men that they were fair; and they took them wives of all which they chose."

E. W. Bullinger notes that these giants existed after the Flood because there are references to giants after the time of Noah. He asks how this could be if they were all destroyed by the Flood? It was just this perverted event that brought upon man the destruction of the earth. He finds the answer in Genesis 6:4 in the phrase "and also after that". The Scriptures are telling us that these giants walked the earth during the time of Noah and "afterwards", or after the Flood. 138] Evidently, these angelic "sons of God" came back down to earth sometime after the Flood and again came in unto the daughters of men. We know that this took place before the time of Abraham since the Rephaim, or giants, are found among the peoples who were defeated by the king of Elam ( Genesis 14). The context of the Old Testament suggests that this time it was not in such a great measure of wickedness.

138] E. W. Bullinger, Appendix 23: "The Sons of God" in Genesis 6:2 ,4, in The Companion Bible Being The Authorized Version of 1611With The Structures And Notes, Critical, Explanatory and Suggestive And With 198 Appendixes (London: Oxford University Press, c 1909-22), 26-7.

We see them spoken of again in Numbers 13:33 as the children of Anak when the children of Israel spied out the land of the Canaanites.

Numbers 13:33, "And there we saw the giants, the sons of Anak, which come of the giants: and we were in our own sight as grasshoppers, and so we were in their sight."

Deuteronomy 9:2, "A people great and tall, the children of the Anakims, whom thou knowest, and of whom thou hast heard say, Who can stand before the children of Anak!"

The Scriptures give us the names of three of the children of Anak who were defeated by Caleb.

Numbers 13:22, "And they ascended by the south, and came unto Hebron; where Ahiman, Sheshai, and Talmai, the children of Anak, were. (Now Hebron was built seven years before Zoan in Egypt.)"

Joshua 15:14, "And Caleb drove thence the three sons of Anak, Sheshai, and Ahiman, and Talmai, the children of Anak."

We find a reference to other descendents of these giants, called the Emims and the Zamzummims, in Deuteronomy. Moses records for us that the sons of Esau, the Ammonites, destroyed them before possessing their land.

Deuteronomy 2:10-11, "The Emims dwelt therein in times past, a people great, and many, and tall, as the Anakims; Which also were accounted giants, as the Anakims; but the Moabites call them Emims."

Deuteronomy 2:20-21, "(That also was accounted a land of giants: giants dwelt therein in old time; and the Ammonites call them Zamzummims; A people great, and many, and tall, as the Anakims; but the LORD destroyed them before them; and they succeeded them, and dwelt in their stead:"

In addition, we find eighteen references to the Rephaim, or giants, in the Old Testament, of whom were born Goliath the Gittite and his brothers. These giants are called "mighty men which were of old, men of renown" in Genesis 6:4. This is the way the Philistines viewed Goliath and his brothers in battle. Finally, we find such creatures in Greek and Roman mythology.

God sent the sword of the Israelites into the land of Canaan this time as His form of divine judgment, but it took several hundred years before a man like David and his fighting men were able to wipe out this race of creatures.

Within the context of this discussion, we may have found insight into Paul's comment to the Corinthian church when he said, "For this cause ought the woman to have power on her head because of the angels." ( 1 Corinthians 11:10) In other words, we must ask the question if it is possible for such angels to be attracted to the daughters of men today.

1 Corinthians 11:8-10Comments- The Woman is Under Man's Authority - Paul takes a few verses in 1 Corinthians 11:8-10 to explain that a woman is to be in submission under the authority of her husband; for this is the reason for her having long hair.

1 Corinthians 11:11 Nevertheless neither is the man without the woman, neither the woman without the Prayer of Manasseh , in the Lord.

1 Corinthians 11:12 For as the woman is of the Prayer of Manasseh , even so is the man also by the woman; but all things of God.

1 Corinthians 11:11-12Comments - The Proper Relationship of Man and Woman- Paul has just stated that the woman is to be in submission to the man ( 1 Corinthians 11:8-10). Man is prone to take a statement and take it to an extreme. We find women treated like property in the Oriental cultures like Islam. Thus, Paul wants to keep the Church balanced on this issue of the relationship between a man and his wife. Within the bonds of holy matrimony they were created to serve one another.

1 Corinthians 11:13 Judge in yourselves: is it comely that a woman pray unto God uncovered?

1 Corinthians 11:14 Doth not even nature itself teach you, that, if a man have long hair, it is a shame unto him?

1 Corinthians 11:14Comments - A man cuts his hair short as a sign of submission to God, in as much as he is the image and glory of God. Paul has just said, "Every man praying or prophesying, having his head covered, dishonoureth his head." ( 1 Corinthians 11:4) Thus, a man is to keep his head uncovered in order to reflect the image of God, in which he was fashioned.

1 Corinthians 11:15 But if a woman have long hair, it is a glory to her: for her hair is given her for a covering.

1 Corinthians 11:15Comments - In contrast to a man uncovering his head by cutting his hair, a woman has long hair as an expression of submission to her husband; for Paul has just stated, "But every woman that prayeth or prophesieth with her head uncovered dishonoureth her head." ( 1 Corinthians 11:5)

1 Corinthians 11:16 But if any man seem to be contentious, we have no such custom, neither the churches of God.

1 Corinthians 11:16Comments - When a man insists on wearing long hair, it is often for contentious reasons. A man with long hair in the body of Christ stands out differently.


Verses 2-40

Public Worship - Paul now turns his attention to issues regarding public worship in 1 Corinthians 11:2 to 1 Corinthians 14:40. These directives on public worship in the Church will stand in direct contrast to the heathen forms of public worship in their pagan temples, which has been dealt with in the previous passages of this Epistle. Remember in the Old Testament how the priests and Levites had to sanctify themselves before entering into the service of the Tabernacle and Temple. Therefore, Paul uses this same approach for the New Testament Church. He first discusses the order of divine authority within the church, with most of his emphasis upon the role of women ( 1 Corinthians 11:2-16). Paul then deals with the ordinance of the Lord's Supper by correcting some abuses in order to bring unity among the believers at Corinth ( 1 Corinthians 11:17-34). With these two areas of public worship set in order, the gifts of the Spirit are able to operate among the believers. Therefore, Paul takes a great deal of time to discuss the operation of the gifts of the Spirit during public worship ( 1 Corinthians 12:1 to 1 Corinthians 14:40).

Outline- Note the proposed outline:

1. The Order of Divine Authority — 1 Corinthians 11:2-16

2. The Ordinance of the Lord's Supper — 1 Corinthians 11:17-34

3. Spiritual Gifts — 1 Corinthians 12:1 to 1 Corinthians 14:40


Verses 17-22

The Abuse of the Lord's Supper- In this section Paul will explain how they are abusing this ordinance ( 1 Corinthians 11:17-22). He will then explain the meaning and purpose of the Lord's Supper ( 1 Corinthians 11:23-26), and finally tell them the consequences of abusing it ( 1 Corinthians 11:27-34).

Paul accuses the Corinthians of being divided during this supper, rather than united, turning the Lord's Supper into a regular festival, rather than a testimony in honor of Jesus' death, resurrection and Second Coming. We can imagine a slave eating next to his master, something which did not happen in the domestic home or workplace. Yet, in the congregation, these divisions were to be laid aside, and unity was to bring a strong bond of peace and love among the church members. Instead, this event was causing divisions rather than unity.

1 Corinthians 11:17 Now in this that I declare unto you I praise you not, that ye come together not for the better, but for the worse.

1 Corinthians 11:17 — "Now in this that I declare unto you I praise you not" - Word Study on "this" - Scholars have been divided as to the identification of the antecedent of the near demonstrative pronoun τοῦτο (this). Some suggest that it refers to the previous topic of women's conduct and dress in public worship ( 1 Corinthians 11:2-16). Others suggest it refers to the new topic that follows, which is about abuses of the Lord's Supper ( 1 Corinthians 11:17-34). However, we find Paul beginning his previous topic of women in public worship with a similar phrase, "Now I praise you" ( 1 Corinthians 11:2). This is a clear indication that Paul is starting a new topic with the phrase "I praise you not" ( 1 Corinthians 11:17). Since the later part of 1 Corinthians 11:17 refers to the Lord's Supper, it is not proper to divide the first part of this Greek sentence and attach it to the preceding topic. In addition, the previous verse ( 1 Corinthians 11:16) serves as a closing statement to the topic of women. Therefore, I believe it refers to the topic of the Lord's Supper.

Word Study on "declare" - Strong says the Greek word "declare" ( παραγγέλλω) (G 3853) means, "to transmit a message," and it means by implication, "to enjoin, to charge, to command, to declare." The Enhanced Strong says this Greek word is used 31times in the New Testament, being translated in the KJV as, "command 20, charge 6, give commandment 1, give charge 1, declare 1, give in charge 1, command 1." John Calvin translates it as "warn." 139] John Gill tells us that the ancient Syriac version reads, "this is what I command." 140]

139] John Calvin, Commentaries on the Epistles of Paul the Apostle to the Corinthians, vol 1, trans. John Pringle (Edinburgh: The Calvin Translation Society, 1848), 364.

140] John Gill, 1 Corinthians , in John Gill's Expositor, in e-Sword, v 777 [CD-ROM] (Franklin, Tennessee: e-Sword, 2000-2005), comments on 1Corinthians .

Comments- Paul first gives praise before he gives correction. This is a wise procedure for managing anyone, in church or in business. Often, I have sat down with an employee and told him the good things that he is doing. Then, I go into some areas that need correcting.

Paul had opened his Epistle to them with a word of praise to God "in every thing they were enriched by him, in all utterance, and in all knowledge" ( 1 Corinthians 1:5). He then praises them on keeping his ordinances regarding public worship in the preceding passage of Scripture ( 1 Corinthians 11:2-16). Now, he will begin his next topic on the abuse of the Lord's Supper in 1 Corinthians 11:7 by saying, "I praise you not," because they needed correction.

1 Corinthians 11:17 — "that ye come together not for the better, but for the worse" - Comments- Paul accuses them of coming together, not for their benefit, but for their detriment. In other words, the benefit of coming together for this meal was to instill unity among the members. But, what actually took place was an occasion to sow discourse and division among them. Thus, this meal was doing harm rather than good. The unworthy manner in which the Corinthians participated in the Lord"s Supper brought judgment upon them and not blessings. Paul will explain this in verse 30.

1 Corinthians 11:30, "For this cause many are weak and sickly among you, and many sleep."

Therefore, they were worse off for participating in this meal than if they had not participated at all. Paul tells them that they were literally eating and drinking damnation upon themselves. Note:

1 Corinthians 11:29, "For he that eateth and drinketh unworthily, eateth and drinketh damnation to himself, not discerning the Lord"s body."

1 Corinthians 11:17Comments- Paul praised the Corinthians in 1 Corinthians 11:2 because they had been following his ordinances regarding dress and submission during public worship well, but he needed to give them some specific instructions, which he laid down in the previous passage ( 1 Corinthians 11:2-16). Now, Paul deals with deliberate violations of Paul"s instructions regarding the Lord"s Supper. The previous passage deals with violations out of ignorance, where they had an excuse for any inappropriate behavior. Now, Paul deals with violations that proceed from an insensitive heart. Thus, he has no praise to give them before he lays down correction. He feels that they have no excuse for their behaviour is division that dishonored some members of the congregation.

1 Corinthians 11:18 For first of all, when ye come together in the church, I hear that there be divisions among you; and I partly believe it.

1 Corinthians 11:18 — "For first of all" - Comments- The idea of something coming first implies that there is a second matter coming afterwards. Perhaps the first matter is about the abuses of the Lord's Supper ( 1 Corinthians 11:17-34), and the second matter is the abuse of the gifts of the Spirit in public worship (12-14). We may also include Paul's discussion of the Resurrection as a corrective measure against heresies within the church (15). This would mean that Paul is saving the corrective discussions for last, after giving them as much praise as they were worthy in previous topics.

1 Corinthians 11:18 — "when ye come together in the church" - Comments- When Paul later wrote to the church in Rome from Corinth, they were meeting in the house of Gaius ( Romans 16:23). We can find other Scriptures that testify how these early congregations met in the homes of certain members. JFB notes that since the churches during the time of the apostles had no designated building to call their church, as we do today, it meant that the ordinance of the Lord's Supper was even more important as a way of bonding these believers together in one accord. This practice of eating together was one outward testimony that they were members of the body of Christ, since they had not church building to provide such a testimony of their unity. 141]

141] Robert Jamieson, A. R. Fausset, and David Brown, First Corinthians, in Jamieson, Fausset, and Brown Commentary, Electronic Database (Seattle, WA: Hendrickson Publishers Inc, 1997), in P.C. Study Bible, v 31 [CD-ROM] (Seattle, WA: Biblesoft Inc, 1993-2000), comments on 1Corinthians .

Romans 16:23, "Gaius mine host, and of the whole church, saluteth you. Erastus the chamberlain of the city saluteth you, and Quartus a brother."

1 Corinthians 11:18 — "I hear" - Comments- While in Ephesus, perhaps towards the middle or end of his three-year ministry there, a report came from the household of Chloe regarding divisions within the church ( 1 Corinthians 1:11). Another common report mentioned a case of incest ( 1 Corinthians 5:1) as well as abuses of the Lord's supper ( 1 Corinthians 11:18). With the coming of Stephanas, Fortunatus and Achaicus from the church at Corinth to meet Paul at Ephesus ( 1 Corinthians 16:17), a number of additional issues were presented to him. These two communications were the source of this report of division.

1 Corinthians 1:11, "For it hath been declared unto me of you, my brethren, by them which are of the house of Chloe, that there are contentions among you."

1 Corinthians 16:17, "I am glad of the coming of Stephanas and Fortunatus and Achaicus: for that which was lacking on your part they have supplied."

1 Corinthians 11:18 — "that there be divisions among you" - Word Study on "divisions" - Strong says the Greek word "schisma" ( σχί σμα) (G 4978) literally means, "a split, gap." BDAG says it literally means, "tear, crack," and figuratively, "division, dissension, schism." The Enhanced Strong says this Greek word is used 8 times in the New Testament, being translated in the KJV as, "division 5, rent 2, schism 1."

Comments - In this ancient world where everyone was labeled a slave or a free Prayer of Manasseh , a Jew or a Gentile, a Greek or a barbarian, a Roman citizen or one under tribute, divisions were hard to overcome. But in the Church, we all become one. Paul is about to tell them this in the next chapter. Note:

1 Corinthians 12:13, "For by one Spirit are we all baptized into one body, whether we be Jews or Gentiles, whether we be bond or free; and have been all made to drink into one Spirit."

1 Corinthians 11:18"and I partly believe it" - Comments - Paul had the wisdom to learn not to believe everything that he heard, in the same way parents learn not to take everything their children tell them seriously. Yet, he understood how easily strife enters into a congregation, so he knew there was a problem that he must address. He may have first heard it by Chloe ( 1 Corinthians 1:11) and had it confirmed by the coming of Stephanas, Fortunatus and Achaicus ( 1 Corinthians 16:17). Chances are he had heard it from only one source. Otherwise, Paul would not have been so hesitant as to say that he believes it partially. If he had heard it from several sources, he would have fully believed the report.

1 Corinthians 11:19 For there must be also heresies among you, that they which are approved may be made manifest among you.

1 Corinthians 11:19 — "For there must be also heresies among you" - Word Study on "heresies" - Strong tells that the Greek word "hairesis" ( αἵρεσις) (G 139) literally means, "a choice, a party, a disunion." The Enhanced Strong says this Greek word is used 9 times in the New Testament, being translated in the KJV as, "sect 5, heresy 4."

Comments - Albert Barnes explains this statement to mean that such is human nature and the corrupt passions of men, not that they are necessary, but rather unavoidable. 142]

142] Albert Barnes, The First Epistle to the Corinthians, in Barnes" Notes, Electronic Database (Seattle, WA: Hendrickson Publishers Inc, 1997), in P.C. Study Bible, v 31 [CD-ROM] (Seattle, WA: Biblesoft Inc, 1993-2000), comments on 1Corinthians .

There are two different Greek words used in 1 Corinthians 11:18-18, one translated "divisions" and the other "heresies." Many scholars suggest that word "divisions" simply describes disagreements over issues and doctrines, while "heresies" describes a more developed and organized form of division in which the congregation has divided itself into identifiable groups. John Calvin gives his view as to why Paul words these verses so:

"I take schism and heresy here in the way of less and greater. Schisms, then, are either secret grudges- when we do not see that agreement which ought to subsist among the pious- when inclinations at variance with each other are at work- when every one is mightily pleased with his own way, and finds fault with everything that is done by others. Heresies are when the evil proceeds to such a pitch that open hostility is discovered, and persons deliberately divide themselves into opposite parties." 143]

143] John Calvin, Commentaries on the Epistles of Paul the Apostle to the Corinthians, vol 1, trans. John Pringle (Edinburgh: The Calvin Translation Society, 1848), 366-367.

1 Corinthians 11:19Comments - Any time a group gathers in Jesus' name, the unbelievers will be manifest as being different. These types of divisions will happen for the reason give in this verse, so that the genuine believers will be made manifest. Thus, God has a way of bringing out a good end to something that is inherently bad.

The second epistle of Peter and the epistle of Jude refer to these unapproved people feasting with the truly sincere believers:

2 Peter 2:13, "And shall receive the reward of unrighteousness, as they that count it pleasure to riot in the day time. Spots they are and blemishes, sporting themselves with their own deceivings while they feast with you;"

Jude 1:12, "These are spots in your feasts of charity, when they feast with you, feeding themselves without fear: clouds they are without water, carried about of winds; trees whose fruit withereth, without fruit, twice dead, plucked up by the roots;"

1 Corinthians 11:20 When ye come together therefore into one place, this is not to eat the Lord"s supper.

1 Corinthians 11:20"this is not to eat the Lord's supper" - Comments - This phrase "the Lord's supper" is unique to the New Testament. It testifies to the fact that this event had become a regular practice and ordinance in the earliest years of the Church since it has a designated title. However, we see phrases "while they feast with you" ( 2 Peter 2:13) and "feasts of charity" ( Jude 1:12) used in the General Epistles, possibly refer to this same event.

Paul is saying that this is not the Lord's Supper which the Lord Jesus Christ had ordained, because it was causing divisions rather than unity. This meal was to be different than the pagan rituals of eating foods in honor of and offered unto idols. It was supposed to testify of Jesus' Crucifixion, Resurrection and Second Coming rather than to feed fleshly appetites. But as Barnes states, the Corinthians had converted this event into an ordinary festival.

1 Corinthians 11:21 For in eating every one taketh before other his own supper: and one is hungry, and another is drunken.

1 Corinthians 11:21 — "and another is drunken" - Comments - We have evidence in 1 Corinthians 11:21 that the early Church drank wine as a part of the Lord's Supper. Such modest drinking was a part of the culture, and not condemned by the early Church. We see another testimony of this in 1 Timothy 5:23. It must be noted that Paul required Church leaders to abstain from a lifestyle of drinking. He apparently gave Timothy permission to break this rule for health reasons.

1 Timothy 5:23, "Drink no longer water, but use a little wine for thy stomach"s sake and thine often infirmities."

1 Corinthians 11:21Comments - 1 Corinthians 11:21 shows us that there were various classes of people making up the Corinthian church. There were rich and poor, masters and slaves.

1 Corinthians 11:22 What? have ye not houses to eat and to drink in? or despise ye the church of God, and shame them that have not? What shall I say to you? shall I praise you in this? I praise you not.

1 Corinthians 11:22 — "What? have ye not houses to eat and to drink in" - Illustration- We hired a house girl as missionaries to East Africa. When we eat at home, she usually eats separately as a part of her culture and position, although we have invited her to eat with us. But, when we take her with us to public events, she eats with us.


Verses 17-34

The Ordinance of the Lord's Supper - In 1 Corinthians 11:17-34 Paul deals with the issue of abuses of the Lord's Supper. Such abuse was probably the result of divisions within the church. It became the custom at Corinth for members to bring their own food and drink and join some congenial group to share it with, leaving the poorer members without. Again, Paul deals with this issue immediately after his discussion on heathen forms of worship that involve fornication and foods offered to idols. In this section Paul will explain how they are abusing this ordinance ( 1 Corinthians 11:17-22), then explain the meaning and purpose of the Lord's Supper ( 1 Corinthians 11:23-26), and finally tell them the consequences of abusing it ( 1 Corinthians 11:27-34).

Outline - Here is a proposed outline:

1. The Abuse of the Lord's Supper — 1 Corinthians 11:17-22

2. The Meaning of the Lord's Supper — 1 Corinthians 11:23-26

3. The Consequences of Abusing the Lord's Supper — 1 Corinthians 11:27-34

Paul's Rebuke Over the Practice of the Lord's Supper- The book of Acts gives us an indication that the Lord Supper was practiced frequently in the early Church.

Acts 2:42-46, "And they continued stedfastly in the apostles" doctrine and fellowship, and in breaking of bread, and in prayers. And fear came upon every soul: and many wonders and signs were done by the apostles. And all that believed were together, and had all things common; And sold their possessions and goods, and parted them to all men, as every man had need. And they, continuing daily with one accord in the temple, and breaking bread from house to house, did eat their meat with gladness and singleness of heart,"

Acts 20:7, "And upon the first day of the week, when the disciples came together to break bread, Paul preached unto them, ready to depart on the morrow; and continued his speech until midnight."

As they gathered weekly to break bread, the Lord"s Supper took up a portion of the mealtime. These meals were known as "love feasts."

2 Peter 2:13, "And shall receive the reward of unrighteousness, as they that count it pleasure to riot in the day time. Spots they are and blemishes, sporting themselves with their own deceivings while they feast with you;"

Jude 1:12, "These are spots in your feasts of charity, when they feast with you, feeding themselves without fear: clouds they are without water, carried about of winds; trees whose fruit withereth, without fruit, twice dead, plucked up by the roots;"

While cultural and ethnic divisions are a normal occurrence in any society, they do not belong within the local church body. In Uganda, East Africa, there is a small group of about one hundred Filipinos, with this cultural group being divided into the rich and the poor. But when they come together for cultural events, there is no division. In contrast, there is a much larger population of Indians in this nation, again falling into two groups, the rich and the poor. In this case, the rich do not invite the poor when having cultural events, but segregate themselves from the poor.

In societies, such segregation is normal. In this passage ( 1 Corinthians 11:17-34), Paul condemns such behavior as unworthy of a Christian. He then emphasizes the need for unity in the local church. The only segregation that Paul allows is for genuine believers to separate themselves from false Christians ( 1 Corinthians 11:19). Paul then warns them of God's judgment for those who persist in such disunity.


Verses 23-26

The Purpose of the Lord's Supper- In 1 Corinthians 11:23-26 Paul will explain the purpose of the Lord's Supper. He has just told them how they are abusing this ordinance ( 1 Corinthians 11:17-22), and he will finally tell them the consequences of abusing it ( 1 Corinthians 11:27-34). In 1 Corinthians 11:23-26 Paul explains the meaning of the Lord's Supper because this sacred ordinance was being abused by the Corinthian church. It was an act of renewing a believer's covenant with God, which one initially makes at the time of being born again by confession Jesus Christ as Saviour and Lord of his life.

Jesus the Passover Lamb- The Lord' supper is similar to the Old Testament Passover meal. The Jews understood that the Passover Meal was to consist of the Passover lamb and unleavened bread. They understood that the lamb and its shed blood served as an atonement for the sins of the people. Therefore, when Jesus presented the cup and the bread as His blood and body, they could not help but relate this symbolism to the Passover lamb. Under the new covenant, Jesus is our Passover Lamb. The bread ( 1 Corinthians 11:24) represents Jesus" broken body. According to 1 Peter 2:24 the bread represents Jesus" scourging, which paid for our healing, as well representing as His death on Calvary. The cup ( 1 Corinthians 11:25) represents Jesus' blood, which was shed for our sins.

1 Peter 2:24, "Who his own self bare our sins in his own body on the tree, that we, being dead to sins, should live unto righteousness: by whose stripes ye were healed."

1. Reasons: To Renew Our Covenant with God ("this do in remembrance of me") - We partake of the Lord's Supper as a remembrance or as an acknowledgement that it is not by our works of righteousness that gives us forgiveness of sins and healing to our bodies, but by our faith in the redemptive work of Jesus Christ. Partaking of the Lord's Supper is our way of taking the focus off of us and putting our faith in Him as our Saviour and Healer. This is why healing was a part of the first Passover in Egypt and is so until today. As we renew our covenant with the Lord we position ourselves to partake of His covenant blessings.

Israel first made her covenant with God at Mount Sinai. We see Israel renewing her covenant under the reigns of King Song of Solomon , Hezekiah and Josiah. After the Babylonian Captivity Ezra again renewed Israel's covenant with God using the Passover.

2. Reasons: To Build Peace and Unity Among the Brethren - When we eat together there is a bond that is built between one another. We see a clear example of this when Jacob and Laban made a covenant between one another in order to end their strife.

Genesis 31:54, "Then Jacob offered sacrifice upon the mount, and called his brethren to eat bread: and they did eat bread, and tarried all night in the mount."

1 Corinthians 11:23 For I have received of the Lord that which also I delivered unto you, That the Lord Jesus the same night in which he was betrayed took bread:

1 Corinthians 11:23"For I have received of the Lord" - Comments- Evidently, Paul received a divine visitation from the Lord, in which the Lord's Supper was discussed and explained to him. In other words, Paul was taught about the Lord"s Supper by a revelation from Jesus. We read in other Scriptures how Paul received revelation from the Lord.

Galatians 1:1, "Paul, an apostle, (not of men, neither by Prayer of Manasseh , but by Jesus Christ, and God the Father, who raised him from the dead;)"

Galatians 1:12, "For I neither received it of Prayer of Manasseh , neither was I taught it, but by the revelation of Jesus Christ."

For Jesus to reveal this truth and teach it to Paul outside the Apostle's teachings shows its importance in body of Christ.

1 Corinthians 11:23 — "that which also I delivered unto you" - Comments- Paul was exercising his apostolic authority over the Corinthian church by instituting certain ordinances and rules of conduct. He embedded these rules within his Epistles, thus laying down the doctrines of the New Testament Church within his eight Church Epistles, and the rules by which to ordain ministers into Christian service within his four Pastoral Epistles. Paul the apostle was given this unique task under his office as an apostle to the Gentiles.

1 Corinthians 11:23 — "That the Lord Jesus the same night in which he was betrayed took bread" - Comments- Albert Barnes suggests that the phrase "the same night in which he was betrayed" alludes to the betrayal of the Corinthians who had been "betraying the Lord" by partaking of the Lord's Supper in an unworthy manner. 144]

144] Albert Barnes, The First Epistle to the Corinthians, in Barnes" Notes, Electronic Database (Seattle, WA: Hendrickson Publishers Inc, 1997), in P.C. Study Bible, v 31 [CD-ROM] (Seattle, WA: Biblesoft Inc, 1993-2000), comments on 1Corinthians .

1 Corinthians 11:24 And when he had given thanks, he brake it, and said, Take, eat: this is my body, which is broken for you: this do in remembrance of me.

1 Corinthians 11:24"this is my body, which is broken for you" - Word Study on "broken" - This Greek word κλάω is used literally in the breaking of bread. Thayer says it is used here metaphorically in the "violent death," or the shattering, of Jesus' body.

Comments - Jesus' body was broken "in our behalf," or "in our place." Christ became our substitution ( Galatians 3:13-14, Hebrews 2:9).

Galatians 3:13-14, "Christ hath redeemed us from the curse of the law, being made a curse for us: for it is written, Cursed is every one that hangeth on a tree: That the blessing of Abraham might come on the Gentiles through Jesus Christ; that we might receive the promise of the Spirit through faith."

Hebrews 2:9, "But we see Jesus, who was made a little lower than the angels for the suffering of death, crowned with glory and honour; that he by the grace of God should taste death for every man."

1 Corinthians 11:24 — "this do in remembrance of me" - Comments - We partake of the Lord's Supper as a remembrance, or as an acknowledgement, that it is not by our works of righteousness that gives us forgiveness of sins and healing to our bodies, but by our faith in the redemptive work of Jesus Christ. Partaking of the Lord's Supper is our way of taking the focus off of us and putting our faith in Him as our Saviour and Healer. This is why healing was a part of the first Passover in Egypt and is so until today. As we renew our covenant with the Lord we position ourselves to partake of His covenant blessings.

1 Corinthians 11:25 After the same manner also he took the cup, when he had supped, saying, This cup is the new testament in my blood: this do ye, as oft as ye drink it, in remembrance of me.

1 Corinthians 11:25Comments- The Old Covenant is seen in Exodus 24:3-8. The New Covenant is prophesied in Jeremiah 31:31-34; Jeremiah 32:40.

Both old and new covenants are sealed by blood ( Leviticus 17:11, John 19:34, Hebrews 9:16-22).

Leviticus 17:11, "For the life of the flesh is in the blood: and I have given it to you upon the altar to make an atonement for your souls: for it is the blood that maketh an atonement for the soul."

John 19:34, "But one of the soldiers with a spear pierced his side, and forthwith came there out blood and water."

Hebrews 9:16-22.

1 Corinthians 11:26 For as often as ye eat this bread, and drink this cup, ye do shew the Lord"s death till he come.

1 Corinthians 11:26Comments- JFB says that we declare that Jesus died for us by partaking of the Lord's Supper. 145] In other words, we reaffirm our covenant with God through the shed blood of Jesus Christ. In 1 Corinthians 11:26 we are to look back at the Cross, "ye do show the Lord's death," and we are to look forward to His coming, "till He come," which is our eternal hope of redemption. Albert Barnes comments that the phrase "till he come" shows that this sacrament is to be a perpetual activity of the New Testament church until the Second Coming of Jesus Christ. 146]

145] Robert Jamieson, A. R. Fausset, and David Brown, First Corinthians, in Jamieson, Fausset, and Brown Commentary, Electronic Database (Seattle, WA: Hendrickson Publishers Inc, 1997), in P.C. Study Bible, v 31 [CD-ROM] (Seattle, WA: Biblesoft Inc, 1993-2000), comments on 1Corinthians .

146] Albert Barnes, The First Epistle to the Corinthians, in Barnes" Notes, Electronic Database (Seattle, WA: Hendrickson Publishers Inc, 1997), in P.C. Study Bible, v 31 [CD-ROM] (Seattle, WA: Biblesoft Inc, 1993-2000), comments on 1Corinthians .


Verses 27-34

The Consequences of Abusing the Lord's Supper- In this section Paul will explain the consequences of abusing the Lord's Supper. He has just told them how they are abusing this ordinance ( 1 Corinthians 11:17-22), and then explained the original meaning and purpose of this ordinance ( 1 Corinthians 11:23-26). He will now tell the Corinthians the consequences of the abuse of this holy sacrament.

1 Corinthians 11:27 Wherefore whosoever shall eat this bread, and drink this cup of the Lord, unworthily, shall be guilty of the body and blood of the Lord.

1 Corinthians 11:27"Wherefore whosoever shall eat this bread, and drink this cup of the Lord, unworthily" - Comments- The NIV reads, "in an unworthy manner" for "unworthily." This refers the selfish manner in which the Corinthians were partaking of the Lord"s Supper ( 1 Corinthians 11:20-22).

1 Corinthians 11:20-22, "When ye come together therefore into one place, this is not to eat the Lord"s supper. For in eating every one taketh before other his own supper: and one is hungry, and another is drunken. What? have ye not houses to eat and to drink in? or despise ye the church of God, and shame them that have not? What shall I say to you? shall I praise you in this? I praise you not."

1 Corinthians 11:27 — "shall be guilty of the body and blood of the Lord" - Comments- The words, "charged with" seemed to come out of my mouth in the place of "guilty" while meditating on this passage. We are charged with the crime of scourging and crucifying Jesus, as if we had performed the evil deed ourselves.

Most commentators interpret this to mean that they become guilty of treating the body and blood of the Lord with profane disrespect. Note a similar passage in Hebrews 10:26-29 that refer to a believer turning back and counting the blood of the covenant as an unholy thing.

Hebrews 10:26-29, "For if we sin wilfully after that we have received the knowledge of the truth, there remaineth no more sacrifice for sins, But a certain fearful looking for of judgment and fiery indignation, which shall devour the adversaries. He that despised Moses" law died without mercy under two or three witnesses: Of how much sorer punishment, suppose ye, shall he be thought worthy, who hath trodden under foot the Son of God, and hath counted the blood of the covenant, wherewith he was sanctified, an unholy thing, and hath done despite unto the Spirit of grace?

1 Corinthians 11:28 But let a man examine himself, and so let him eat of that bread, and drink of that cup.

1 Corinthians 11:28"But let a man examine himself" - Comments- Put yourself to the test and see if you come out approved in the faith.

2 Corinthians 13:5, "Examine yourselves, whether ye be in the faith; prove your own selves. Know ye not your own selves, how that Jesus Christ is in you, except ye be reprobates?"

1 Corinthians 11:29 For he that eateth and drinketh unworthily, eateth and drinketh damnation to himself, not discerning the Lord"s body.

1 Corinthians 11:29 — "For he that eateth and drinketh unworthily" - Scripture References- Note:

Exodus 32:6, "And they rose up early on the morrow, and offered burnt offerings, and brought peace offerings; and the people sat down to eat and to drink, and rose up to play."

1 Corinthians 11:20-22, "When ye come together therefore into one place, this is not to eat the Lord"s supper. For in eating every one taketh before other his own supper: and one is hungry, and another is drunken. What? have ye not houses to eat and to drink in? or despise ye the church of God, and shame them that have not? What shall I say to you? shall I praise you in this? I praise you not."

1 Corinthians 11:29"not discerning the Lord's body" - Comments- Modern English translates read, "not judging the Lord's body correctly" (NIV, KJV), "not judging the body correctly [rightly]" (RSV, NASB). Some commentators note that this means the guilty ones made no distinction between the sobriety of the Lord"s Supper and the pleasures of an ordinary feast.

Kenneth Hagin explains that there are two aspects to the phrase "not discerning the Lord's body." First, Jesus shed His blood for our sins, but His body was broken for our healing. Thus, these Corinthian church members, who were sickly and dying prematurely, were not recognizing and applying the physical healing that Jesus provided through His atonement. Second, the "body of Christ" refers to the Church. The Corinthian believers were behaving themselves in an unworthy manner with each other, particularly when they came together to partake of the Lord's Supper. In other words, they were not walking in love with one another, and God had no choice but to judge them because they were not judging themselves. 147]

147] Kenneth Hagin, Love the Way to Victory (Tulsa, Oklahoma: Faith Library Publications, c 1994, 1995), 228-33.

In 1990 Robert Tilton, pastor of Word of Faith Family Church, Dallas, Texas, organized two prayer warriors to pray in a separate room during the Sunday morning church service. On Sunday, April 22, 1990 Robert Tilton was preaching while two of us were assigned to pray throughout the service. I was taking my turn praying in the prayer room that Sunday. Tilton began to tell how through satellite God's Word is raining down across this nation. I had been praying in tongues about one and a half hours into the service. When he said that, I began to envision souls being saved and the kingdom of God being planted everywhere and I said, "I can see the body of Christ!" Immediately, the Lord quickened to me the phrase used here in 1 Corinthians 11:29, "not discerning the Lord's body." I knew at that time that the term "the Lord's body" was a reference to the church, also called the body of Christ. We must see that God is saving souls from all walks of life, even homosexuals, prostitutes, murderers, etc. In this particular passage ( 1 Corinthians 11:17-34) Paul was telling the church that they were not receiving the poor into their church; but rather, they were causing divisions and divided groups within this group of believers. This was a sin against the other believers. Why so; because they were not "discerning", or "recognizing", the other members of Christ's body in love and acceptance. The rich believers were not properly recognizing that the poor in the church were also a part of the body of Christ. These rich believers then become guilty (verse 27) of the body (i.e, sinning against other believers) and guilty of the blood (not remembering that Jesus' blood cleansed them also) of the Jesus Christ. Illustration:

In October 2000 Benny Hinn received the opportunity to hold an international crusade in Dubai, of the United Arab Emirates. This is a country beside Saudi Arabia and is primarily Muslim. As is the custom of Benny Hinn in his miracle healing crusades, he allows people to come up out of the audience and testify of their healings. Therefore, the Lord spoke to Benny Hinn and said that he is not to ask the person of what religious faith that person is coming from, because "I have accepted him." 148] God accepts anyone who comes to Him in faith through Jesus Christ, regardless of a person"s background.

148] Benny Hinn, This is Your Day (Irving, Texas), on Trinity Broadcasting Network (Santa Ana, California, October 2000), television program.

1 Corinthians 11:30 For this cause many are weak and sickly among you, and many sleep.

1 Corinthians 11:30Word Study on "sickly" - BDAG says the Greek word ἄ ῤ ῥ ωστος literally means, "powerless," and carries the additional meaning, "sick, ill." Leon Morris says this word means, "feeble, sickly," being derived from the Greek prefix and the verb ῥ ώνυμμι, which means, "to strengthen." 149]

149] Leon Morris, The Gospel According to Matthew , in The Pillar New Testament Commentary (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1992), 376.

Comments- 1 Corinthians 11:30 describes the effects in our lives of God's chastening, a familiar concept in the Old Testament ( Psalm 38:1, Proverbs 3:11-12, Micah 6:13). Note that this verse lists the effects of God"s chastisement in a progressive order. The phrase "many are weak" refers not so much to physical weakness, but to spiritual and mental weakness. It describes a Christian who is beat down and overcome in heart and soul because of the stress of circumstances around him and the lack of peace and rest in God. "Sickly" refers to the sickness in the physical body as another aspect of divine chastisement. "Sleep" refers to the death of the saints when the Lord takes some believers home before their promised time of departure from this earth life, meaning some Christians die before their seventy-eighty years of promise are fulfilled ( Psalm 90:10). We see this early death in Proverbs for those who reject God"s correction ( Proverbs 5:23).

Psalm 90:10, "The days of our years are threescore years and ten; and if by reason of strength they be fourscore years, yet is their strength labour and sorrow; for it is soon cut off, and we fly away."

Proverbs 5:23, "He shall die without instruction; and in the greatness of his folly he shall go astray."

God first allows problems to come into our lives to get our attention. These problems weaken us. If we still persist, God will allow sickness to come into our lives. Finally, if we continue in sin, God will take us home early to be in heaven.

Psalm 38:1, "O LORD, rebuke me not in thy wrath: neither chasten me in thy hot displeasure."

Proverbs 3:11-12, "My Song of Solomon , despise not the chastening of the LORD neither be weary of his correction: For whom the LORD loveth he correcteth; even as a father the son in whom he delighteth."

Micah 6:13, "Therefore also will I make thee sick in smiting thee, in making thee desolate because of thy sins."

It is interesting to compare this progression of events to that found in Isaiah 1:3-9. The people hardened their hearts ( 1 Corinthians 1:3) and became very corrupt as a result ( 1 Corinthians 1:4). This led to sickness ( 1 Corinthians 1:5-6), then divine judgment upon their nation ( 1 Corinthians 1:7-8) and eventually the destruction of all but a remnant of people ( 1 Corinthians 1:9). This was all because God gave up on His chastisement realizing it would not do any good. Thus, He says, "Why should ye be stricken any more?" ( 1 Corinthians 1:3).

Illustration - I have raised three children and each of them have required different degrees of discipline. Elisabeth received few spankings as a child because she trembled at my words of correction. When Victoria was three or four years old, she went through a period of hitting her sister Elisabeth. I initially spoke to Vicky and corrected her on this issue. When she persisted in hitting Elisabeth, I increased my degree of chastisement to stronger words, then a light spanking, then a heavy spanking. The day came when I took her into her bedroom and gave her five good spanks on her behind. I then turned her over to face me and shouted at her to never, never hit her sister again. Vicky stopped hitting her sister at this degree of discipline and she received very few spankings since then. My third child Michael received greatest degree of discipline. When he was about to turn six years old, he threw a toy at Vicky and injured her. I had been dealing with him about throwing things when he was angry. This time, I took a belt and spanked him at least ten times. I took him into the bedroom and he fell asleep. My wife and I spoke to him when he woke up and I explained to him why I had to spank him so hard on that occasion. He never threw an object since then when he was upset. Each child of God requires different degrees of chastisement as do our natural children, as explained in 1 Corinthians 11:31.

1 Corinthians 11:31 For if we would judge ourselves, we should not be judged.

1 Corinthians 11:31Word Study on "judge" - Strong says the Greek word "judge" ( διακρίνω) (G 1252) literally means, "to separate thoroughly, to withdraw, and figuratively, "to discriminate, to decide." BDAG says it means in this verse, "to judge correctly." This is the same Greek word as used in 1 Corinthians 11:29 that is translated "discerning."

1 Corinthians 11:31Comments- J. Vernon McGee says that 1 Corinthians 11:31 means if we will take the initiative to deal with and get rid of our own sins, then we will not be judged by God. 150] This verse reveals to us a fact that I have experience in my own Christian growth. It is the realization that God gives us some space to misbehave while growing up in much the same way that we patiently give our own children space to act up within a given set of bounds. Once they get out of bounds, or do not correct some bad behavior, we then inflict some form of punishment. In growing up spiritually, I have misbehaved often, and have been chastened by the Lord, as well as by my spiritual leaders. However, God is gracious, and will work with us despite our failings. He does this so that we do not become discouraged due to harshness and give up, as we can imagine our own children would do the same under harsh conditions.

150] J. Vernon McGee, The Epistle to Philemon , in Thru the Bible With J. Vernon McGee (Nashville: Thomas Nelson Pub, 1998), in Libronix Digital Library System, v 21c [CD-ROM] (Bellingham, WA: Libronix Corp, 2000-2004), comments on 1Corinthians .

Note God"s forbearance to sin in Revelation 2:21.

Revelation 2:21, "And I gave her space to repent of her fornication; and she repented not."

1 Corinthians 11:32 But when we are judged, we are chastened of the Lord, that we should not be condemned with the world.

1 Corinthians 11:32Comments- If God did not correct His children who go astray, then they would be judged with the world. This keeps us out of Hell. One of the quickest ways that a Christian can bring the chastisement of God into his life is by abusing fellow believers. I have seen this happen more than once. When a fellow believer cries out to God because of abuse from a Christian, God will quickly discipline the abusive Christian. This is why Paul brings the issue of chastisement into a passage on brotherly fellowship of the Lord"s Supper. Paul knows that some of these believers at Corinth were sick because of divine chastisement.

We must forgive and love the brethren. Jesse Duplantis tells the story of a friend of his calling him one day and asking him to come to his town and pray for his wife, who was dying of cancer. Jesse agreed to make the trip. While driving the Lord spoke to Jesse and instructed him to tell the wife to forgive her husband. Song of Solomon , when he arrived in the hospital room and met the man and his wife, he told them what the Lord had asked him to do. In an instant the woman sat up with the strength left in her body and declared that she would never forgive her husband, who committed adultery several years earlier. Needless to say, the woman was not healed and died in her sickness. 151]

151] Jesse Duplantis, Jesse Duplantis (New Orleans: Louisiana), on Trinity Broadcasting Network (Santa Ana, California).

If we offence one of the brethren, God will hear their cries and judge the believer quickly for his sins. We see in the Old Testament that the poor cry out to God against the oppression of their brethren, and God quickly judged the oppressor. We note how God judged Sodom and Gomorrah because of the cry of the oppressed:

Genesis 18:20, "And the LORD said, Because the cry of Sodom and Gomorrah is great, and because their sin is very grievous;"

God delivered the children of Israel out of bondage when they cried out to God because of their oppression:

Exodus 3:7-9, "And the LORD said, I have surely seen the affliction of my people which are in Egypt, and have heard their cry by reason of their taskmasters; for I know their sorrows; And I am come down to deliver them out of the hand of the Egyptians, and to bring them up out of that land unto a good land and a large, unto a land flowing with milk and honey; unto the place of the Canaanites, and the Hittites, and the Amorites, and the Perizzites, and the Hivites, and the Jebusites. Now therefore, behold, the cry of the children of Israel is come unto me: and I have also seen the oppression wherewith the Egyptians oppress them."

God writes this divine principle of judgment in the Mosaic Law:

Deuteronomy 15:9, "Beware that there be not a thought in thy wicked heart, saying, The seventh year, the year of release, is at hand; and thine eye be evil against thy poor brother, and thou givest him nought; and he cry unto the LORD against thee, and it be sin unto thee."

Deuteronomy 24:15, "At his day thou shalt give him his hire, neither shall the sun go down upon it; for he is poor, and setteth his heart upon it: lest he cry against thee unto the LORD, and it be sin unto thee."

Throughout the book of Judges , God delivers the children of Israel when they cry out to Him. God then judged the oppressive nations around Israel:

Job 34:28, "So that they cause the cry of the poor to come unto him, and he heareth the cry of the afflicted."

David cried out to God because of those who oppressed him, and God judged the enemies:

Psalm 12:5, "For the oppression of the poor, for the sighing of the needy, now will I arise, saith the LORD I will set him in safety from him that puffeth at him."

David spoke King Saul"s judgment:

1 Samuel 24:15, "The LORD therefore be Judges , and judge between me and thee, and see, and plead my cause, and deliver me out of thine hand."

God hears the cry of the oppressed even in the New Testament:

James 5:4, "Behold, the hire of the labourers who have reaped down your fields, which is of you kept back by fraud, crieth: and the cries of them which have reaped are entered into the ears of the Lord of sabaoth."

1 Corinthians 11:31-32Comments - Divine Judgment- Note these insightful words from Frances J. Roberts regarding these verses in 1 Corinthians 11:31-32 :

"I have sent My Holy Spirit into your hearts now that He might judge your hearts daily, so that ye may be accounted worthy to escape the day of wrath. For if ye walk now in the light of My revealed truth and if ye judge yourselves, ye shall not be judged at that coming day. And if thou shalt allow the searching eye of the Holy Spirit to find thee out, then it shall not be said to thee, ‘thy sins shall find thee out'." 152]

152] Frances J. Roberts, Come Away My Beloved (Ojai, California: King's Farspan, Inc, 1973), 171.

1 Corinthians 11:33 Wherefore, my brethren, when ye come together to eat, tarry one for another.

1 Corinthians 11:33Comments - 1 Corinthians 11:33 refers to 1 Corinthians 11:20-22, where Paul rebukes them for the manner in which they came together to eat the Lord"s Supper.

 


Copyright Statement
These files are copyrighted by the author, Gary Everett. Used by Permission.
No distribution beyond personal use without permission.

Bibliography Information
Everett, Gary H. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 11:4". Gary H. Everett's Study Notes on the Holy Scriptures. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ghe/1-corinthians-11.html. 2013.

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