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Bible Commentaries

Gary H. Everett's Study Notes on the Holy Scriptures
Leviticus

Chapter 1 Chapter 2 Chapter 7 Chapter 8
Chapter 9 Chapter 10 Chapter 11 Chapter 12
Chapter 13 Chapter 14 Chapter 15 Chapter 16
Chapter 18 Chapter 19 Chapter 20 Chapter 21
Chapter 22 Chapter 23 Chapter 24 Chapter 25
Chapter 26 Chapter 27

Book Overview - Leviticus

by Gary H. Everett

STUDY NOTES ON THE HOLY SCRIPTURES

Using a Theme-based Approach

to Identify Literary Structures

By Gary H. Everett

THE BOOK OF LEVITUCUS

January 2013Edition

All Scripture quotations in English are taken from the King James Version unless otherwise noted. Some words have been emphasized by the author of this commentary using bold or italics.

All Old Testament Scripture quotations in the Hebrew text are taken from Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia: With Westminster Hebrew Morphology, electronic ed, Stuttgart; Glenside PA: German Bible Society, Westminster Seminary, 1996, c 1925, morphology c 1991, in Libronix Digital Library System, v 21c [CD-ROM] Bellingham, WA: Libronix Corp, 2000-2004.

All New Testament Scripture quotations in the Greek text are taken from Greek New Testament, Fourth Revised Edition (with Morphology), eds. Kurt Aland, Matthew Black, Carlo M. Martini, Bruce M. Metzger, M. Robinson, and Allen Wikgren, Stuttgart: Deutsche Bibelgesellschaft (United Bible Societies), c 1966, 1993, 2006, in Libronix Digital Library System, v 21c [CD-ROM] Bellingham, WA: Libronix Corp, 2000-2004.

All Hebrew and Greek text for word studies are taken from James Strong in The New Strong"s Dictionary of Hebrew and Greek Words, Nashville: Thomas Nelson, c 1996, 1997, in Libronix Digital Library System, v 21c [CD-ROM] Bellingham, WA: Libronix Corp, 2000-2004.

The Crucifixion image on the book cover was created by the author's daughter Victoria Everett in 2012.

Gary H. Everett, 1981-2013

All rights reserved. No part of this work may be reproduced, stored, or transmitted in any form without prior permission of the author.

Foundational Theme - The Lord God is the One, True God

Hear, O Israel: The LORD our God is one LORD.

Deuteronomy 6:4

Structural Theme - Sanctification Thru Divine Service

By the which will we are sanctified through the offering

of the body of Jesus Christ once for all.

Hebrews 10:10

Imperative Theme - Israel Offers Themselves unto the Lord

I beseech you therefore, brethren, by the mercies of God,

that ye present your bodies a living sacrifice, holy, acceptable unto God,

which is your reasonable service.

Romans 12:1

INTRODUCTION TO THE BOOK OF LEVITICUS

Study Notes on the Holy Scriptures supports the view of the verbal, plenary inspiration of the biblical text of the Holy Scriptures, meaning that every word originally written down by the authors in the sixty-six books of the Holy Canon were God-breathed when recorded by men, and that the Scriptures are therefore inerrant and infallible. Any view less than this contradicts the testimony of the Holy Scriptures themselves. For this reason, the Holy Scriptures contain both divine attributes and human attributes. While textual criticism engages with the variant readings of the biblical text, acknowledging its human attributes, faith in His Word acknowledges its divine attributes. These views demand the adherence of mankind to the supreme authority of the Holy Scriptures above all else. The Holy Scriptures can only be properly interpreted by the guidance of the Holy Spirit, an aspect of biblical scholarship that is denied by liberal views, causing much misunderstanding and misinterpretation of the Holy Scriptures.

Introductory Material- The introduction to the book of Leviticus will deal with its historical setting, literary style, and theological framework. 1] These three aspects of introductory material will serve as an important foundation for understanding God's message to us today from this divinely inspired book of the Holy Scriptures.

1] Someone may associate these three categories with Hermann Gunkel's well-known three-fold approach to form criticism when categorizing the genre found within the book of Psalm: (1) "a common setting in life," (2) "thoughts and mood," (3) "literary forms." In addition, the Word Biblical Commentary uses "Form/Structure/Setting" preceding each commentary section. Although such similarities were not intentional, but rather coincidental, the author was aware of them and found encouragement from them when assigning the three-fold scheme of historical setting, literary style, and theological framework to his introductory material. See Hermann Gunkel, The Psalm: A Form-Critical Introduction, trans. Thomas M. Horner, in Biblical Series, vol 19, ed. John Reumann (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Fortress Press, 1967), 10; see also Word Biblical Commentary, eds. Bruce M. Metzger, David A. Hubbard, and Glenn W. Barker (Dallas, Texas: Word Incorporated, 1989-2007).

HISTORICAL SETTING

"We dare not divorce our study from understanding the historical setting of every passage of Scripture

if we are going to come to grips with the truth and message of the Bible."

(J. Hampton Keathley) 2]

2] J. Hampton Keathley, III, "Introduction and Historical Setting for Elijah," (Bible.org) [on-line]; accessed 23May 2012; available from http://bible.org/seriespage/introduction-and-historical-setting-elijah; Internet.

Each book of the Holy Scriptures is cloaked within a unique historical setting. An examination of this setting is useful in the interpretation of the book because it provides the context of the passage of Scripture under examination. The section on the historical setting of the book of Leviticus will provide a discussion on its title, historical background, authorship, date and place of writing, recipients, and occasion. This discussion supports the Jewish tradition that Moses was the author of the book of Leviticus , writing during the period of Israel's wilderness journey.

I. The Title

There are a number of ancient titles associated with the book of Leviticus.

A. The Ancient Jewish Title "And He Called" - Henry Swete says ancient Jews titled the five books of the Pentateuch, Proverbs , and Lamentations by identifying a key word in the opening verses. 3] The Hebrew title for Leviticus was "Wikra" ( וַיִּקְרָ֖א), which comes from the opening word of this book, meaning "and he called." Origen (c 185 - c 254) testifies to the use of this title by the Jews in his day. 4] Jerome (A.D 342to 420) was familiar with this title as well. 5] The title ( ויקרא) can be found in the standard work Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia. 6]

3] Henry B. Swete, An Introduction to Old Testament in Greek (Cambridge: University Press, 1902), 214.

4] Eusebius, the early Church historian, writes, " Leviticus , Wikra, ‘And he called';" Eusebius, Ecclesiastical History 6251-2, trans. Arthur C. McGiffert under the title The Church History of Eusebius, in A Select Library of Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers of the Christian Church, A New Series, vol 1, eds. Henry Wace and Philip Schaff (Oxford: Parker and Company, c 1890, 1905), 272-3.

5] Jerome says, "the third, Vaiecra, that is Leviticus;" See Jerome, "Prefaces to the Books of the Vulgate Version of the Old Testament: The Books of Samuel and Kings," trans. W. H. Freemantle, in A Select Library of Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers of the Christian Church, Second Series, vol 6, eds. Henry Wace and Philip Schaff (New York: The Christian Literature Company, 1893), 489-90.

6] Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia, eds. A. Alt, O. Eifelt, P. Kahle, and R. Kittle (Stuttgart: Deutsche Bibelstiftung, c 1967-77).

B. The Modern English Title "Leviticus" - Today, English bibles use the title " Leviticus ," which finds it origin in the Greek title used in the LXX " λευιτικò ν ( βίβλιον )," which means, "matters pertaining to the Levites." Philo (20 B.C - A.D 50) called the book by its Greek name λευιτικò ν or λευιτικὴ̀ βίβλιον. 7] The Greek title was known by Melito, bishop of Sardis (d. c 190). 8] The Vulgate uses the Latin title "Leviticus (liber)," 9] from which the English title is derived. 10] Since the title "Leviticus" is used as far back as the LXX, Henry Swete and George Gray believe this title is "of Alexandrian and pre-Christian origin." 11] This title reflects the contents of the book, which discussing duties of the Levitical priests.

7] Henry B. Swete, An Introduction to Old Testament in Greek (Cambridge: University Press, 1902), 215; Herbert E. Ryle, Philo and Holy Scripture (London: Macmillan and Company, 1895), xxii-xxiii.

8] Eusebius writes, "‘I learned accurately the books of the Old Testament, and send them to thee as written below. Their names are as follows: Of Moses, five books: Genesis ,, Exodus ,, Numbers ,, Leviticus , Deuteronomy; Jesus Nave, Judges , Ruth; of Kings, four books; of Chronicles, two; the Psalm of David; the Proverbs of Song of Solomon , Wisdom also, Ecclesiastes ,, Song of Solomon , Job; of Prophets, Isaiah , Jeremiah; of the twelve prophets, one book; Daniel ,, Ezekiel , Esdras. From which also I have made the extracts, dividing them into six books.' Such are the words of Melito." Eusebius, Ecclesiastical History 42614 trans. Arthur C. McGiffert under the title The Church History of Eusebius, in A Select Library of Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers of the Christian Church, A New Series, vol 1, eds. Henry Wace and Philip Schaff, (Oxford: Parker and Company, c 1890, 1905), 206.

9] Biblia Sacra Juxta Vulgatam Clementinam, ed. electronica (Bellingham, WA: Logos Research Systems, Inc, 2005), in Libronix Digital Library System, v 21c [CD-ROM] (Bellingham, WA: Libronix Corp, 2000-2004).

10] Frederic Gardiner, Leviticus , translated by John P. Lange, in Lange's Commentary on the Holy Scriptures, vol 2 , editor Philip Schaff (New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1876), 1.

11] Henry B. Swete, An Introduction to Old Testament in Greek (Cambridge: University Press, 1902), 215; George B. Gray, A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on Numbers , in The International Critical Commentary on the Holy Scriptures of the Old and New Testaments, editors Charles A. Briggs, Samuel R. Driver, and Alfred Plummer (New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1903), xxi.

C. Other Titles- "The Law of the Priests" - In the Talmud the Rabbis call the book by the titles ( הַכהֲנִים תּוֹרַת) "Law of the Priests," and ( קָרְבָּנוֹת תּוֹרַת סֵפֶר) "Book of the Law of Offerings." 12]

12] C. F. Keil and F. Delitzsch, Pentateuch, vol 2, in Biblical Commentary on the Old Testament, trans. James Martin (Edinburgh: T & T Clarke, 1872), 262; John Gill references "T. Bab. Sanhedrin, fol 1032." See John Gill, Leviticus , in John Gill's Expositor, in e-Sword, v 777 [CD-ROM] (Franklin, Tennessee: e-Sword, 2000-2005), comments on introduction to Leviticus.

II. Historical Background

III. Authorship

See Introduction to the Pentateuch (Genesis Book Comments)

IV. Date

See Introduction to the Pentateuch (Genesis Book Comments)

V. Recipients

See Introduction to the Pentateuch (Genesis Book Comments)

VI. Occasion

LITERARY STYLE (GENRE)

"Perhaps the most important issue in interpretation is the issue of genre.

If we misunderstand the genre of a text, the rest of our analysis will be askew."

(Thomas Schreiner) 13]

13] Thomas R. Schreiner, Interpreting the Pauline Epistles, second edition (Grand Rapids, Michigan: Baker Academic, c 1990, 2011), 11.

Within the historical setting of the children of Israel in the wilderness, the author of the book of Leviticus chose to write using the literary style of the law. Thus, the book of Leviticus is assigned to the literary genre called "law."

There are a number of characteristics about the book of Leviticus that distinguish it from the other books of the Old Testament canon. In the area of numerology, we will look at the number seven. In the area of biblical theology, we will look at Christ in the Levitical laws.

A. Numerology: The Number Seven- The Levitical laws are built around the number "seven." It is interesting to note how often this number is use throughout the Scriptures. God uses seven years to judge nations and kings of major sins:

Genesis 41:30, "And there shall arise after them seven years of famine; and all the plenty shall be forgotten in the land of Egypt; and the famine shall consume the land;"

2 Samuel 24:13, "So Gad came to David, and told him, and said unto him, Shall seven years of famine come unto thee in thy land? or wilt thou flee three months before thine enemies, while they pursue thee? or that there be three days" pestilence in thy land? now advise, and see what answer I shall return to him that sent me."

King Nebuchadnezzar was judged for seven years:

Daniel 4:16, "Let his heart be changed from man"s, and let a beast"s heart be given unto him; and let seven times pass over him."

God uses seven days to judge individuals of minor sins and uncleanness in the Scriptures.

Leviticus 12:2, "Speak unto the children of Israel, saying, If a woman have conceived seed, and born a man child: then she shall be unclean seven days; according to the days of the separation for her infirmity shall she be unclean."

Leviticus 15:24, "And if any man lie with her at all, and her flowers be upon him, he shall be unclean seven days; and all the bed whereon he lieth shall be unclean."

Song of Solomon , why does God judge a woman and her son for seven days after childbirth? Perhaps it is as a sign that every man is born into sin. This is why a man is not circumcised until the eighth day, because he is unclean for the first seven days of his life and is not allowed into the Temple.

B. Biblical Theology: Christ in the Levitical Laws- Several passages say that these statutes are forever. Yet, Jesus Christ fulfilled the Law and did away with the old Levitical priesthood. Song of Solomon , in a sense these statutes are fulfilled through our Lord Jesus Christ as He ministers in the Heavenly Sanctuary.

Hebrews 8:1, "Now of the things which we have spoken this is the sum: We have such an high priest, who is set on the right hand of the throne of the Majesty in the heavens;A minister of the sanctuary, and of the true tabernacle, which the Lord pitched, and not man."

THEOLOGICAL FRAMEWORK

"Scholarly excellence requires a proper theological framework."

(Andreas Ksenberger) 14]

14] Andreas J. Ksenberger, Excellence: The Character of God and the Pursuit of Scholarly Virtue (Wheaton, Illinois: Crossway, 2011), 161.

Based upon the historical setting and literary style of the book of Leviticus , an examination of the purpose, thematic scheme, and literary structure to this book of the Holy Scriptures will reveal its theological framework. This introductory section will sum up its theological framework in the form of an outline, which is then used to identify smaller units or pericopes within the book of Leviticus for preaching and teaching passages of Scripture while following the overriding message of the book. Following this outline allows the minister of the Gospel of Jesus Christ to take his followers on a spiritual journey that brings them to the same destination that the author intended his readers to reach.

VII. Purpose

VIII. Thematic Scheme

The Pentateuch is woven together as the first major division of the Holy Scriptures with a three-fold thematic scheme. (1) Primary Theme- The primary, foundational theme of the Pentateuch is the claim found in Deuteronomy 6:4 and known to the Jews as "the Shema," a verse that declares the God of Israel is one, true and living God, a theme that undergirds all five books of the Pentateuch. (2) Secondary Theme- Each book of the Pentateuch has a secondary theme that supports this central theme, providing the evidence to prove that the God of Israel is one God, who had dominion over all other gods worshipped by depraved humanity. Collectively, the secondary themes of the five books of the Pentateuch reveal the establishment of the nation of Israel above the nations of the earth through worship of YHWH, who has chosen Israel through His foreknowledge and divine election to be His chosen method of bringing redemption to mankind. The five books of the Pentateuch form a thematic scheme of God's plan of redemption for the nation of Israel and for the heathen nations with their secondary themes. This thematic scheme follows the structure found in Romans 8:29-30, which is predestination, calling, justification, and glorification. (3) The Third Theme- The third theme of the Pentateuch is an imperative theme, and it is also found in the Shema, where Moses commands Israel to love YHWH their God with all of one's heart, mind, and strength ( Deuteronomy 6:5).

The book of Leviticus offers a three-fold thematic scheme that supports the central claim of the Pentateuch, the claim found in Deuteronomy 6:4 and known to the Jews as "the Shema," a verse that declares the God of Israel is one, true and living God, a theme that undergirds all five books of the Pentateuch. Thus, the foundational theme of Leviticus is the central claim of the Pentateuch, a theme shared by all five books in this division of the Holy Scriptures. The book of Leviticus carries a secondary theme that emphasizes divine service. After the Lord gave Israel the Mosaic Law and had them build the Tabernacle in order to obey the Law, He gave the tribe of Levi the divine service of ministering in the Tabernacle. The book of Leviticus has a third, imperative theme. The Levites were to offer themselves to the Lord in the divine service of the Tabernacle for perpetual generations as a part of Israel's redemption.

A. Primary Theme (Foundational): The Lord is the One, True God- The foundational, underlying theme of the book of Leviticus is the central claim of the Pentateuch, a claim which states that the God of Israel is the one true and holy God, who is orchestrating a plan of redemption for mankind. The central claim of the Pentateuch supports the underlying theme of the Old Testament itself, which is the theme of God the Father's foreknowledge and divine election to redeem mankind through predestination, calling, justification, and redemption ( Romans 8:29-30).

The Primary Theme of Leviticus - The book of Leviticus reflects the primary theme of the Pentateuch as the Lord demonstrates His omnipotence and redemptive nature. He brings mankind back into fellowship with Himself through the ministry of the Tabernacle.

B. Secondary Theme (Structural): Divine Service - The Levites were Chosen to Divine Service in the Tabernacle - The secondary theme of the Pentateuch is the establishment of the nation of Israel by God's foreknowledge and divine election as His chosen method of bringing redemption to mankind. It is this holy nation that will give birth to the Messiah who will again restore righteousness upon the earth. We can easily see the secondary theme of the Pentateuch by examining the secondary themes of the five books of the Pentateuch, which testify of predestination, calling, justification, indoctrination, divine service, perseverance, and glorification. The book of Leviticus carries one of the secondary themes that make up the structure of the Pentateuch, that of divine service.

The Secondary Theme of the Individual Books of the Pentateuch- The secondary theme of the first part of the book of Genesis is the predestination of mankind to take dominion upon the earth, and theme of the second part is the origin of the nation of Israel, God's seed of righteousness, which He plans to use to accomplish the redemption of mankind. God will use several men who fulfilled their divine destinies to create the nation of Israel. These patriarchs, Adam, Noah, Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, and Joseph, will play leading roles in preparing for the establishment of this nation in much the same way the Gospels and the book of Acts reveals the origin of the Church and how men like Jesus Christ, Peter, Stephen, Philip the evangelist and Paul the apostle played leading roles in the establishment of the early Church. Thus, the book of Genesis is structured around the genealogies of these men of righteousness in order to explain its theme of the lineage of the nation of Israel. As the first part of the book of Exodus emphasizes deliverance, so do the Gospels testify of our redemption and set us apart from the world. As the last part of the book of Exodus emphasizes the doctrines of the nation of Israel, so to the Pauline Epistles establish Church doctrine. As the book of Leviticus establishes the order of worship for the Israelites, so does the Pastoral Epistles establish Church order. As the book of Numbers explains the perseverance of the "church" in the wilderness, so do the Catholic Epistles of Hebrews , James and 1Peter explain the perseverance of the Church. As the book of Deuteronomy is the second giving of the Law with stern warnings to persevere, so do the Catholic Epistles of 2Peter, 1, 2, 3John and Jude emphasize this same theme. Finally, the story of the conquest of Canaan in the book of Joshua is figurative of the Church entering into Heaven, as is emphasized in the book of Revelation. Note that we find two verses in the New Testament that allow us to look at the Old Testament in a figurative way of the Christian life.

Romans 15:4, "For whatsoever things were written aforetime were written for our learning, that we through patience and comfort of the scriptures might have hope."

1 Corinthians 10:11, "Now all these things happened unto them for ensamples: and they are written for our admonition, upon whom the ends of the world are come."

The Secondary Theme of Leviticus: Divine Service- After the Lord gave Israel the Mosaic Law and had them build the Tabernacle in order to obey the Law, He chose the tribe of Levi for the divine service of ministering in the Tabernacle.

C. Third Theme (Imperative): The Levites Were to Serve in the Tabernacle as a Part of Israel's Redemption- The Levites were to offer themselves to the Lord in the divine service of the Tabernacle for perpetual generations as a part of Israel's redemption. This theme reflects the third theme of the Pentateuch, which is the command to love the Lord God with all of one's heart, mind, and strength.

IX. Literary Structure

The book of Leviticus is primarily made up of Levitical codes that the children of Israel were to implement into their religious worship system. There will be laws, or codes, concerning sacrificial offerings ( Leviticus 1:1 to Leviticus 7:38), rituals of consecration for the priests ( Leviticus 8:1-36) and the people ( Leviticus 9:1-24), dietary laws ( Leviticus 11:1-47), purification laws ( Leviticus 12:1 to Leviticus 15:33), the Day of Atonement ( Leviticus 16:1-34), and the lengthy commonly passage called the Holiness Code ( Leviticus 17:1 to Leviticus 27:34).

It is possible to see the three-fold nature of man reflected in the Levitical codes, whose purpose was to sanctify the whole Prayer of Manasseh , spirit, body, and soul. The laws concerning sacrificial offerings and the consecration of the priests and the people reflect the dedication and sanctification of a person's heart towards the Lord ( Leviticus 1:1 to Leviticus 10:20). The dietary and purification laws reflect the sanctification of a person's body towards the Lord ( Leviticus 11:1 to Leviticus 15:33). The Day of Atonement and Holiness Code reflect the sanctification of a person's mind towards the Lord ( Leviticus 16:1 to Leviticus 27:34).

X. Outline of Book

Here is a proposed brief outline of the book of Leviticus organized by themes:

Spiritual Sanctification

I. Laws of the Sacrificial Offerings ( Leviticus 1:1 to Leviticus 7:38) - Leviticus 1:1 to Leviticus 7:38 deals with the laws for making sixkinds of sacrificial offerings.

A. Burnt Offerings ( Leviticus 1:3-17) (All is burnt)

1. From the herd— Leviticus 1:3-9

2. From the flock— Leviticus 1:10-13

3. Birds— Leviticus 1:14-17

B. Grain Offering (Meat means cereal or meal) ( Leviticus 2:1-16) (The Priest partakes of some)

1. Unbaked— Leviticus 2:1-3

2. Baked in oven, griddled, a pan— Leviticus 2:4-10

3. Unleaven— Leviticus 2:11-12

4. Salted— Leviticus 2:13

5. Fresh grain— Leviticus 2:14-16

C. Peace Offerings ( Leviticus 3:1-17)

1. From herd— Leviticus 3:1-5

2. From Flock— Leviticus 3:6-11

3. A goat— Leviticus 3:12-17

D. Sin Offerings ( Leviticus 4:1-35) (Unintentional sins)

1. of anointed priest— Leviticus 4:3-12

2. of the whole congregation— Leviticus 4:13-21

3. of a leader— Leviticus 4:22-26

4. of the common people— Leviticus 4:27-35

E. Guilt Offerings ( Leviticus 5:1 to Leviticus 6:7)

1. how to sin— Leviticus 5:1-5

2. of flock lamb or goat— Leviticus 5:6

3. 2turtle doves or pigeons— Leviticus 5:7-10

4. 1/10 of ephah of fine flour— Leviticus 5:11

5. The Atonement— Leviticus 5:12-13

F. Trespass Offerings ( Leviticus 5:14 to Leviticus 6:7)

1. Against the Lord— Leviticus 5:14-19

2. Against Man— Leviticus 6:1-7

G. Additional regulations for the five offerings ( Leviticus 6:8 to Leviticus 7:38)

1. Burnt Offering — Leviticus 6:8-13

2. Cereal Offering — Leviticus 6:14-18

3. Sin Offering — Leviticus 6:24-30

4. Guilt Offering — Leviticus 7:1-10

5. Peace Offering — Leviticus 7:11-21

6. Regulations on Blood/Fat — Leviticus 7:22-27

7. The Portions for the Priests — Leviticus 7:28-36

8. Summary — Leviticus 7:37-38

II. The Consecration of the Priests, the Temple and its Articles ( Leviticus 8:1-36)

III. The Consecration of the People ( Leviticus 9:1-24)

IV. The Punishment of Nadab and Abihu For Violating Temple Regulations ( Leviticus 10:1-20)

Physical Sanctification

V. Dietary Laws ( Leviticus 11:1-47)

VI. Laws of Purification ( Leviticus 12:1 to Leviticus 15:33)

A. Consecration After Childbirth ( Leviticus 12:1-8)

B. The Law of the Leper & His Cleansing ( Leviticus 13:1 to Leviticus 14:57)

C. The Law of Unclean Discharge ( Leviticus 15:1-33)

Mental Sanctification

VII. The Day of Atonement ( Leviticus 16:1-34)

VIII. The Holiness Code ( Leviticus 17:1 to Leviticus 27:34) - The final chapters of Leviticus are commonly referred to as "The Holiness Code."

A. Laws Concerning Blood ( Leviticus 17:1-16)

B. Laws Concerning Sexual Sins ( Leviticus 18:1-30)

1. Intro: Charge to Keep Commandments— Leviticus 18:1-5

2. Sin of Incest— Leviticus 18:6-18

3. Sin of Laying with woman in uncleanness— Leviticus 18:19

4. Sin of Adultery— Leviticus 18:20

5. Sin of Child Sacrificing— Leviticus 18:21

6. Sin of Homosexuality— Leviticus 18:22

7. Sin of Bestiality— Leviticus 18:23

8. Conclusion: God's Warning of Judgment — Leviticus 18:24-30

C. Laws Concerning Witchcraft and Sexual Immorality ( Leviticus 19:1 to Leviticus 20:27)

D. Priestly Codes ( Leviticus 21:1 to Leviticus 22:33)

E. The Jewish Feasts ( Leviticus 23:1-44)

1. Introduction— Leviticus 23:1-2

2. The Sabbath— Leviticus 23:3

3. The Passover— Leviticus 23:4-8

4. The Feast of Firstfruits— Leviticus 23:9-14

5. The Feast of Weeks— Leviticus 23:15-22

6. The Feast of Trumpets— Leviticus 23:23-25

7. The Day of Atonement— Leviticus 23:26-32

8. The Feast of Tabernacles— Leviticus 23:33-43

9. Conclusion— Leviticus 23:44

F. The Tabernacle Lamps and Shewbread ( Leviticus 24:1-9)

G. Laws Concerning Blasphemy ( Leviticus 24:10-23)

H. The Sabbath and Year of Jubilee ( Leviticus 25:1-22)

I. The Law of Redemption of Property ( Leviticus 25:23-38)

J. The Law Concerning Slavery ( Leviticus 25:39-55)

K. The Law of Blessings and Curses ( Leviticus 26:1-46)

L. The Law of Dedication ( Leviticus 27:1-34)

BIBLIOGRAPHY

COMMENTARY BIBLIOGRAPHY

Gardiner, Frederic. Leviticus. Trans. John P. Lange. In Lange's Commentary on the Holy Scriptures, vol 2. Editor Philip Schaff. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1876.

Gray, George B. A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on Numbers. In The International Critical Commentary on the Holy Scriptures of the Old and New Testaments. Editors, Charles A. Briggs, Samuel R. Driver, and Alfred Plummer. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1903.

Hartley, John E. Leviticus. In Word Biblical Commentary: 58 Volumes on CD-Rom, vol 4. Eds. Bruce M. Metzger, David A. Hubbard and Glenn W. Barker. Dallas: Word Inc, 2002. In Libronix Digital Library System, v 30b [CD-ROM] Bellingham, WA: Libronix Corp, 2004.

Metzger, Bruce M, David A. Hubbard, and Glenn W. Barker, eds. Word Biblical Commentary. Dallas, Texas: Word Incorporated, 1989-2007.

Radmacher, Earl D, Ronald B. Allen, and H. Wayne House, eds. Nelson's New Illustrated Bible Commentary. Nashville, Thomas Nelson Publishers, 1999. In Libronix Digital Library System, v 21c [CD-ROM] Bellingham, WA: Libronix Corp, 2000-2004.

GENERAL BIBLIOGRAPHY

Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia. Eds. A. Alt, O. Eifelt, P. Kahle, and R. Kittle. Stuttgart: Deutsche Bibelstiftung, c 1967-77.

Biblia Sacra Juxta Vulgatam Clementinam. Ed. Electronica. Bellingham, WA: Logos Research Systems, Inc, 2005. In Libronix Digital Library System, v 21c [CD-ROM] Bellingham, WA: Libronix Corp, 2000-2004.

The Book of Jubilees. Trans. R. H. Charles. In The Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha of the Old Testament in English With Introductions and Critical and Explanatory Notes to the Several Books, vol 2, ed. R. H. Charles, 1-82. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1913.

Bruce, F. F. The Books and the Parchments. Old Tappan, New Jersey: Fleming H. Revell Company, 1963.

Etheridge, J. W. The Targums of Onkelos and Jonathan ben Uzziel on the Pentateuch; with the Fragments of the Jerusalem Targum: from the Chaldee. London: Longman, Green, Longman, Roberts, and Green, 1865.

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EXEGESIS AND COMMENTS

Lectionary Calendar
Monday, October 14th, 2019
the Week of Proper 23 / Ordinary 28
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