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Bible Commentaries

Gary H. Everett's Study Notes on the Holy Scriptures
Matthew 8

 

 

Other Authors
Verse 1

The Work of the Kingdom - The emphasis of Matthew 8:1 to Matthew 11:1 is about the work of the Kingdom of God. After Jesus Christ is inaugurated King in the narrative material of Matthew 3:1 to Matthew 4:11, the Kingdom of God comes ( Matthew 4:12-25). Jesus then gives His inaugural address, which we call the Sermon on the Mount ( Matthew 5:1 to Matthew 7:29). He is now ready to teach His disciples the work of the Kingdom ( Matthew 8:1 to Matthew 11:1). The Gospel of Matthew will follow the pattern of presenting narrative material followed by a major discourse that relates to the narrative material. In the same way, the Sermon on the Mount was related to the narrative material preceding it. We now move into a new section of the Gospel made up of narrative material ( Matthew 8:1 to Matthew 9:38) followed by Jesus' second discourse ( Matthew 10:1 to Matthew 11:1). The narrative material in this section gives us the story of Jesus training the twelve disciples by example as He works miracles and healings so that He can then send them out to do the same. 398] This narrative material records ten particular miracles that Jesus performed covering a full spectrum of types of healings and miracles, as well as two accounts of Jesus healing the multitudes, ending with a call for labourers to enter the harvest field. Thus, the discourse where Jesus sends out disciples into this harvest field naturally follows this narrative. One obvious literary structure that ties this narrative to the discourse that follows is the phrase "healing all sickness and all disease," a phrase the author uses to close the narrative material ( Matthew 9:35) and repeats it in the opening of the discourse material ( Matthew 10:1). This second major division of material in the Gospel of Matthew ( Matthew 8:1 to Matthew 11:1) reflects the theme of the Pastoral Epistles in that both of them emphasize divine service in the Kingdom of Heaven and the New Testament Church.

398] The thematic relationship between the narrative material ( to 9:38) and the discourse that follows (10:1 to 10:42) has already been recognized in scholarship. For example, Benjamin Bacon discusses their parallel themes by saying, "The theme of Mt"s second Book appears in both its narrative and discourse divisions. The compilation is intended to meet the needs of the itinerant ‘gospeller'…The ten mighty works of Jesus related consecutively in chh 8 f. form thus the most appropriate possible prelude to the Discourse of ch 10. They advance from simple healings in the first group (8:1-17) to mastery of unclean spirits (cf. Mark 3:15) in the second (8:18-34), and finally in 9:1-26 to actual raising of the dead to life. The appended two healings of blind and deaf-mute in 9:27-34form something of an anti-climax, but are seemingly attached to complete a list of ten." See Benjamin W. Bacon, Studies in Matthew (New York: Henry Holt and Company, 1930), 361-362.

The one Old Testament prophecy of this division in Matthew's Gospel is Matthew 8:17, which quotes Isaiah 53:4 and simply states the office and ministry and calling of the Church of Jesus Christ, reflecting the theme of divine service in this division of Matthew.

Matthew 8:17, "That it might be fulfilled which was spoken by Esaias the prophet, saying, Himself took our infirmities, and bare our sicknesses."

Isaiah 53:4, "Surely he hath borne our griefs, and carried our sorrows: yet we did esteem him stricken, smitten of God, and afflicted."

The section of Matthew emphasizing sanctification through divine service ( Matthew 8:1 to Matthew 11:1) closes with a transitional sentence that concludes each of the five discourses, telling us that Jesus had ended His teaching ( Matthew 11:1).

Matthew 11:1, "And it came to pass, when Jesus had made an end of commanding his twelve disciples, he departed thence to teach and to preach in their cities."

Literary Evidence of a Common Theme between the Second Narrative Section and the Discourse that Follows - There is literary evidence that the second narrative section shares a common theme with the discourse that follows. The motif of Jesus' authority is first mentioned at the conclusion of the Sermon on the Mount ( Matthew 7:29); but it is carried forward into the next narrative section ( Matthew 8:9; Matthew 9:6; Matthew 9:8) as Jesus demonstrates to His disciples His authority over the storm, over the paralytic, and over the leper. He will then commission twelve disciples by giving them this same authority to carry out public ministry ( Matthew 10:1). While the Greek word ἐ ξουσί α is used five times within Matthew 7:29 to Matthew 10:1, it only occurs five other times outside this passage in Matthew's Gospel ( Matthew 21:23 2], 24, 27; Matthew 28:18). 399] Thus, the authority motif is clearly present here. This authority motif provides literary evidence that the narrative material ( Matthew 8-9) reflects the theme of the discourse that follows ( Matthew 10). This literary evidence reflects the common theme between the second narrative and discourse of divine service in the Kingdom of Heaven.

399] Christopher R. Smith, "Literary Evidences of a FiveFold Structure in the Gospel of Matthew ," in New Testament Studies 43 (1997): 545.

Sanctification: Divine Service- Leviticus Versus The Second Discourse, which Establishes the Divine Service of the Ministry- As the book of Leviticus sets in order the Levitical priesthood, so did Jesus Christ call out His the twelve apostles and send them forth to serve the Lord in the ministry in Matthew 10:1-42. The narrative passage in Matthew 8:1 to Matthew 9:38 emphasizes Jesus performing the work of the Kingdom in preparation for Him calling forth and sending out the twelve to do these same works in His second discourse in Matthew 10:1-42. Thus, we establish a parallel with Leviticus and the second discourse because they both establish the divine service for those called into the ministry. The one Old Testament prophecy of this division in Matthew's Gospel is Matthew 8:17, which quotes Isaiah 54:4 and simply states the office and ministry and calling of the Church of Jesus Christ.

Matthew 8:17, "That it might be fulfilled which was spoken by Esaias the prophet, saying, Himself took our infirmities, and bare our sicknesses."

Isaiah 53:4, "Surely he hath borne our griefs, and carried our sorrows: yet we did esteem him stricken, smitten of God, and afflicted."

Outline - Here is a proposed outline:

1. Narrative: Jesus at Work Training the Disciples — Matthew 8:1 to Matthew 9:38

2. The Second Discourse: Sending Out the Twelve — Matthew 10:1 to Matthew 11:1


Verses 1-17

Three Miracles Demonstrating God's Will to Heal All (Man's Mind: Understanding God's Will for Healing) - The three miracles of healing recorded in Matthew 8:1-17 show us that Jesus was willing and able to heal all types of diseases. 410] These three healings clearly demonstrate God's will that everyone be healed ( Matthew 8:2-3; Matthew 8:7). Prior to sending out the disciples, Jesus demonstrated to them God's plan of redemption for Israel included divine healing for everyone. The key verses in this passage of Scripture are Matthew 8:16-17, which is the conclusion to these three miracles, where Jesus healed them all, demonstrating that healing is a part of the atonement. The disciples were being trained by these examples of healing prior to being sent out in the next discourse, although they did not yet know this was about to take place. Part of their preparation for ministry was to understand that they were to go out and freely heal everyone, for this was God's will. This passage of Scripture testifies to the fact that the atonement of Jesus Christ is unlimited not only in respect to the forgiveness of the sins of all mankind, unlimited in respect of healing as well.

410] Alfred Plummer calls these triplicate of miracles "three miracles of healing," in contrast to the other triplicate of miracles in this same narrative section of Matthew. See Alfred Plummer, An Exegetical Commentary on the Gospel According to S. Matthew (New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1910), 128.

Outline - Here is a proposed outline:

1. A Leper — Matthew 8:1-4

2. The Centurion's Servant — Matthew 8:5-13

3. Peter's Mother-in-Law & the Multitudes — Matthew 8:14-17

Comparison of Parallel Passages- When we look the parallel passage in John's Gospel of Jesus healing the centurion's servant, we see that John used this miracle as a testimony of how the Gentiles were accepting Jesus' ministry. Thus, we can suggest that these three miracles recorded in Matthew's Gospel give us an example of how Jesus was willing to heal the sinner, represented by the leper, to heal the Gentiles, represented by the centurion's servant, and to heal the Jew, represented by Peter's mother-in-law. Matthew 8:16-17 will emphasize this point by stating that Jesus healed all who were sick, then he quotes Isaiah 53:4 which tells us that Jesus bore all of our sicknesses and all of our diseases.

Matthew 8:1-4Jesus Cleanses a Leper ( Mark 1:40-45, Luke 5:12-16) - Matthew 8:1-4 tells us of the healing of a leper, which is the first of three testimonies that God is willing to heal everyone.

It takes no faith to say that God is able, for we all know that God is able. The fallen angels know that God is able, for they know his power. However, it takes faith to say, "He will." God says that He is able when He reveals His power; but He reveals His love when He says, "I will." The leper believed in God's power, knowing that Jesus was able; but He did not know God's love until Jesus said, "I will."

The Transition of Themes Reflected in the Story of Jesus Cleansing a Leper - The Gospel of Matthew makes a transition in its thematic scheme from an emphasis upon doctrinal to divine service as Jesus now demonstrates the healing ministry to His disciples by healing the leper. However, the teachings of the Sermon on the Mount continue to be reflected in Jesus' command to obey the Law of Moses by presenting a gift to the priest. 411]

411] Christopher R. Smith, "Literary Evidences of a FiveFold Structure in the Gospel of Matthew ," in New Testament Studies 43 (1997): 549-550.

The Leper as an Outcast- We understand from the narrative story in Matthew 8:1-4 that the leper was at the bottom of the mountain when Jesus came down. This was because a leper was an outcast and would have been driven away by the people had he tried to join the crowd and hear God's Word.

Jesus' Strategy for His Public Ministry- After healing him Jesus warns this man not to tell anyone about this healing, but rather go to the priest an offer a gift unto God as a way of thanking Jesus for healing him. It appears that when Jesus began His public ministry, He did not want large crowds to follow Him so that He could freely move about and teach in the synagogues and in the Temple. So He tries to keep a low profile while working miracles. Mark's version of the story tells us that because the leper proclaimed this miracle abroad, Jesus could no longer enter into the city. Luke tells us that He rather withdrew Himself to pray.

Matthew 8:1 When he was come down from the mountain, great multitudes followed him.

Matthew 8:1 — "When he was come down from the mountain" - Comments- Since the Sermon on the Mount reflects much of the Mosaic Law, so does this picture of Jesus coming down from the mountain have a similarity in the event of Moses coming down from Mount Sinai.

Matthew 8:2 And, behold, there came a leper and worshipped him, saying, Lord, if thou wilt, thou canst make me clean.

Matthew 8:3 And Jesus put forth his hand, and touched him, saying, I will; be thou clean. And immediately his leprosy was cleansed.

Matthew 8:3Comments - The touch of Jesus testified of His desire to heal the leper. Thus, the touch was a demonstration of God's love towards the leper. The disease was contagious to the touch; yet Jesus showed by His touch that He was both able and willing to heal him.

The healing of the leper, among many that Jesus done, was recorded by the inspiration of the Holy Spirit so that we might know God's will on the subject of healing. The leper was questioning Jesus" willingness. Here Jesus emphasizes His divine will in this healing. Note Jesus' willingness, desire, and effort to heal all those in need. In Matthew 8:3 Jesus told the leper "I will." In Matthew 8:7 He tells the centurion the same thing. We see here God"s willingness to heal people.

Jesus' will for healing is always "Yes!" That Isaiah , God does chasten us with sickness and the wicked are still under the curse, which includes sickness and disease. But He wants us to come out from this bondage and not live in it. He came to set the captives free.

Matthew 8:4 And Jesus saith unto him, See thou tell no man; but go thy way, shew thyself to the priest, and offer the gift that Moses commanded, for a testimony unto them.

Matthew 8:4 — "And Jesus saith unto him, See thou tell no man" - Comments- In one country where Jesus was rejected ( Luke 8:39), Jesus tells the healed man to tell the Gadarenes what God has done; but in a place where people received Him, He told them to be silent about what God had done ( Matthew 8:4, Luke 5:14; Luke 8:56). Why did He do this? Perhaps because Jesus knew that He could not return to the country of the Gadarenes and there would be no one else to preach the Gospel to them; but in the regions where multitudes came out to hear Jesus, He needed the liberty to move about and to teach to smaller crowds in order to better communicate the Good News. Jesus had a work to do and a limited time to accomplish His work on earth before His Passion. Popularity would have restricted His movements, and brought difficulty from the Jewish leaders, and even the Roman military.

As a business manager, I have learned many times the importance of keeping a low profile. Many business decisions are confidential. These decisions are to be kept in as few ears as possible. Publicity can bring gossip, stories, and reactions that make daily business difficult. Jesus did not want attention and thus, crowds following Him. He had a job to do, and a lot of publicity would have made His job more difficult. I have done ministry in a foreign land. The principle was the same, to keep a low public profile.

Matthew 8:5-13Jesus Heals the Centurion's Servant ( Luke 7:1-10, John 4:43-54) - Matthew 8:5-15 tells us the story of Jesus healing the centurion's servant as a second testimony of God's will to heal everyone. One important truth revealed in this passage of Scripture is the centurion"s faith, which was limited to Jesus' spoken word, compared to others who wanted Him to lay hands upon them, or touch His garments. Note that Jesus also marveled at the great faith of the Syro-Phoenician woman in Matthew 15:21-28. These were the only two people that Jesus ever commended for having "great faith." Both limited their answer to prayer to the words of Jesus. Neither of these two individuals were Israelites.

Joseph Prince tells the story of when the Lord spoke to him to study about the centurion and the Syro-Phoenician woman in regards to his teachings on grace. The Lord asked him to note the one thing that they both had in common. He looked at each character carefully, but only saw their differences. One was a woman, and the other a man. One was an illustrious Roman soldier, the other a poor woman. He finally asked the Lord for the answer, and He replied that they were both Gentiles. Therefore, they did not know the Law or its condemnation. They were only conscience of Jesus Christ and the grace that He was liberally bestowing upon the people. In contrast, the Pharisees were fully conscience of the Law, and as a result of this mindset, they could not accept the grace of God being given to mankind through Jesus Christ. The Pharisees could only see men as condemned sinners unqualified for God's grace. 412]

412] Joseph Prince, Destined to Reign, on Lighthouse Television (Kampala, Uganda), television program, 8 December 2009.

Matthew 8:7 And Jesus saith unto him, I will come and heal him.

Matthew 8:7"I will come and heal him" - Comments- Note Jesus' eagerness to heal him. This reflects God's willingness of great desire to heal, especially His own children. In Matthew 8:3, Jesus told the leper "I will." In Matthew 8:7, He tells the centurion the same thing. We see here God"s willingness to heal people.

Matthew 8:8 The centurion answered and said, Lord, I am not worthy that thou shouldest come under my roof: but speak the word only, and my servant shall be healed.

Matthew 8:8"The centurion answered and said, Lord, I am not worthy that thou shouldest come under my roof" - Comments- This was a confession showing humility.

Matthew 8:8 — "but speak the word only, and my servant shall be healed" - Comments- It takes the greatest amount of faith to be healed simply by believing and acting upon God's word, without the laying out of hands, anointing, etc.

Matthew 8:8Comments- The centurion (1) recognized the authority of Jesus' word and (2) limited his faith to God's (Jesus') Word alone. Hence, Jesus responds in Matthew 8:10 by commending this man for having great faith. Note also the Syro-Phoenician woman responded to Jesus the same way. She was after any of the words of Jesus that she might be able to gather in order to receive healing.

Note that some people's faith asked Jesus to act in certain ways, or their faith required themselves to act in certain ways.

1. Matthew 9:18-25 - Note verse 18 - She requested Jesus to lay His hand upon her, so in verse 25, Jesus met that request.

2. Matthew 9:20-22 - She needed to touch His garment (verse 21). When she did (verse 20), she was healed.

3. John 20:24-29 - If Thomas could see the nail prints of His hands, and thrust his hand in His side, he would believe (verse 25). In verse 27, Jesus met his request of faith.

Matthew 8:10 When Jesus heard it, he marvelled, and said to them that followed, Verily I say unto you, I have not found so great faith, no, not in Israel.

Matthew 8:10Comments- Jesus marveled on two occasions. He marveled at the centurion's faith ( Matthew 8:10, Luke 7:9), and He marveled at the unbelief of the people in His home town ( Mark 6:6).

Mark 6:6, "And he marvelled because of their unbelief. And he went round about the villages, teaching."

Matthew 8:12 But the children of the kingdom shall be cast out into outer darkness: there shall be weeping and gnashing of teeth.

Matthew 8:12Comments- The phrase "outer darkness" is used three times in the Scriptures and is unique to the Gospel of Matthew ( Matthew 8:12; Matthew 22:13; Matthew 25:30). The identification of this place does not necessarily refer to Hell. The Parable of the Talent ( Matthew 25:14-30) tells us that the Lord gave one talent unto one of his servant. This would represent a believer and not a sinner, but an unfaithful believer with the goods that God had given to this servant to use in the work of the kingdom. This unprofitable servant was cast into outer darkness, where there shall be weeping and gnashing of teeth.

In his book The Final Quest Rick Joyner likens the five foolish virgins to those Christians who get saved, but do not live for the Lord ( Matthew 25:1-13). They live for themselves and do know the presence and work of the Holy Spirit in their lives. This is like the unprofitable servant ( Matthew 25:30). When these lazy people appear before the judgment seat of Christ, they will suffer tremendous grief for not having served the Lord through the presence of the Holy Spirit. This is meant by the statement, "there shall be weeping and gnashing of teeth." They will suffer the loss of all things, except their souls, according to 1 Corinthians 3:13-15. Rick Joyner met them on the way to the throne in a place distant from the throne called "outer darkness." One witness to him called it the "lowest part of Heaven." After this witness experienced the Judgment Seat of Christ, his sins were forgiven, and he no longer felt the guilt and shame of his former sins, although he remembered them. 413]

413] Rick Joyner, The Final Quest (Charlotte, North Carolina: Morning Star Publications, 1977), 86-90.

However, we find the phrase "outer darkness" in the New Testament Apocrypha writing The Revelation of Paul. In this ancient writing it is used to describe the place where scornful sinners are taken after death to be tormented by the angel Tartaruch.

"Let him therefore be handed over to the angel Tartaruch, who is set over the punishments, and let him place him in outer darkness, where there is weeping and gnashing of teeth, and let him be there till the great day of judgment. And after these things I heard the voice of angels and archangels saying: Thou art just, Lord, and thy judgment is just." (The Revelation of Paul 16) (ANF 8)

Matthew 8:10-12Comments - The Centurion was a Roman- Note that the centurion was not an Israelite, but a Roman. Thus, in Matthew 8:10-12, Jesus is making a reference to God's salvation that will come to many Gentiles and the rejection that will come to many Israelites. In distinguishing between the faith of the Centurion and the Israelites ( Matthew 8:10), He acknowledges the three people groups of redemptive history; the Jew, the Gentile and the Church ( 1 Corinthians 10:32). He then prophesies of the age of the Church by which the nations will be grafted into the vine of Israel ( Matthew 8:11) and Israel's rejection of their Messiah ( Matthew 8:12). Paul will expound upon this aspect of God's plan of redemption in Romans 9-11.

1 Corinthians 10:32, "Give none offence, neither to the Jews, nor to the Gentiles, nor to the church of God:"

Matthew 8:13 And Jesus said unto the centurion, Go thy way; and as thou hast believed, so be it done unto thee. And his servant was healed in the selfsame hour.

Matthew 8:13Comments- Note that the servant was healed according to the faith of the centurion, and not from his own faith. This is an example of intercession.

Matthew 8:14-17 — Peter's Mother-in-Law and the Multitudes ( Mark 1:29-31, Luke 4:38-39) - Matthew 8:14-17 gives us the third miracle testifying of God's will to heal everyone. In these verses, Matthew demonstrates that Jesus did not express His will to heal only two individuals, but His desire was to heal everyone, testifying how He healed Peter's mother-in-law, then all who came to Him.

Matthew 8:14 And when Jesus was come into Peter"s house, he saw his wife"s mother laid, and sick of a fever.

Matthew 8:15 And he touched her hand, and the fever left her: and she arose, and ministered unto them.

Matthew 8:16 When the even was come, they brought unto him many that were possessed with devils: and he cast out the spirits with his word, and healed all that were sick:

Matthew 8:17 That it might be fulfilled which was spoken by Esaias the prophet, saying, Himself took our infirmities, and bare our sicknesses.

Matthew 8:17Old Testament Quotes in the New Testament - The prophecy cited in Matthew 8:17 is taken from Isaiah 53:4.

Isaiah 53:4, "Surely he hath borne our griefs, and carried our sorrows: yet we did esteem him stricken, smitten of God, and afflicted."

Matthew 8:17 — "That it might be fulfilled which was spoken by Esaias the prophet, saying" - Comments- Comments- The phrase ἵνα πληρωθῇ (that it might be fulfilled) is unique to the Gospel of Matthew , being used nine times ( Matthew 1:22; Matthew 2:15; Matthew 2:17; Matthew 2:23; Matthew 4:14; Matthew 8:17; Matthew 12:17; Matthew 13:35; Matthew 21:4), with similar phrases being used loosely three times in other places in Matthew ( Matthew 13:14; Matthew 26:56; Matthew 27:9). 414] The reason this phrase is unique to the Gospel of Matthew is because the primary theme of this Gospel is the testimony of the Old Testament Scriptures, which states that Jesus Christ is the coming Messiah, who will reign as King of the Jews. Thus, the Gospel of Matthew continually declares that Jesus Christ fulfills Old Testament Messianic passages.

414] A tenth Matthean ἵνα πληρωθῇ formula can be found in Matthew 27:35 in the KJV. However, the rules of modern textual criticism require the omission this phrase from the UBS4 because it is not found in the earliest Greek manuscripts. Thus, only nine ἵνα πληρωθῇ formulae will be considered in this commentary.

The phrase "that it might be fulfilled which was spoken by Esaias the prophet" tells us why Jesus healed everyone. This is a purpose clause in the Greek so that it tells us that the reason, or purpose, for Jesus' healing ministry. A. B. Simpson says Jesus healed in order that He might be faithful to fulfill His character as spoken in ancient prophecy. Had He not fulfilled a healing ministry while here on earth, He would not have been true to His divine character. His character does not change, for He is the same yesterday, today and forever ( Hebrews 13:8). Therefore, in order to be true to His character, He is the same Healer today that He was two thousand years ago. He never turned anyone away in the Scriptures that came in faith. Neither will He turn you away if you will only look to Him as your Healer. 415]

415] A. B. Simpson, The Gospel of Healing, fourth edition (New York: Christian Alliance Publishing Company, 1890), chapter 1: The Scriptural Foundation no 7.

Hebrews 13:8, "Jesus Christ the same yesterday, and to day, and for ever."

Matthew 8:17"Himself took our infirmities, and bare our sicknesses" - Comments- How did Jesus pay for our healing? Before Jesus went to the Cross to shed His precious blood for our sins, He went to the whipping post in order to be beaten for our healing. 1 Peter 2:24 tells us that "by whose stripes ye were healed."

1 Peter 2:24, "Who his own self bare our sins in his own body on the tree, that we, being dead to sins, should live unto righteousness: by whose stripes ye were healed."

In order pay for our healing, it was necessary that Jesus Christ be scourged. He then went to the Cross in order to pay for our sins. Therefore, we see a two-fold purpose in His suffering and death. The reason is that man is both spiritual and physical. In his fall in the Garden of Eden, both his spiritual and physical nature were corrupted. Both are in need of redemption. Jesus' plan of redemption had to provide for the healing of our bodies as well as the forgiveness of our sins.

Matthew 8:16-17Comments- Jesus Heal Them All- Matthew 8:16-17 records the story of Jesus healing the multitudes in fulfillment of an Old Testament prophecy from Isaiah 53:4. This citation is the only Old Testament quote within the second narrative/discourse section of the Gospel of Matthew ( Matthew 8:1 to Matthew 11:1), which section emphasizes divine service in the Kingdom of Heaven.

Matthew 8:16-17 is the key verse to the previous three miracles recorded in Matthew 8:1-17, revealing the common theme that they all share, which is the demonstration of Jesus' ability and willingness to heal all of God's children of every disease. These three miracles were done in order to demonstrate to the disciples God's will to heal when they would soon be sent forth to follow the example of Jesus by healing everyone. Jesus will tell them in their commission, "Heal the sick, cleanse the lepers, raise the dead, cast out devils: freely ye have received, freely give." ( Matthew 10:8)

Matthew 8:18-22 — The Cost of Discipleship ( Mark 1:32-34, Luke 4:40-41; Luke 9:57-62) - Matthew 8:18-22 is the first of three important narrative sections placed immediately after three witnesses of Jesus' healing ministry that reflects the theme of the upcoming discourse ( Matthew 10:1 to Matthew 11:1), which is the divine call to discipleship and Christian service in the Kingdom of Heaven. Some of the disciples who were following Jesus had not counted the cost of discipleship ( Matthew 8:18-22). and Jesus responded to two rash statements by some of His followers. His response reveals the true cost of what it means to become His disciple. Following this narrative material ( Matthew 8:1 to Matthew 9:38), Jesus will select His twelve apostles by choosing those who have paid the cost of discipleship ( Matthew 10:1-4). For example, Peter will later say, "Behold, we have forsaken all, and followed thee; what shall we have therefore?" ( Matthew 19:27). Jesus asks for a commitment from men in light of God's commitment to the atonement and healing all who were sick.

Matthew 8:18 Now when Jesus saw great multitudes about him, he gave commandment to depart unto the other side.

Matthew 8:19 And a certain scribe came, and said unto him, Master, I will follow thee whithersoever thou goest.

Matthew 8:20 And Jesus saith unto him, The foxes have holes, and the birds of the air have nests; but the Son of man hath not where to lay his head.

Matthew 8:21 And another of his disciples said unto him, Lord, suffer me first to go and bury my father.

Matthew 8:22 But Jesus said unto him, Follow me; and let the dead bury their dead.

Matthew 8:22Comments- Jesus is life, and those believers in the Kingdom of God have eternal life. Therefore, when Jesus told the disciple in Matthew 8:22 to let the dead bury their dead, He was referring to those who were spiritually dead ( Ephesians 2:1).

Ephesians 2:1, "And you hath he quickened, who were dead in trespasses and sins;"


Verses 1-38

Narrative Material: Jesus at Work Training His Disciples - In Matthew 8:1 to Matthew 9:38 Jesus heals people and works miracles in order to train the twelve to go out and do the same. Thus, the narrative passage in Matthew 8:1 to Matthew 9:38 emphasizes Jesus performing the work of the Kingdom in preparation for Him calling forth and sending out the twelve to do these same works in His second discourse in Matthew 10:1 to Matthew 11:1. The emphasis in Matthew 8:1 to Matthew 9:38 of Jesus' ministry in the Kingdom of Heaven serves as a testimony to the fulfillment of Isaiah 53:4. In other words, this passage of Scripture testifies to the fact that bodily healing is a part of the atonement.

Isaiah 53:4, "Surely he hath borne our griefs, and carried our sorrows: yet we did esteem him stricken, smitten of God, and afflicted."

In this narrative section of Matthew's Gospel, the author compiles three sets of three miracle testimonies by weaving discussions on discipleship between each triplicate set of miracles. 400] The author gives us three examples of Jesus healing sick people: a leper, a centurion's servant, and Peter's mother-in-law with a fever ( Matthew 8:1-17) as a demonstration of God's ability and willingness to heal all sickness and disease of His children as part of the atonement ( Matthew 8:16-17). These three healing testimonies are followed by narrative material revealing the cost of discipleship ( Matthew 8:18-22), in which Jesus explains to the disciples that if God is willing to minister to humanity, should we not respond in love and be willing to minister for Him? Matthew next gives a second set of three miracles: Jesus takes authority over nature by calming the storm, over demons by casting them out, and over sin by forgiving the paralytic ( Matthew 8:23 to Matthew 9:8). These three miracles testify of the authority of the name of Jesus over all of creation. This second set of miracles is also followed by narrative material in which Jesus justifies the calling of disciples in the work of the Kingdom of Heaven ( Matthew 9:9-17). Matthew then gives a third set of three miracles: Jesus heals the woman with an issue of blood and restores Jarius' daughter back to life, He restores sight to the blind, and He restores speech to a dumb man ( Matthew 9:18-34). These three miracles testify of the positive effects of faith in the heart of the believer to receive healing. This testimony is again followed by narrative material regarding the prayer to send forth disciples into the harvest fields ( Matthew 9:35-38). Thus, woven in between these three groups of miracles where Jesus heals the multitudes are teachings on discipleship. 401] Once the disciples understood that there were three aspects to divine healing, they could go forth and perform the same miracles that Jesus had performed. Once they understood that it was God's Will to heal everyone, and once they saw Jesus demonstrate the authority of His name, and once they understood the role of the individual to believe God's Word, they were equipped to be sent forth in the Ministry.

400] Within Matthew 8:1 to 9:38, Matthew records ten miracles compiled into three sets of three testimonies. The number "ten" in the Scriptures reflects the concept of the concept of multiple occurrences. For example, when Jacob told Laban that he had changed his wages ten times, John Gill understands the phrase "ten times" in Numbers 14:22 as an idiom to mean a rounded number, which is equivalent to "time after time," thus "numerous times." He says that although the Jews counted ten literal occasions when Israel tempted the Lord during the wilderness journeys, Aben Ezra gives this phrase a figurative meaning of "many times." Gill lists ten literal occasions, "twice at the sea, Exodus 14:11; twice concerning water, Exodus 15:23; twice about manna, Exodus 16:2; twice about quails, Exodus 16:12; once by the calf, Exodus 32:1; and once in the wilderness of Paran, Numbers 14:1, which last and tenth was the present temptation." John Gill, Numbers , in John Gill's Expositor, in e-Sword, v 777 [CD-ROM] (Franklin, Tennessee: e-Sword, 2000-2005), comments on Numbers 14:22.

401] Craig Keener acknowledges the three sets of miracles (; 8:23-28; 9:18-34) with intervening passages where Jesus teaches others to acknowledge His authority over them (8:18-22; 9:9-17; 9:35; 9:36-37). See Craig S. Keener, A Commentary on the Gospel of Matthew (Grand Rapids, Michigan: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co, 1999), 258; Grant Osborne proposes a similar literary structure for this passage, saying, "An analysis of this section finds three blocks of three miracles each (8:1-17: 8:23-9:8; 9:18-34), broken by discipleship sections (8:18-22; 9:9-13, 14-17)." See Grant R. Osborne, Matthew , in Zondervan Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament, ed. Clinton E. Arnold (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 2010), 23.

Scholars have frequently supplied a thematic scheme to these triplicate set of miracles. For example Willoughby Allen groups these three sets of miracles as "healing, power, and restoration;" 402] Albright and Mann group these three sets of miracles as "healings, authority, and restoration;" 403] Donald Guthrie groups these triplicate of miracles as "healings, power, and restoration;" 404] and Grant Osborne says, "The first set concerns authority over illness, the second set authority over nature, demons, and paralysis, and the third set authority over disabilities and death. The primary thrust is Jesus' all-embracing power and authority…" 405] The comments regarding Jesus healing the multitudes ( Matthew 8:16-17, Matthew 9:35-38) and ministering to the publicans and sinners ( Matthew 9:10-13) suggest to the readers that Matthew recorded only a few types of miracles in order to show His disciples (and us) how Jesus could heal every type of sickness and disease presented to him. The additional topic of Jesus teachings on the cost of discipleship ( Matthew 8:18-22), the work of the disciple in the Kingdom of heaven ( Matthew 9:9-17) and the prayer to send forth disciples into the harvest fields ( Matthew 9:34-38) are interwoven within this section of material, suggesting that Jesus is preparing His disciples for the work of the ministry in the next discourse ( Matthew 10:1 to Matthew 11:1). Jesus will address the theme of the three triplicate sets of miracles in His commission to the disciples in the discourse that follows. These three themes are (1) God's ability and willingness to heal every child of God, (2) the authority of His name, and (3) the aspect of faith in the heart of the believer to receive healing. 406] Thus, Jesus equips His disciples for the work of the ministry by teaching them that healing is in the atonement, and it is implemented through the authority of the name of Jesus Christ through faith in His name.

402] Willoughby C. Allen, A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the Gospel According to S. Matthew , in The International Critical Commentary, eds. Charles Augustus Briggs and Samuel Rolles Driver (New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1907), lxv.

403] W. F. Albright, and C. S. Mann, Matthew , in Anchor Bible Commentary, vol 26 (Doubleday, London: Yale University Press, c 1971, 1987), lvii.

404] Donald Guthrie, New Testament Introduction (Downers Grover, Illinois: Intervarsity Press, 1990), 42.

405] Grant R. Osborne, Matthew , in Zondervan Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament, ed. Clinton E. Arnold (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 2010), 23.

406] Grant Osborne acknowledges the two themes of authority and faith in Matthew 8-9. See Grant R. Osborne, Matthew , in Zondervan Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament, ed. Clinton E. Arnold (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 2010), 280-281.

These three aspects of ministry in the Kingdom of God and in the New Testament Church are reflected in the life and ministry of the seventy as they cast out demons in the name of Jesus ( Luke 10:17), of Jesus as He acknowledged the faith of the Syro-Phoenician woman ( Matthew 15:28), of Peter as he healed in the name of Jesus in response to the faith of the lame man ( Acts 3:16), and of Paul as he operated in the gifts of the Spirit in response to crippled man's faith ( Acts 14:9). In contrast, Jesus could not work many miracles in Nazareth because of their unbelief ( Matthew 13:58, Mark 6:5).

Luke 10:17, "And the seventy returned again with joy, saying, Lord, even the devils are subject unto us through thy name."

Matthew 15:28, "Then Jesus answered and said unto her, O woman, great is thy faith: be it unto thee even as thou wilt. And her daughter was made whole from that very hour."

Acts 3:16, "And his name through faith in his name hath made this man strong, whom ye see and know: yea, the faith which is by him hath given him this perfect soundness in the presence of you all."

Acts 14:9, "The same heard Paul speak: who stedfastly beholding him, and perceiving that he had faith to be healed,"

Matthew 13:58, "And he did not many mighty works there because of their unbelief."

Mark 6:5, "And he could there do no mighty work, save that he laid his hands upon a few sick folk, and healed them."

Regarding the choice of miracles recorded in Matthew 8-9, it is important to note that Jesus was training the Twelve to minister healing to the people prior to the day of Pentecost when they were filled with the Holy Spirit. Therefore, Jesus is demonstrating to the Twelve how to heal apart from the anointing. This is why the first set of miracles show Jesus teaching the people that it is God's will for them to be healed, while the second set of miracles show Jesus demonstrating the authority of His name over various aspects of creation, such as sickness and disease, that are out of order, and in the third set of miracles Jesus demonstrates the role of the people in their need to respond in faith to His word to heal them. At no time in Matthew 8-9 does Jesus heal through the gifts of the Spirit and through the anointing, as we see Him doing in other Gospel passages. This is because He did not want to ask His disciples to do something that they were not yet equipped to do until the day of Pentecost.

Outline: Here is a proposed outline:

1. Three Miracles of Healings — Matthew 8:1-17

a) A Leper — Matthew 8:1-4

b) The Centurion's Servant — Matthew 8:5-13

c) Peter's Mother-in-Law — Matthew 8:14-15

d) Jesus Heals Them All — Matthew 8:16-17

2. The Cost of Discipleship — Matthew 8:18-22

3. Three Miracles of Authority Over Natural & Supernatural — Matthew 8:23 to Matthew 9:8

a) Calming the Storm — Matthew 8:23-27

b) Healing the Demoniacs — Matthew 8:28-34

c) Healing the Paralytic — Matthew 9:1-8

4. The Calling of a Disciple — Matthew 9:9-17

5. Three Miracles of Restoration — Matthew 9:18-34

a) Ruler's Daughter & Woman — Matthew 9:18-26

b) Two Blind Men — Matthew 9:27-31

c) A Dumb Man — Matthew 9:32-34

6. The Prayer for Disciples — Matthew 9:35-38

Matthew's Gospel Speaks to Man's Mind through the Testimony of Old Testament Scripture - While John's Gospel speaks to man's heart, and Mark speaks to our bodies through the miracles of physical healings, and Luke speaks to our mind through the understanding of eye-witnesses of Jesus' public ministry, Matthew speaks to our mind by giving us understanding in the Old Testament Scriptures as they testify of the Messiah. Therefore, the Gospel of Matthew is structured around the formula quotations derived from ἵνα πληρωθῇ. A study of the pericope in which the formula quotations are found reveals that Matthew has placed them within passages of testimonies that place emphasis upon the mental realm of men, since this emphasis is embedded within the fabric of this Gospel. For example, the formula quotation for the second narrative section is found in the pericope where Matthew wants us to understand that it is God's will to heal mankind because healing is in the atonement of Jesus Christ ( Matthew 8:1-17). The formula quotation for the third narrative section is found in the pericope where Matthew is teaching that men have rejected the testimony of Old Testament Scriptures ( Matthew 12:1-21).

Jesus' Authority over All of Creation - The fact that Jesus heals all diseases, takes authority over nature, and raises the dead testifies to His deity. Craig Keener 407] sees a possible allusion to this view of divine dominion in a poem by the ancient Greek philosopher Empedocles (490-430 B.C.), which reads:

407] Craig S. Keener, A Commentary on the Gospel of Matthew (Grand Rapids, Michigan: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co, 1999), 258.

"And thou shalt master every drug that e"er

Was made defense "gainst sickness and old age--

For thee alone all this I will fulfill--

And thou shalt calm the might of tireless winds,

That burst on earth and ruin seedlands; aye,

And if thou wilt, shalt thou arouse the blasts,

And watch them take their vengeance, wild and shrill,

For that before thou cowedst them. Thou shalt change

Black rain to drought, at seasons good for men,

And the long drought of summer shalt thou change

To torrents, nourishing the mountain trees.

As down they stream from ether. And thou shalt

From Hades beckon the might of perished men." (On Nature, Dominion 111) 408]

408] William Ellery Leonard, The Fragments of Empedocles (Chicago: The Open Court Publishing Company, 1908), 51-52.

In his poems, Empedocles contrasted mortality with the divine. In his words above, he makes reference to healing of sick bodies, the calming of the winds, and the resurrection of men from the dead in reference to his view of the omnipotence of the gods.

Jesus Heals the Multitudes - The Gospel of Matthew tells us a number of times how Jesus healed the multitudes.

Matthew 4:23, "And Jesus went about all Galilee, teaching in their synagogues, and preaching the gospel of the kingdom, and healing all manner of sickness and all manner of disease among the people.

Matthew 8:16, "When the even was come, they brought unto him many that were possessed with devils: and he cast out the spirits with his word, and healed all that were sick."

Matthew 9:35, "And Jesus went about all the cities and villages, teaching in their synagogues, and preaching the gospel of the kingdom, and healing every sickness and every disease among the people."

Matthew 12:15, "But when Jesus knew it, he withdrew himself from thence: and great multitudes followed him, and he healed them all;"

Matthew 14:14, "And Jesus went forth, and saw a great multitude, and was moved with compassion toward them, and he healed their sick."

Matthew 15:30, "And great multitudes came unto him, having with them those that were lame, blind, dumb, maimed, and many others, and cast them down at Jesus" feet; and he healed them:"

Jesus healed the multitudes during His ministry in Galilee because the people believed His Word; but during His ministry in Judea amidst the doubt and unbelief of the Jewish leaders, Jesus ministered by the gifts of the Spirit. For example, in one of Benny Hinn's crusades, he called out a person's name and her illness. During the time of personal healing testimonies, this lady came on the stage and told Benny Hinn that she was the lady that he called out and that the Lord healed her. She made the remark that she did not belief that God was going to heal her. Benny Hinn responded that he received a word of knowledge about her because she did not believe. 409]

409] Benny Hinn, This is Your Day (Irving, Texas), on Trinity Broadcasting Network (Santa Ana, California), television program.


Verse 23

Three Miracles Demonstrating Jesus' Authority (Man's Body: Physical Demonstration of Jesus' Divine Authority) - Matthew 8:23 to Matthew 9:8 gives us the story of three miracles performed by Jesus Christ which demonstrated His authority over all things. He had authority over nature by calming the storm; He had authority over the spirit realm by casting out demons; and He had authority as only God does to forgive the sins of mankind by forgiving the paralytic. Matthew 9:8 is the key verse to these three miracles recorded in Matthew 8:23 to Matthew 9:8, which says, "But when the multitudes saw it, they marvelled, and glorified God, which had given such power [ ἐ ξουσί α] unto men." This statement reveals the common factor that they all share, which is the demonstration of Jesus' authority over all aspects of life, over nature, over the spiritual realm, and even over sin. These three miracles were done in order to demonstrate to the disciples the authority of the name of Jesus with which they were to forth when preaching the Gospel and healing the sick. 416]

416] Alfred Plummer calls this triplicate of miracles "three miracles of power" in contrast to the other triplicate of miracles in this same narrative section of Matthew. He says these three particular miracles are grouped to demonstrate Jesus' power "over the forces of nature, over evil spirits, and over sin and its consequences." See Alfred Plummer, An Exegetical Commentary on the Gospel According to S. Matthew (New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1910), 128.

It may be possible to suggest that the storm represents the physical realm, the demons represents the spiritual realm, and the paralytic represents the human realm where only God has the authority over mankind to forgive sins. Thus, Jesus has authority over every realm of God's creation.

Outline - Here is a proposed outline:

1. The Calming the Storm — Matthew 8:23-27

2. The Healing of the Demoniacs — Matthew 8:28-34

3. The Healing of the Paralytic — Matthew 9:1-8

The Authority of the Name of Jesus- The disciples will learn to use the authority of the name of Jesus as a part of their public ministry ( Matthew 7:22, Mark 9:38; Mark 16:17, Luke 9:49; Luke 10:17, Acts 3:16).

Matthew 7:22, "Many will say to me in that day, Lord, Lord, have we not prophesied in thy name? and in thy name have cast out devils? and in thy name done many wonderful works?"

Mark 9:38, "And John answered him, saying, Master, we saw one casting out devils in thy name, and he followeth not us: and we forbad him, because he followeth not us."

Mark 16:17, "And these signs shall follow them that believe; In my name shall they cast out devils; they shall speak with new tongues;"

Luke 9:49, "And John answered and said, Master, we saw one casting out devils in thy name; and we forbad him, because he followeth not with us."

Luke 10:17, "And the seventy returned again with joy, saying, Lord, even the devils are subject unto us through thy name."

Acts 3:16, "And his name through faith in his name hath made this man strong, whom ye see and know: yea, the faith which is by him hath given him this perfect soundness in the presence of you all."

Matthew 8:23-27 — The Calming the Storm ( Mark 4:35-41, Luke 8:22-25) - Matthew 8:23-27 tells us the story of Jesus calming the storm. This story demonstrates that Jesus held authority over nature, or over the physical realm.

Matthew 8:23 And when he was entered into a ship, his disciples followed him.

Matthew 8:23Comments- Note that in Matthew 8:18-22, we are just told that the scribe and a disciple would not follow Jesus; but His true disciples do follow him in Matthew 8:23

Matthew 8:24 And, behold, there arose a great tempest in the sea, insomuch that the ship was covered with the waves: but he was asleep.

Matthew 8:24Comments- Storms are known to suddenly appear on the Lake of Galilee and take their toll on boaters. On one trip to Israel, Bob Nichols was on the lake hosting a Church group from the U.S. and the strong winds suddenly appeared and brought large waves against the ship. 417] This all appeared suddenly.

417] Bob Nichols, "Sermon," Calvary Cathedral International, Fort Worth, Texas.

Matthew 8:28-34 — The Healing of the Demoniacs ( Mark 5:1-20, Luke 8:26-39) - Matthew 8:28-34 tells us the story of Jesus healing two men possessed with a legion of demons. Jesus cast out many demons during His earthly ministry. However, I believe this story was selected because it so clearly reflected Jesus' authority over the demonic realm. This event stood out in the mind of the author because it pointed out that Jesus had the authority to deliver the worst of demoniacs. It shows that Jesus held all authority over the spiritual realm.

Matthew 8:28 And when he was come to the other side into the country of the Gergesenes, there met him two possessed with devils, coming out of the tombs, exceeding fierce, so that no man might pass by that way.

Matthew 8:29 And, behold, they cried out, saying, What have we to do with thee, Jesus, thou Son of God? art thou come hither to torment us before the time?

Matthew 8:30 And there was a good way off from them an herd of many swine feeding.

Matthew 8:30Comments- We have to ask the question of why unclean swine were being raised in a Jewish region. Although the strict Jews abstained from such meats, there was much profit in the sale of salted pork to Roman soldiers and other local people who did each this meat.

Matthew 8:31 So the devils besought him, saying, If thou cast us out, suffer us to go away into the herd of swine.

Matthew 8:32 And he said unto them, Go. And when they were come out, they went into the herd of swine: and, behold, the whole herd of swine ran violently down a steep place into the sea, and perished in the waters.

Matthew 8:31-32Comments- The Herd of Swine- One would naturally ask the question from this story of why Jesus Christ would allow the legion of demons to enter a herd of swine and it result in the destruction of the entire herd of animals. Was not this herd the livelihood of its herdsman and owner? Perhaps Jesus allowed this to happen because swine were unclean and therefore a detriment to their owner rather than a blessing. For in eating them, it would cause people to lose their health.

Matthew 8:33 And they that kept them fled, and went their ways into the city, and told every thing, and what was befallen to the possessed of the devils.

Matthew 8:34 And, behold, the whole city came out to meet Jesus: and when they saw him, they besought him that he would depart out of their coasts.

Matthew 9:1-8 — The Healing of the Paralytic ( Mark 2:1-12, Luke 5:17-26) - Matthew 9:1-8 tells the story of Jesus healing the paralytic by forgiving his sins. When comparing this narrative material in the Synoptic Gospels, their individual themes are clearly reflected. Mark makes the unique statement that He was preaching the Word unto them ( Mark 2:2), reflecting the office of the evangelist. Luke makes the unique statement that He was teaching the people and the power of the Lord was present to heal them ( Luke 5:17), reflecting the office and anointing of the prophet. Thus, we can see a clear emphasis in Mark's version of an evangelist preaching of the Gospel with signs following, which is the foundation theme of this Gospel. Luke's parallel passage emphasizes Jesus' power and anointing in the office of the prophet; and within the context of Luke's literary structure, Jesus is demonstrating to His disciples His authority over sin. Matthew makes no such comments, but rather places emphasis in this section of narrative material on His ability to heal all manner of sickness and disease in order to demonstrate the healing ministry to which He was about to commission His disciples.

This Miracle was a Demonstration that Jesus' Claim to Divinity was Accepted by God- In this passage of Scripture, Jesus performs a miracle to demonstrate His authority to forgive sin. The foundational theme of Mark's Gospel is the testimony of Jesus' works to prove His divinity (and Jews knew that only divinity could forgive their sins). In the Old Testament, the evidence that God received a person's sacrifice and granted forgiveness of sins was demonstrated when the sacrifice was received. For example, we can find examples of God coming down and consuming sacrifices as He did for Moses at the dedication of the Tabernacle ( Leviticus 9:24), for Manoah, the father of Samson ( Judges 13:19-20), for King David at the threshing floor of Ornan ( 1 Chronicles 21:26), for Solomon at the dedication of the Temple ( 2 Chronicles 7:1) and for Elijah on Mount Carmel ( 1 Kings 18:38) as a way of receiving their sacrifices. In a similar way, the evidence that Jesus has the divine power to forgive man's sins was by the fact that He healed him, since the Jews understood that sickness and sin went hand in hand. Thus, the Jews saw that Jesus' claim to divinity was accepted by God. In addition, the fact that sickness and sin went hand in hand testifies to the fact that divine healing of men's physical bodies was embedded in the Atonement of Jesus Christ.

This Miracle Demonstrated the Sinful Nature of Every Person- In this story, Jesus heals a man by first forgiving him of his sins. One reason Jesus discussed His authority to forgive sins and demonstrate this authority in front of the Pharisees was so the Jews would have no excuse in knowing Jesus and the Father (See John 15:22-24).

John 15:22-24, "If I had not come and spoken unto them, they had not had sin: but now they have no cloke for their sin. He that hateth me hateth my Father also. If I had not done among them the works which none other man did, they had not had sin: but now have they both seen and hated both me and my Father."

Matthew 9:1 And he entered into a ship, and passed over, and came into his own city.

Matthew 9:1"and came into his own city" - Comments- This city was Capernaum according to Mark 2:1, "And again he entered into Capernaum after some days; and it was noised that he was in the house." Evidently, in the beginning of His ministry, He moved from Nazareth to Capernaum.

Matthew 9:2 And, behold, they brought to him a man sick of the palsy, lying on a bed: and Jesus seeing their faith said unto the sick of the palsy; Song of Solomon , be of good cheer; thy sins be forgiven thee.

Matthew 9:2 — "and Jesus seeing their faith said unto the sick of the palsy" - Comments - Matthew 9:2 says Jesus "say their faith." That Isaiah , Jesus saw actions from this group of men that demonstrated they had faith for Jesus to heal the palsy. This statement means that it was the corporate faith of the men who carried the palsy that brought the healing of the palsy. Had one of these men discourages the others in their faith, they would have failed to deliver this man to Jesus, and there would be no healing. These men called upon Jesus for healing corporately as taught in James 5:14-15.

James 5:14-15, "Is any sick among you? let him call for the elders of the church; and let them pray over him, anointing him with oil in the name of the Lord: And the prayer of faith shall save the sick, and the Lord shall raise him up; and if he have committed sins, they shall be forgiven him."

Matthew 9:2 " Song of Solomon , be of good cheer" - Comments - The term "son" shows a relationship of endearment to the Savior. In many nations, a person who is beloved by a friend is called a Song of Solomon , daughter, father, or mother by the one who loves them. A person is saying that he embraces someone as beloved as dear to him as a member of his own family. He is saying that this person has become a part of the family.

Also, the fact that Jesus uses the word "son" and not "father" reveals that Jesus held a position of authority over this person.

We see this word "son" used again in Hebrews 2:10 in referring to the children of God in relation to Jesus Christ. This term reveals Jesus" authority over the church. It also reveals that they were born into the kingdom, as a son is born from a father.

Hebrews 2:10, "For it became him, for whom are all things, and by whom are all things, in bringing many sons unto glory, to make the captain of their salvation perfect through sufferings."

Matthew 9:3 And, behold, certain of the scribes said within themselves, This man blasphemeth.

Matthew 9:4 And Jesus knowing their thoughts said, Wherefore think ye evil in your hearts?

Matthew 9:5-6Comments- Jesus could have said either, "Thy sins be forgiven thee," or, "Arise, and walk." He said the former so that the scribes might know that Jesus did have power on earth to forgive sins.

Matthew 9:5 For whether is easier, to say, Thy sins be forgiven thee; or to say, Arise, and walk?

Matthew 9:5Comments- Jesus says both, that his sins are forgiven (verse 2), and to take up his bed and walk (verse 6).

Matthew 9:6 But that ye may know that the Son of man hath power on earth to forgive sins, (then saith he to the sick of the palsy,) Arise, take up thy bed, and go unto thine house.

Matthew 9:6Comments - In the Greek text, the word ἐ ξουσί α is placed at the beginning of Jesus' statement for emphasis.

Jesus is teaching the disciples concerning the authority that He has upon earth to minister redemption to mankind. This realm of authority will be delegated to the apostles and New Testament Church ( John 20:23), being embedded into the proclamation of the Gospel of Jesus Christ.

John 20:23, "Whose soever sins ye remit, they are remitted unto them; and whose soever sins ye retain, they are retained."

Matthew 9:7 And he arose, and departed to his house.

Matthew 9:8 But when the multitudes saw it, they marvelled, and glorified God, which had given such power unto men.

Matthew 9:8Comments - Matthew 9:8 is the key verse to the previous three miracles recorded in Matthew 8:23 to Matthew 9:8, revealing the common theme that they all share, which is the demonstration of Jesus' authority over all aspects of life, over nature, over the spiritual realm, and even over sin. These three miracles were done in order to demonstrate to the disciples the authority of the name of Jesus with which they were to forth when preaching the Gospel and healing the sick.

 


Copyright Statement
These files are copyrighted by the author, Gary Everett. Used by Permission.
No distribution beyond personal use without permission.

Bibliography Information
Everett, Gary H. "Commentary on Matthew 8:4". Gary H. Everett's Study Notes on the Holy Scriptures. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ghe/matthew-8.html. 2013.

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Sunday, November 17th, 2019
the Week of Proper 28 / Ordinary 33
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