corner graphic   Hi,    
ver. 2.0.19.05.22
Finding the new version too difficult to understand? Go to classic.studylight.org/

Bible Commentaries

Gary H. Everett's Study Notes on the Holy Scriptures
Song of Solomon 5

 

 

Verses 2-4

The Maturing Process (Scene 4: The Garden, and the Vineyards) (Maturing in Divine Service [Perseverance]) - Literal Interpretation- Song of Solomon 5:2 to Song of Solomon 8:4 describes the maturing process of marriage. The new bride has not yet entered into rest, for in Song of Solomon 5:2-8 she experiences the final test of true love in which she has to now learn to deny herself and serve her husband. Her love is tested again to prove her devotion to him ( Song of Solomon 5:2-8). The hardship and persecution that results from this test and her desire for him in the midst of this trial serves as a powerful testimony to the daughters of Jerusalem as they ask her why she loves him so dearly and why he is more special than other men ( Song of Solomon 5:9). She then describes her Lover in a way that others have not known, by describing his unique characteristics above all others ( Song of Solomon 5:10-16). This symbolizes the journey of every wife to learn about her husband and to admire his unique characteristics. Her testimony provokes these maidens to seek him with her ( Song of Solomon 6:1), and she tells them how they can find him as well, assuring them of the strong bond love that holds them together ( Song of Solomon 6:2-3).

In Song of Solomon 6:4-10 the husband expresses his love and admiration for the beauty and uniqueness of his wife. Her love has proven genuine. Just as the beloved emphasized her lover's uniqueness in Song of Solomon 5:9-16, so does he now express her uniqueness among women. In Song of Solomon 6:11-13 the Shulamite visits the vineyards for the first time since being brought from her native village to the King's palace ( Song of Solomon 6:11). This introduction to such a familiar setting seems to stir up a longing in her heart for her people and homeland ( Song of Solomon 6:12). Her people call her back ( Song of Solomon 6:13 a) and the king shows forth his jealousy for the first time with a mild rebuke to them ( Song of Solomon 6:13 b).

In Song of Solomon 7:1-13 we have a description of the husband and wife coming together in the intimacy of the marriage bed. The man is first aroused by her physical beauty and uses his words in foreplay ( Song of Solomon 7:1-5). He then moves into the act of intercourse ( Song of Solomon 7:6-9). The wife responds with words expressing her desire to always yield to him as long as he continues his devotion to her ( Song of Solomon 7:10 to Song of Solomon 8:4). This is the place of rest that the wife has been seeking in marriage, which is intimacy with her husband.

Figurative Interpretation - Figuratively speaking, this fourth song represents man's discipline to persevere in divine service. The intimacy of the marriage bed is where the wife finds rest as she yields herself totally to her husband. This is figurative of the believer yielding himself entirely to God's plan and purpose for humanity.

A good example of this phase of loving God with all of our heart is seen in the life of Kathryn Kuhlman in her later years of ministry, whose healing minister touched the world during 1960's and 70's. Her services were marked by the distinct presence of the Holy Spirit, being manifested by divine healings, people shaking and being slain with the Holy Spirit. She tells of the heavy price she paid to have this anointing, which involved leaving an unscriptural marriage with a man she dearly loved. She came to a place and time when she died to her own will and yielded totally to the will of God. Her "thorn in the flesh" was carrying the pain of walking away from an earthly love affair in order to be in God's perfect will. 201] She said, "Any of you ministers can have what I have if you'll only pay the price." She described the price that she paid as costing her everything. She said about a lifestyle of prayer, "If you find the power, you'll find heaven's treasure." 202] She refers to the day when she made a decision to divorce a man who has been previously married. She explains how on that day Katherine died. 203] Another good example is seen in the early years of Arthur Blessitt's call to take the cross around the world. In Central America a group of military police pulled him out of his mobile trailer and stood him up in front of a firing squad. Instead of pleading for his life, he reached into his trailer get these men some bibles. When he turned around to face the firing squad, everyone was on the ground. The power of God manifested and knocked everyone down. The point is that Arthur Blessitt no longer cared for his own life, but rather, his concern was to carry the testimony of Jesus Christ. 204]

201] Benny Hinn, The Anointing (Nashville, Tennessee: Thomas Nelson Publishers, 1992), 63-4.

202] Kathryn Kuhlman, "I Believe in Miracles," on This is Your Day (Irving, Texas), on Trinity Broadcasting Network (Santa Ana, California, 28 January 2008), television program.

203] Kathryn Kuhlman, "I Believe in Miracles," on This is Your Day (Irving, Texas), on Trinity Broadcasting Network (Santa Ana, California, 28 January 2008), television program; Benny Hinn, The Anointing (Nashville, Tennessee: Thomas Nelson Publishers, 1992), 63-4.

204] Arthur Blessitt, interviewed by Matthew Crouch, Behind the Scenes, on Trinity Broadcasting Network (Santa Ana, California, 2008), television program.

Outline- Note the proposed outline of this section:

1. Scene 1 - Love Is Tested Again — Song of Solomon 5:2 to Song of Solomon 6:13

a) The Duties of Marriage — — Song of Solomon 5:2-8

b) Becoming Familiar with One Another — Song of Solomon 5:9 to Song of Solomon 6:13

i) The Uniqueness of the Husband — Song of Solomon 5:9-16

ii) The Beloved's Commitment to Her Husband — Song of Solomon 6:1-3

iii) The Uniqueness of the Wife — Song of Solomon 6:4-10

iv) The Wife's Desire to Return Home — Song of Solomon 6:11-13

2. Scene 2 - The Intimacy of the Marriage Bed — Song of Solomon 7:1 to Song of Solomon 8:4

a) The Man's Foreplay — Song of Solomon 7:1-5

b) The Act of Intercourse — Song of Solomon 7:6-9

c) The Woman's Response to His Intimacy — Song of Solomon 7:10 to Song of Solomon 8:4


Verses 2-8

The Duties of Marriage: Learning to Abandon Self-will - Literal Interpretation- The new bride still does not find perfect rest, for in Song of Solomon 5:2-8 she experiences the new duties of a wife in which she has to now learn to deny herself and respond to her husband. After the wedding is consummated ( Song of Solomon 4:16 to Song of Solomon 5:1), the Beloved finds herself settled into her bed in a place of perfect rest and contentment, a place she does not want to abandon. Song of Solomon , when the Lover calls his beloved in the early hours of the morning, before the dew has vanished, to leave her place of rest and open up and follow him ( Song of Solomon 5:2), she becomes aware of her own comfort ( Song of Solomon 5:3). She does not want to leave this place of perfect rest at first and become defiled with the world again. But she will soon find that in apathy to this call, her bed is no longer a place of rest, for her lover is now gone. She will now have to learn that abiding rest is not found in a particular event or place, but in a willingness to yield to her lover under any circumstance. When she finally responded to his call and opened to him, he had vanished ( Song of Solomon 5:4-6). In her pursuit of her own will and desires, she lost fellowship and unity with her husband. Then, in her abandonment of her own comfort and rest, she sought him publicly and found persecution and pain ( Song of Solomon 5:7). However, in a step of greater maturity and demonstration of love, she told all who would hear about her desire to be with her lover ( Song of Solomon 5:8). Her lover had not truly abandoned her, but rather, needed her to demonstrate her sacrificial love for him: for mature love must first be demonstrated through sacrifice and abandonment of self. Thus, we see the painful process of growth in marriage as the couples begin to learn to yield to their own selfish will and come into unity each day for God's plan for their lives.

Note in this passage of Scripture that the husband never once changes in his feelings of love. But it is the wife who still experiences insecurities in their relationship. Thus, she has not yet entered into rest.

Figurative Interpretation- As this passage in Song of Solomon 5:2-8 relates to our spiritual growth, we find in the Christian life that our place of rest today is not necessarily our place of rest in the future. In other words, we may be called to serve in a place in the body of Christ for a while. But when the Lord deals with us to step out in faith and enter into a different place of ministry, it is often to leave this place of comfort. If we do not get up and move, we soon lose our sense of peace and feel restless.

One of the opening verses of Songs reads, "Draw me, we will run after thee." There are two occasions in Songs when the bride is drawn away by her Lover ( Song of Solomon 2:10; Song of Solomon 5:2). There are times in our spiritual growth when the Lord "draws us" out of one phase of ministry and into a higher level of sacrifice. Song of Solomon 5:2-8 describes just such a time when Christ calls a believer out of a place of rest.

Illustration- Kenneth Hagin tells the story of the time in his life when God called him out of the pastorate and into the field ministry as a teacher to the body of Christ. After years of preaching in small churches, he finally had a pastorate that paid him well, and his family was well taken care of. He had spent hours each that year praying in the Spirit, confessing Paul's prayers in Ephesians over his life and his congregation. It was a time in his life when he found temporary rest from the struggles of the ministry. Yet, this rest was not to last long. When he turned back from this call into the field ministry, his health failed and he almost died. Repenting of his attitude, he humbly accepted this divine call to travel and teach the body of Christ about walking by faith. However, it was a challenging time. He wept often when leaving his family and driving far from home. He struggled financially during those early years. Yet, he had made the decision to persevere in this phase of his ministry. 205]

205] Kenneth Hagin, The Spirit Upon and the Spirit Within (Tulsa, Oklahoma: Faith Library Publications, c 2003, 2006), 105-11.

Illustration- In John 21:15-19 Jesus reconciles Peter back into fellowship with Himself. Peter knew that he had behaved in an immature manner by denying the Lord three times. Song of Solomon , Jesus is telling him that one day Peter would grow up and give his life for Christ just as he had seen his Master giving His own life to the Father's will. Peter will mature in the faith. In Hebrews 5:11-14 Paul rebukes the Hebrews for not being more mature in their faith and lifestyle. As a father, I give my small children a lot of room to misbehave. But as a boss on my Job , I am much more restrictive to my employees, simply because I expect an adult to behave differently than my children. This is what Paul is telling his readers in Hebrews 5:11-14. As we grow in the Lord, our journey becomes more and more narrow. We are required to walk the straight and narrow path. Jesus told Peter, "When thou wast young, thou girdedst thyself, and walkedst whither thou wouldest: but when thou shalt be old, thou shalt stretch forth thy hands, and another shall gird thee, and carry thee whither thou wouldest not." ( John 21:18) In other words, when Peter was young, he could a lot of things that he wanted to do, but as he became old, he had to relinquish his will to others. His journey became straight and narrow. Church tradition tells us he was crucified upside down as a martyr for his Saviour. So it is in our Christian life as we mature in the Lord.

Song of Solomon 5:2 I sleep, but my heart waketh: it is the voice of my beloved that knocketh, saying, Open to me, my sister, my love, my dove, my undefiled: for my head is filled with dew, and my locks with the drops of the night.

Song of Solomon 5:2Word Study on "dove" - Strong says the Hebrew word "dove" "yownah" ( יוֹנָה) (H 3123) means, "dove." The Enhanced Strong says it is used 32times in the Old Testament, being translated in the KJV as "dove 21, pigeon 10, variant + 016861." It is used 6 times in the Song of Songs ( Song of Solomon 1:15; Song of Solomon 2:14; Song of Solomon 4:1; Song of Solomon 5:2; Song of Solomon 5:12; Song of Solomon 6:9). On three occasions it refers to the Shulamite, and on three occasions the lovers describe one another with dove's eyes.

Song of Solomon 5:2Literal Interpretation - "it is the voice of my beloved that knocketh, saying, Open to me, my sister, my love, my dove, my undefiled" - In Song of Solomon 5:2 the Lover knocks on the door of his beloved's home. "for my head is filled with dew, and my locks with the drops of the night" - Where has the Lover been so that his head is filled with dew? This description indicates that he had been in the garden that night, which is where she will find him in Song of Solomon 6:2. If we look at Song of Solomon 2:16-17 and Song of Solomon 6:2-3 we can conclude that he has been feeding among the lilies in his garden until daybreak.

Song of Solomon 2:16-17, "My beloved is mine, and I am his: he feedeth among the lilies. Until the day break, and the shadows flee away, turn, my beloved, and be thou like a roe or a young hart upon the mountains of Bether."

Song of Solomon 6:2-3, "My beloved is gone down into his garden, to the beds of spices, to feed in the gardens, and to gather lilies. I am my beloved"s, and my beloved is mine: he feedeth among the lilies."

Figurative Interpretation - Song of Solomon 5:2 suggests that the Holy Spirit comes again and asks for us to fellowship with Him. It is the Lord drawing us with cords of love to a deeper walk of communion. "I sleep, but my heart waketh" - Watchman Nee interprets this phrase to mean that the believer is at rest in his relationship with Christ, but his heart is alert. 206] The heart is often used figuratively to refer to the spirit of man ( Romans 2:29). However, the context suggests that as this person sleeps, his heart is awakened by the Spirit of God drawing him out of rest and into a deeper walk of communion with Christ. "it is the voice of my beloved that knocketh" - The Holy Spirit speaks to our spirits, not to our minds. Jesus knocks upon the door of our hearts for communion,"Behold, I stand at the door, and knock: if any man hear my voice, and open the door, I will come in to him, and will sup with him, and he with me." ( Revelation 3:20) "saying, Open to me, my sister, my love, my dove, my undefiled" - He asks her to open her heart to a deeper commitment of devotion to Christ (Mike Bickle). 207] He calls her "my sister" to acknowledge their union as one, equal in this union. He calls her "my love" to acknowledge the power that binds them in covenant, and her free will to accept this love. He calls her "my dove" to acknowledge her regenerated spirit in Christ. He calls her "my undefiled" to acknowledge her purity before God. "for my head is filled with dew, and my locks with the drops of the night" - Bickle suggests the description of Christ with dew upon his head reflects His time of agony in the Garden of Gethsemane. 208] Jesus made a great sacrifice to be able to come and commune with a child of God. The Lord is calling this child of God out of this position of rest and into a deeper walk that involves sacrifice and shame, which will take place in Song of Solomon 5:7 when the beloved is wounded by the watchmen, and her veil is taken away in shame. However, I believe the dew represents the manifest anointing that comes from spending time in God's presence. This anointing comes and goes in a believer's life. It comes when retreating into the presence of God, and it retreats as one engages in the affairs and toils of this life. Christ is calling us to make a sacrifice and come apart with Him for a season of refreshment in the presence of God.

206] Watchman Nee, Song of Songs (Fort Washington, Pennsylvania: CLC Publications, c 1965, 2001), 97-8.

207] Mike Bickle, Session 13 - The Ultimate 2-Fold Test of Maturity ( Song of Solomon 5:1-8), in Song of Songs (Kansas City, Missouri: International House of Prayer, 1998), 3.

208] Mike Bickle, Session 13 - The Ultimate 2-Fold Test of Maturity ( Song of Solomon 5:1-8), in Song of Songs (Kansas City, Missouri: International House of Prayer, 1998), 1-2.

Song of Solomon 5:3 I have put off my coat; how shall I put it on? I have washed my feet; how shall I defile them?

Song of Solomon 5:3Literal Interpretation - The Shulamite bride seems to be saying that she has already entered a place of rest and is unwilling to get up and toil anew. The new bride has found her place of rest in the marriage bed and does not want leave it. Now, she quickly learns that there are new duties and responsibilities in the bond of marriage. She must rise to those duties when she does not want to rise. She must learn to abandon her will and pursue unity in this marriage. Her love is still strong for him, but her self-centered life as a single person is over and she must go through the pain of learning to abandon her desires and please her husband.

She thought that she would find rest in the time of courtship, but only found herself lovesick. She then thought that rest would be found in the engagement, but she suffered the pain of being separated from him. She then thought that marriage would bring her into rest, but in Song of Solomon 5:2-8 she will find out that rest is not obtained through marriage alone. There is something else need, which will be dying to one's own will.

Figurative Interpretation- Song of Solomon 5:2 suggests that the Holy Spirit's request for fellowship is met with man's fleshly struggle to satisfy his physical desires, rather than yield to the Holy Spirit.

Song of Solomon 5:4 My beloved put in his hand by the hole of the door, and my bowels were moved for him.

Song of Solomon 5:4Figurative Interpretation - Although a believer's body cries for physical rest and comfort, his heart yearns to follow the Lord. She chooses to follow her heart in the next verse.

Song of Solomon 5:5 I rose up to open to my beloved; and my hands dropped with myrrh, and my fingers with sweet smelling myrrh, upon the handles of the lock.

Song of Solomon 5:5Today a lady rubs moisturizing lotion on her hands to keep them soft and fragrant. This appears to be what the Beloved is referring to when she says that her hands dropped with myrrh and her fingers with sweet smelling myrrh. Myrrh is the symbol of sacrifice. Song of Solomon 5:5 suggests that this door she is about to walk through is one of sacrifice and suffering.

Song of Solomon 5:6 I opened to my beloved; but my beloved had withdrawn himself, and was gone: my soul failed when he spake: I sought him, but I could not find him; I called him, but he gave me no answer.

Song of Solomon 5:6Figurative Interpretation- Song of Solomon 5:6 symbolizes the times when God tests our love and devotion for Him. As an ordained time in our spiritual journey, the Lord requires us to mature further by prompting us to seek Him and serve Him without the previous sense of his close presence. Mike Bickle suggests this verse means Jesus "withdraws His manifest presence" in order to test a believer's faith. 209] Very often before a time of trial, God will intervene in our lives in a special way to let us know that He is near. Such divine visitations are what give us the strength to endure the upcoming trials when it seems his presence is not there to deliver us from our discomforts. These trials are used to reveal our true devotion to our Saviour.

209] Mike Bickle, Session 13 - The Ultimate 2-Fold Test of Maturity ( Song of Solomon 5:1-8), in Song of Songs (Kansas City, Missouri: International House of Prayer, 1998), 12.

Song of Solomon 5:7 The watchmen that went about the city found me, they smote me, they wounded me; the keepers of the walls took away my veil from me.

Song of Solomon 5:7Word Study on "the walls"- Strong says the Hebrew word "walls" "chowmah" ( חֹומָה) (H 2346) means, "a wall of protection," and comes from an unused root that probably meant "to join." The Enhanced Strong says it is used 133times in the Old Testament, being translated in the KJV as "wall 131, walled 2." It is used 3times in the Song of Songs ( Song of Solomon 5:7; Song of Solomon 8:9-10).

Song of Solomon 5:7Literal Interpretation - These watchmen of the city thought they were doing their king service by punishing this Shulamite they found wandering in the dark streets of the city. They believed she was out of order for being awake at night, rather than sleeping. Instead, they were abusing the king's chosen one.

Figurative Interpretation- God has set watchmen over Israel and the Church to guide the people. When God's chosen behave differently than other believers, it often disturbs church leaders. They do not understand why some individuals do not follow their traditions. They sometimes persecute such believers, thinking they are doing God a service.

Every person must encounter the Lord for himself, and not become dependent upon the Jewish priests and Church leaders for total guidance. Only those who passionately desire the Lord will look beyond the priesthood and Church leaders to find a personal encounter with Christ. For example under the Old covenant, a Jew had to look beyond the instructions of the Law and understand its original purpose was to bring a man to the Lord. Paul said in Galatians that the Law was given to the Jews as a way of guiding them to Christ. The Shulamite encountered these watchmen earlier in Song of Solomon 3:3, but they did not harm her. The fact that they were antagonistic with this second encounter with the Beloved means that after the Resurrection of Christ the Law was no longer man's instructor, and those who still clung to the Law also persecuted those who accepted Christ as the fulfillment of this very Law. God calls us beyond our church traditions. Perhaps the taking away of her veil symbolizes how a believer must be willing to lose his dignity over pursuing Christ Jesus.

Mike Bickle suggests Song of Solomon 5:7 means that Church leaders have been allowed to persecute this child of God as a part of his trial of faith. 210] Watchman Nee interprets Song of Solomon 5:7 to symbolize the stage of Christian growth in which a child of God allows himself to take up the afflictions of the Cross. 211] Paul describes this part of our Christian journey in Colossians 1:24, "Who now rejoice in my sufferings for you, and fill up that which is behind of the afflictions of Christ in my flesh for his body"s sake, which is the church:" As we seek the Lord and His ways, the world rejects us and persecutes us.

210] Mike Bickle, Session 13 - The Ultimate 2-Fold Test of Maturity ( Song of Solomon 5:1-8), in Song of Songs (Kansas City, Missouri: International House of Prayer, 1998), 14-6.

211] Watchman Nee, Song of Songs (Fort Washington, Pennsylvania: CLC Publications, c 1965, 2001), 107-8.

Song of Solomon 5:6-7Comments- The Beloved's Search for Her Lover- In Song of Solomon 1:7 the Shulamite woman was searching for her Lover. She will search for him a number of times in this Song. The purpose of each search is to find rest. She will look for him during the phase of Courtship in Song of Solomon 1:7. She will look for him again during the phase of Engagement in Song of Solomon 3:1-4. She will search for him during the Wedding phase in Song of Solomon 5:6-7. Finally, during the stage of a Maturing Marriage she learns his ways and becomes confident in his devotion towards her ( Song of Solomon 6:1-3).

Song of Solomon 5:8 I charge you, O daughters of Jerusalem, if ye find my beloved, that ye tell him, that I am sick of love.

Song of Solomon 5:8Word Study on "love" - Strong says the Hebrew word "love" "ahabah" ( אַהֲבָה) (H 160), means, "love." The Enhanced Strong says this word is used forty (40) times in the Old Testament, being translated in the KJV as "love 40." It is found 11times in the Song of Solomon ( Song of Solomon 2:4-5; Song of Solomon 2:7; Song of Solomon 3:5; Song of Solomon 3:10; Song of Solomon 5:8; Song of Solomon 7:6; Song of Solomon 8:4; Song of Solomon 8:6-7[twice]), with one of these uses as a substantive to refer to her lover ( Song of Solomon 7:6).

Song of Solomon 5:8Figurative Interpretation - Mike Bickle suggests that Song of Solomon 5:8 symbolizes a humble respond in "love and humility." 212]

212] Mike Bickle, Session 13 - The Ultimate 2-Fold Test of Maturity ( Song of Solomon 5:1-8), in Song of Songs (Kansas City, Missouri: International House of Prayer, 1998), 1.


Verses 9-13

Becoming Familiar with One Another - In Song of Solomon 5:9 to Song of Solomon 6:13 the husband and wife become familiar with one another's characteristics. This passage is important for a maturing marriage in that the spouses focus on the positive unique attributes of one another, rather than on the negative.

In Song of Solomon 5:9 to Song of Solomon 6:3 we have symbolic language that suggests that the wife has become familiar with her husband. We have the daughters of Jerusalem asking questions to the beloved about her lover and husband. They first ask her why he is more special than other men ( Song of Solomon 5:9) and she responds by describing his unique characteristics ( Song of Solomon 5:10-16). This symbolizes the journey of every wife to learn about her husband and to admire his unique characteristics. The daughters of Jerusalem then ask the wife about the ways and lifestyle and interests of her husband ( Song of Solomon 6:1). She answers by describing the things that he does ( Song of Solomon 6:2-3), which symbolizes her journey of becoming familiar with her husband's desires and activities.


Verses 9-16

The Uniqueness of the Husband in the Eyes of His Wife - In Song of Solomon 5:9-16 the Shulamite praises her Lover for his beauty. It is important to note that while the Lover praises her beauty by speaking directly to her, she praises his beauty by addressing the daughters of Jerusalem. This suggests that while Christ's words of liquid love are poured forth into our hearts during communion, the believer responds by pouring God's love upon others as a testimony of His love for us.

The daughters of Jerusalem first ask her why he is more special than other men ( Song of Solomon 5:9) and she responds by describing his unique characteristics ( Song of Solomon 5:10-16). She begins with the head and moves down the body to the legs. She emphasizes the fact that he is unique among men in his appearance.

Song of Solomon 5:10 - It is very easy to see that each of these phrases describes an aspect of Jesus Christ's divine nature. For example, the phrase "My beloved is white and ruddy, the chiefest among ten thousand" ( Song of Solomon 5:10) would represent His righteousness as well as His humanity. White symbolizes righteousness, while ruddy represents humanity. There is none other among men who stands in this position of righteousness with God the Father as does Jesus Christ His Son.

Song of Solomon 5:11 - The phrase "His head is as the most fine gold" ( Song of Solomon 5:11) would represent the Son's divinity and Godhead over all of creation. The phrase "his locks are bushy, and black as a raven" ( Song of Solomon 5:11) may suggest eternal youth and strength.

Song of Solomon 5:12 - The phrase "His eyes are as the eyes of doves by the rivers of waters" ( Song of Solomon 5:12) would represent the fact that He has been given the Spirit without measure ( John 3:34), like rivers of water. In addition, it is by the outpouring of the Spirit that love flows into and through one's life ( Romans 5:5). I read one description of the Lord Jesus by someone who had received a divine visitation from the Lord. This person said that His eyes were like liquid love as Jesus looked at him. We know in Scripture that the eyes often are symbolic of the heart, or spirit, of a man (see Matthew 6:22). His eyes may also represent His infinite understanding and knowledge of all things.

John 3:34, "For he whom God hath sent speaketh the words of God: for God giveth not the Spirit by measure unto him."

Romans 5:5, "And hope maketh not ashamed; because the love of God is shed abroad in our hearts by the Holy Ghost which is given unto us."

Song of Solomon 5:13 - The phrase "His cheeks are as a bed of spices, as sweet flowers: his lips like lilies, dropping sweet smelling myrrh," ( Song of Solomon 5:13) may refer to His glory and majesty and anointing. For Jesus tells us in Matthew 6:29 that God has arrayed flowers with glory.

Song of Solomon 5:14 - The phrase "His hands are as gold rings set with the beryl," ( Song of Solomon 5:14) may refer to His omnipotence and almighty power: for the Scriptures refer to God's power as the work of His hands. The phrase "his belly is as bright ivory overlaid with sapphires" ( Song of Solomon 5:14) may refer to God's compassion for mankind: for the belly represents the seat of emotions. We can compare the phrase "bowels of compassion" used in 1 John 3:17. In Genesis 43:30 we have a description of Joseph's emotions, "And Joseph made haste; for his bowels did yearn upon his brother". In 1 Kings 3:26, "for her bowels yearned upon her son." In Isaiah 63:15, "the sounding of thy bowels and of thy mercies toward me." In Jeremiah 4:19, "My bowels, my bowels! I am pained at my very heart." In Jeremiah 31:20, "my bowels are troubled for him." In Philippians 1:8, "For God is my record, how greatly I long after you all in the bowels of Jesus Christ." In Philippians 2:1, "if any bowels and mercies." His nature is a God of compassion and of tender mercy, who forgives our sins.

Song of Solomon 5:15 - The phrase "His legs are as pillars of marble, set upon sockets of fine gold" ( Song of Solomon 5:15) may refer to His unchanging nature. The Scriptures tell us, "I am the Lord and I change not," ( Malachi 3:6), and "the Father of lights, with whom is no variableness, neither shadow of turning," ( James 1:17). His purpose and plan of redemption is being established upon this earth and cannot be altered by man.

The phrase "his countenance is as Lebanon, excellent as the cedars" ( Song of Solomon 5:15) refers to His exalted position above all nature.

Song of Solomon 5:16 - The phrase "His mouth is most sweet: yea, he is altogether lovely," ( Song of Solomon 5:16) sums up His divine nature in relation to mankind as being a good God, a God who gives His people good things when they serve Him.

Song of Solomon 5:9 What is thy beloved more than another beloved, O thou fairest among women? what is thy beloved more than another beloved, that thou dost so charge us?

Song of Solomon 5:9Figurative Interpretation- The average Christian does not understand such a close relationship with God. However, her prayer is being answered as "spices flow from her garden" as a sweet fragrance of Christ that others may see. This sweet aroma did not flow out until the winds of adversity blew upon her garden. Her love and devotion for her Lover in the midst of hardships has captured their attention.

1 Corinthians 1:3-7 gives us a brief summary of the contents of the epistle of 2Corinthians. Paul says that the sufferings that he endured were for their sake that they might be comforted during their tribulations. One great illustration of this theme was stated by Juanita Bynum. In the early 1990's she was at a point of feeling worthless after having gone through many trials, including a divorce. When she laid her heart open to the Lord, He replied by telling her that she was now a "weapon of power." The Lord began to explain that the power in a gun does not lie in its size or in its shape; but, it lies in the bullet that is powered by the gunpowder packed inside a small primer. This powder had to first be crushed and ground into a powder in order to become useful. But still, it could be blown away with the slightest breath. However, when this gunpowder is pressed inside a cap and placed inside the gun, it becomes a powerful weapon. In the same way, God has to crush us and then Revelation -mould our hearts like gun powder being packed into a primer in order for our lives to become useful to Him. At this point, our testimonies become like a bullet in a gun. When it goes forth, it becomes a powerful weapon of power able to transform many lives. 213]

213] Juanita Bynum, Weapons of Power, on Trinity Broadcasting Network (Santa Ana, California, 16 June 2004), television program.

Song of Solomon 5:10 My beloved is white and ruddy, the chiefest among ten thousand.

Song of Solomon 5:10Word Study on "ruddy" - Strong says the Hebrew word "ruddy" "adom" ( אָדֹם) (H 122) means, "rosy, red, ruddy." It is derived from the same primitive root from which we get the name "Adam," or "man." ( אָדַם) (H 120) The Enhanced Strong says this word is used 8 times in the Old Testament, being translated in the KJV as "red 8, ruddy 1."

Song of Solomon 5:10Word Study on "the chiefest" - Gesenius says the Hebrew word "chiefest" "dagal" ( דָּגַל) (H 1713) literally means, "to cover, to cover over," thus, "to act covertly, to deceive." He says the passive participle in Song of Solomon 5:10 means, "erect as a banner, conspicuous, distinguished," and the Niphal in Song of Solomon 6:4; Song of Solomon 6:10 means, "to be furnished, or arrayed, with banners." Strong says it is a primitive root literally meaning, "to flaunt, i.e. to raise a flag," and figuratively, "to be conspicuous." The Enhanced Strong says this word is used 4times in the Old Testament, being translated in the KJV as "(set up) banner 3, chiefest 1."

Psalm 20:5, "We will rejoice in thy salvation, and in the name of our God we will set up our banners: the LORD fulfil all thy petitions."

Song of Solomon 5:10, "My beloved is white and ruddy, the chiefest among ten thousand."

Song of Solomon 6:4, "Thou art beautiful, O my love, as Tirzah, comely as Jerusalem, terrible as an army with banners."

Song of Solomon 6:10, "Who is she that looketh forth as the morning, fair as the moon, clear as the sun, and terrible as an army with banners?"

Comments- This Hebrew word is used in the phrase "terrible as an army with banners" in Song of Solomon 6:4; Song of Solomon 6:10, which Gesenius translates, "terrible as furnished with banners," i.e, as hosts or a camp of soldiers. He explains that the Shulamite woman is described as conquering and captivating the hearts of all.

Song of Solomon 5:10Word Study on "ten thousand" - Strong says the Hebrew word "reb-aw-baw"" ( רְבָבָה) (7233) means, "abundance (in number), i.e. myriad," and it comes from the primitive root ( רָבַב) (H 7231), which means, "to increase, especially in number, to multiply by a myriad." The Enhanced Strong says this word is used 16 times in the Old Testament, being translated in the KJV as "ten thousand 13, million 1, many 1, multiply." Gesenius tells us this Hebrew word is commonly used of any large number.

Song of Solomon 5:10Literal Interpretation- Song of Solomon 5:10 may serve as a general description of the Lover, followed by particular aspects of his beauty, much like the Lover opens his love song by summarizing her beauty in Song of Solomon 4:1 before describing the details. She closes this love song with another summary of his beauty in Song of Solomon 5:16. This description reminds us of young David in 1 Samuel 16:12; 1 Samuel 17:42.

1 Samuel 16:12, "And he sent, and brought him in. Now he was ruddy, and withal of a beautiful countenance, and goodly to look to. And the LORD said, Arise, anoint him: for this is he."

1 Samuel 17:42, "And when the Philistine looked about, and saw David, he disdained him: for he was but a youth, and ruddy, and of a fair countenance."

Figurative Interpretation - Watchman Nee suggests that his radiance reflects Christ's divine countenance. His ruddy complexion reflects his human countenance, which is the reflection of perfect heath. As "the chiefest among ten thousand," Christ is the one to whom we must look for redemption. 214] No other man could do what Christ accomplished on Calvary. Bickle suggests Song of Solomon 5:10 is a general statement of His beauty. 215] We see a similar general description in the Lover's opening statement of his beloved in Song of Solomon 4:1.

214] Watchman Nee, Song of Songs (Fort Washington, Pennsylvania: CLC Publications, c 1965, 2001), 110-1.

215] Mike Bickle, Session 14 - The Bride's Response to the 2-Fold Test ( Song of Solomon 5:9-6:5), in Song of Songs (Kansas City, Missouri: International House of Prayer, 1998), 1.

Song of Solomon 5:11 His head is as the most fine gold, his locks are bushy, and black as a raven.

Song of Solomon 5:11Figurative Interpretation - Watchman Nee suggests that the head of gold reflects Christ's divinity. 216] He is the head over all creation. The thick, black hair reflects his eternal vigor and strength. If we use the story of Absalom long, black hair, it may symbolize Christ's beauty. Nee suggests that gray hair would be a sign of age and frailty.

216] Watchman Nee, Song of Songs (Fort Washington, Pennsylvania: CLC Publications, c 1965, 2001), 111.

2 Samuel 14:25-26, "But in all Israel there was none to be so much praised as Absalom for his beauty: from the sole of his foot even to the crown of his head there was no blemish in him. And when he polled his head, (for it was at every year"s end that he polled it: because the hair was heavy on him, therefore he polled it:) he weighed the hair of his head at two hundred shekels after the king"s weight."

Song of Solomon 5:12 His eyes are as the eyes of doves by the rivers of waters, washed with milk, and fitly set.

Song of Solomon 5:12Word Study on "doves" - Strong says the Hebrew word "dove" "yownah" ( יוֹנָה) (H 3123) means, "dove." The Enhanced Strong says it is used 32times in the Old Testament, being translated in the KJV as "dove 21, pigeon 10, variant + 016861." It is used 6 times in the Song of Songs ( Song of Solomon 1:15; Song of Solomon 2:14; Song of Solomon 4:1; Song of Solomon 5:2; Song of Solomon 5:12; Song of Solomon 6:9). On three occasions it refers to the Shulamite, and on three occasions the lovers describe one another with dove's eyes.

Song of Solomon 5:13 His cheeks are as a bed of spices, as sweet flowers: his lips like lilies, dropping sweet smelling myrrh.

Song of Solomon 5:13Word Study on "spices" - Strong says the Hebrew word "spices" "besem" ( בֶּשֶׂם) or "bôsem" ( בֹּשֶׂם) (H 1314) means, "fragrance, spicery, the balsam plant." The Enhanced Strong says it is used 29 times in the Old Testament, being translated in the KJV as "spice 24, sweet odours 2, sweet 2, sweet smell 1." This word is used six times in the Song of Solomon ( Song of Solomon 4:10; Song of Solomon 4:14; Song of Solomon 4:16; Song of Solomon 5:13; Song of Solomon 6:2; Song of Solomon 8:14).

Song of Solomon 5:13Word Study on "lilies" - Strong says the Hebrew word "lily" "shuwshan" ( שׁוּשַׁן) (H 7799) means, "a lily (from its whiteness), as a flower or [archaic] an ornament." The Enhanced Strong says this word is used 15 times in the Old Testament, being translated in the KJV as "lily 13, Shoshannim 2." However, its compound uses in Psalm 60 (Shushan-eduth) and Psalm 80 (Shoshannim-Eduth) can be included. It is found 8 times in Songs ( Song of Solomon 2:1-2; Song of Solomon 2:16; Song of Solomon 4:5; Song of Solomon 5:13; Song of Solomon 6:2-3; Song of Solomon 7:2). Lilies were used to adorn Solomon's Temple ( 1 Kings 7:19; 1 Kings 7:22; 1 Kings 7:26, 2 Chronicles 4:5). This word or its derivatives are used in the title of four psalms as "Shoshannim" ( Psalm 45, 60, 69, 80). Psalm 45 is a song of love, where a wedding processional is described. In Songs the Beloved is describes as "a lily of the valley," and "a lily among thorns" ( Song of Solomon 2:1-2). The Lover feeds among the lilies in the garden ( Song of Solomon 2:16; Song of Solomon 4:5; Song of Solomon 6:3), and gathers lilies ( Song of Solomon 5:13). Hosea describes the children of Israel as a lily, saying, "I will be as the dew unto Israel: he shall grow as the lily, and cast forth his roots as Lebanon." ( Hosea 14:5) Watchman Nee suggests that the lilies in Songs is symbolic of those who are upright before God. 217]

217] Watchman Nee, Song of Songs (Fort Washington, Pennsylvania: CLC Publications, c 1965, 2001), 53.

Song of Solomon 5:14 His hands are as gold rings set with the beryl: his belly is as bright ivory overlaid with sapphires.

Song of Solomon 5:15 His legs are as pillars of marble, set upon sockets of fine gold: his countenance is as Lebanon, excellent as the cedars.

Song of Solomon 5:16 His mouth is most sweet: yea, he is altogether lovely. This is my beloved, and this is my friend, O daughters of Jerusalem.

Song of Solomon 5:16 — "yea, he is altogether lovely" - Comments- This phrase is a closing summary of her Lover's beauty.

 


Copyright Statement
These files are copyrighted by the author, Gary Everett. Used by Permission.
No distribution beyond personal use without permission.

Bibliography Information
Everett, Gary H. "Commentary on Song of Solomon 5:4". Gary H. Everett's Study Notes on the Holy Scriptures. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ghe/song-of-solomon-5.html. 2013.

Lectionary Calendar
Wednesday, May 22nd, 2019
the Fifth Week after Easter
ADVERTISEMENT
Commentary Navigator
Search This Commentary
Enter query in the box below
ADVERTISEMENT
To report dead links, typos, or html errors or suggestions about making these resources more useful use our convenient contact form
Powered by Lightspeed Technology