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Bible Commentaries

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible
Judges 5

 

 

Verse 1

Judges 5:1-31. Deborah and Barak‘s song of thanksgiving.

Then sang Deborah and Barak … on that day — This noble triumphal ode was evidently the composition of Deborah herself.


Verse 2-3

The meaning is obscurely seen in our version; it has been better rendered thus, “Praise ye Jehovah; for the free are freed in Israel - the people have willingly offered themselves” [Robinson].


Verse 4-5

Allusion is here made, in general terms, to God‘s interposition on behalf of His people.

Seir … the field of Edom — represent the mountain range and plain extending along the south from the Dead Sea to the Elanitic Gulf.

thou wentest out — indicates the storm to have proceeded from the south or southeast.


Verses 6-8

The song proceeds in these verses to describe the sad condition of the country, the oppression of the people, and the origin of all the national distress in the people‘s apostasy from God. Idolatry was the cause of foreign invasion and internal inability to resist it.


Verse 9

expresses gratitude to the respective leaders of the tribes which participated in the contest; but, above all, to God, who inspired both the patriotic disposition and the strength.


Verse 10

Speak — that is, join in this song of praise.

white asses — Those which are purely white are highly prized, and being costly, are possessed only by the wealthy and great.

Ye that sit in judgment — has been rendered, “ye that repose on tapestries.”


Verses 11-14

The wells which are at a little distance from towns in the East, are, in unsettled times, places of danger. But in peace they are scenes of pleasant and joyous resort. The poetess anticipates that this song may be sung, and the righteous acts of the Lord rehearsed at these now tranquil “places of drawing water.” Deborah now rouses herself to describe, in terms suitable to the occasion, the preparation and the contest, and calls in a flight of poetic enthusiasm on Barak to parade his prisoners in triumphal procession. Then follows a eulogistic enumeration of the tribes which raised the commanded levy, or volunteered their services - the soldiers of Ephraim who dwelt near the mount of the Amalekites, the small quota of Benjamin; “the governors,” valiant leaders “out of Machir,” the western Manasseh; out of Zebulun.


Verse 15

Then comes a reproachful notice of the tribes which did not obey the summons to take the field against the common enemy of Israel. By the

divisions — that is, the watercourses which descend from the eastern hills unto the Jordan and Dead Sea.

For the divisions of Reuben there were great thoughts of heart — They felt the patriotic impulse and determined, at first, to join the ranks of their western brethren, but resiled from the purpose, preferring their peaceful shepherd songs to the trumpet sound of war.


Verse 17-18

Gilead abode beyond Jordan — that is, Both Gad and the eastern half to Manasseh chose to dwell at ease in their Havoth-jair, or “villages of tents,” while Dan and Asher, both maritime tribes, continued with their ships and in their “breaches” (“havens”). The mention of these craven tribes (Judges 5:18) is concluded with a fresh burst of commendation on Zebulun and Naphtali.


Verses 19-22

describes the scene of battle and the issue. It would seem (Judges 5:19) that Jabin was reinforced by the troops of other Canaanite princes. The battlefield was near Taanach (now Ta‘annuk), on a tell or mound in the level plain of Megiddo (now Leijun), on its southwestern extremity, by the left bank of the Kishon.

they took no gain of money — They obtained no plunder.


Verse 20

the stars in their courses fought — A fearful tempest burst upon them and threw them into disorder.


Verse 21

the river of Kishon swept them away — The enemy was defeated near “the waters of Megiddo” - the sources and side streams of the Kishon: they that fled had to cross the deep and marshy bed of the torrent, but the Lord had sent a heavy rain - the waters suddenly rose - the warriors fell into the quicksands, and sinking deep into them, were drowned or washed into the sea [Van De Velde].


Verse 22

Then were the horse hoofs broken by the means of the prancings — Anciently, as in many parts of the East still, horses were not shod. The breaking of the hoofs denotes the hot haste and heavy irregular tramp of the routed foe.


Verse 23

Curse ye Meroz — a village on the confines of Issachar and Naphtali, which lay in the course of the fugitives, but the inhabitants declined to aid in their destruction.


Verses 24-27

is a most graphic picture of the treatment of Sisera in the tent of Jael.


Verse 25

butter — curdled milk; a favorite beverage in the East.


Verses 28-30

In these verses a sudden transition is made to the mother of the Canaanite general, and a striking picture is drawn of a mind agitated between hope and fear - impatient of delay, yet anticipating the news of victory and the rewards of rich booty.

the lattice — a lattice window, common to the houses in warm countries for the circulation of air.


Verse 29

her wise ladies — maids of honor.


Verse 30

to every man a damsel or two — Young maidens formed always a valued part of Oriental conquerors‘ war-spoils. But Sisera‘s mother wished other booty for him; namely, the gold-threaded, richly embroidered, and scarlet-colored cloaks which were held in such high esteem. The ode concludes with a wish in keeping with the pious and patriotic character of the prophetess.

 


Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Judges 5:4". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/judges-5.html. 1871-8.

Lectionary Calendar
Wednesday, December 11th, 2019
the Second Week of Advent
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