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Bible Commentaries

Arthur Peake's Commentary on the Bible
Job 25

 

 

Introduction

Job 25-27. offer a difficult critical problem. "The phenomena which excite attention are these: (a) Bildad's speech is unusually short; (b) Job's reply contains a section (Job 26:5-14) very like Bildad's speech; (c) Zophar fails to speak; (d) ch. 27 has a title prefixed, which has no real parallel elsewhere in the middle of a speech belonging to the original poem (ch. 29 forming no real exception); (e) the greater part of ch. 27 so completely contradicts Job's views as elsewhere expressed, that it seems very hard to believe that it can have formed part of this speech" (Peake).

Here what is a very usual rearrangement will be adopted. We shall take Job 25 and Job 26:5-14 as Bildad's speech, Job 26:1-4 and Job 27:2-6 as Job's reply, and Job 27:7-23 as the missing third speech of Zophar. This seems the simplest arrangement, though it is open to objections. For this and alternative views, see Peake's Commentary.


Verses 1-6

Job 25-27. offer a difficult critical problem. "The phenomena which excite attention are these: (a) Bildad's speech is unusually short; (b) Job's reply contains a section (Job 26:5-14) very like Bildad's speech; (c) Zophar fails to speak; (d) ch. 27 has a title prefixed, which has no real parallel elsewhere in the middle of a speech belonging to the original poem (ch. 29 forming no real exception); (e) the greater part of ch. 27 so completely contradicts Job's views as elsewhere expressed, that it seems very hard to believe that it can have formed part of this speech" (Peake).

Here what is a very usual rearrangement will be adopted. We shall take Job 25 and Job 26:5-14 as Bildad's speech, Job 26:1-4 and Job 27:2-6 as Job's reply, and Job 27:7-23 as the missing third speech of Zophar. This seems the simplest arrangement, though it is open to objections. For this and alternative views, see Peake's Commentary.

Job 25. Opening of Bildad's Third Speech.—Unable to reply to the facts of experience adduced by Job, he nevertheless makes his protest against his argument. Let the facts be what they will, God is great in power and man is unclean and sinful in his sight.

In 2 the reference is to battles of the angels, perhaps rebellions against God, who vanquishes the rebellious angels, as long ago He vanquished the chaos-monster Tiamat and her brood (Job 9:13, Job 26:12-13, Isaiah 51:9). With Job 25:4-6 cf. the words of Eliphaz, Job 41:7-21, Job 15:14-16.

 


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Bibliography Information
Peake, Arthur. "Commentary on Job 25:4". "Arthur Peake's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pfc/job-25.html. 1919.

Lectionary Calendar
Monday, December 9th, 2019
the Second Week of Advent
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