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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

1 Corinthians 11:26

For as often as you eat this bread and drink the cup, you proclaim the Lord's death until He comes.

Adam Clarke Commentary

Ye do show the Lord's death - As in the passover they showed forth the bondage they had been in, and the redemption they had received from it; so in the eucharist they showed forth the sacrificial death of Christ, and the redemption from sin derived from it.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 11:26". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/1-corinthians-11.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

For as often - Whenever you do this.

Ye eat this bread - This is a direct and positive refutation of the doctrine of the papists that the bread is changed into the real body of the Lord Jesus. Here it is expressly called “bread” - bread still - bread after the consecration. Before the Saviour instituted the ordinance he took “bread” - it was bread then: it was “bread” which he “blessed” and “broke;” and it was bread when it was given to them; and it was bread when Paul says here that they ate. How then can it be pretended that it is anything else but bread? And what an amazing and astonishing absurdity it is to believe that that bread is changed into the flesh and blood of Jesus Christ (transubstantiation or consubstantiation)!

Ye do show the Lord‘s death - You set forth, or exhibit in an impressive manner, the fact that he was put to death; you exhibit the emblems of his broken body and shed blood, and your belief of the fact that he died. This shows that the ordinance was to be so far public as to be a proper showing forth of their belief in the death of the Saviour. It should be public. It is one mode of professing attachment to the Redeemer; and its public observance often has a most impressive effect on those who witness its observance.

Till he come - Until he returns to judge the world. This demonstrates:

(1) That it was the steady belief of the primitive church that the Lord Jesus would return to judge the world; and,

(2) That it was designed that this ordinance should be perpetuated, and observed to the end of time. In every generation, therefore, and in every place where there are Christians, it is to be observed, until the Son of God shall return; and the necessity of its observance shall cease only when the whole body of the redeemed shall be permitted to see their Lord, and there shall be no need of those emblems to remind them of him, for all shall see him as he is.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 11:26". "Barnes' Notes on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/1-corinthians-11.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

For as often as ye eat this bread, and drink this cup,.... Not any bread, or any cup: but what is ate and drank in an ordinance way, and according to the institution and appointment of Christ, and with a view to the end proposed by him; and though there is no set fixed time for the administration of this ordinance, yet this phrase seems to suggest that it should be often: and very plainly signifies, that the bread and wine, after the blessing or thanksgiving, remain such, and are not converted into the real body and blood of Christ; but are only outward elements representing these to faith;

ye do show the Lord's death till he come; or rather, as it may be rendered in the imperative mood, as an exhortation, direction or command, "show ye the Lord's death till he come"; since everyone that eats and drinks at the Lord's table does not show forth his death, which is the great end to be answered by it; for the design of the institution of it is to declare that Christ died for the sins of his people: to represent him as crucified; to set forth the manner of his sufferings and death, by having his body wounded, bruised, and broken, and his blood shed; to express the blessings and benefits which come by his death, and his people's faith of interest in them; and to show their sense of gratitude, and declare their thankfulness for them; and all this, "till he come"; which shows the continuance of this ordinance, which is to last till Christ's second coming, where the carnal ordinances of the former dispensation were shaken and removed; and also the continuance of Gospel ministers to the end of the world, to administer it, and of churches to whom it is to be administered: this assures of the certainty of Christ's second coming; as it leads back to his coming in the flesh, suffering and dying in our stead, and thereby obtaining redemption for us; it leads forward to expect and believe he will come again, to put us into the full possession of the salvation he is the author of; when there will be no more occasion for this ordinance, nor any other, but all will cease, and God will be all in all. The apostle here refers to a custom used by the Jews in the night of the passover, to show forth the reason of their practice, and that institution to their children; when eitherF21Misn. Pesach. c. 10. sect. 4. Haggadah Shel. Pesach. p. 5. .

"the son asked the father, or if the son had not understanding (enough to ask), then the father taught him, saying, how different is this night from all other nights? for in all other nights we eat leavened and unleavened bread, but in this night only unleavened; in all other nights we eat the rest of herbs, but in this night bitter herbs; in all other nights we eat flesh roasted, broiled, and boiled, in this night only roasted; in all other nights we wash once, in this night twice; and as elsewhereF23Maimon. Chametz Umetzah, c. 8. sect. 2. it is added, in all other nights we eat sitting or lying, in this night all of us lie; and according to the capacity of the child, the father teaches him,'

particularly he was to inform him what these several things showed forth, or declaredF24Moses Kotsensis Mitzvot Tora prec. aff. 41. ; as that

"the passover מגיד, "declared", or "showed forth", that the Lord passed over the houses of our fathers in Egypt; the bitter herbs "showed forth", that the Egyptians made the lives of our fathers bitter in Egypt; and the unleavened bread "declared" that they were redeemed; and all these things are called הגדה, "the declaration", or showing forth:'

and there is a treatise called הגדה של פסח, "the showing forth of the passover"; in which, besides the things mentioned, and many others, it is observedF25P. 5, 6. Ed. Rittangel. & Seder. Tephillot. Ed. Basil. fol. 243. 1. , that it was commanded the Jews לספר, "to declare" the going out of Egypt, and that everyone that diligently declares the going out of Egypt, is praiseworthy: now the apostle observes this end of the Lord's supper, to show forth his death, in opposition to the notion of the "judaizing" Christians at Corinth, who thought of nothing else but the showing forth of the passover, and the declaration of that deliverance and redemption wrought for the people of Israel; whereas the true and only intent of it was to show forth the death of Christ, redemption by him, and the greatness of his love expressed therein, and which is to be continued till his second coming; whereas the time was come when it should "be no more said, the Lord liveth, that brought up the children of Israel out of the land of Egypt", Jeremiah 16:14.


Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 11:26". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/1-corinthians-11.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

For — in proof that the Lord‘s Supper is “in remembrance” of Him.

showannounce publicly. The Greek does not mean to dramatically represent, but “ye publicly profess each of you, the Lord has died FOR ME” [Wahl]. This word, as “is” in Christ‘s institution (1 Corinthians 11:24, 1 Corinthians 11:25), implies not literal presence, but a vivid realization, by faith, of Christ in the Lord‘s Supper, as a living person, not a mere abstract dogma, “bone of our bone, and flesh of our flesh” (Ephesians 5:30; compare Genesis 2:23); and ourselves “members of His body, of His flesh, and of His bones,” “our sinful bodies made clean by His body (once for all offered), and our souls washed through His most precious blood” [Church of England Prayer Book]. “Show,” or “announce,” is an expression applicable to new things; compare “show” as to the Passover (Exodus 13:8). So the Lord‘s death ought always to be fresh in our memory; compare in heaven, Revelation 5:6. That the Lord‘s Supper is in remembrance of Him, implies that He is bodily absent, though spiritually present, for we cannot be said to commemorate one absent. The fact that we not only show the Lord‘s death in the supper, but eat and drink the pledges of it, could only be understood by the Jews, accustomed to such feasts after propitiatory sacrifices, as implying our personal appropriation therein of the benefits of that death.

till he come — when there shall be no longer need of symbols of His body, the body itself being manifested. The Greek expresses the certainly of His coming. Rome teaches that we eat Christ present corporally, “till He come” corporally; a contradiction in terms. The showbread, literally, “bread of the presence,” was in the sanctuary, but not in the Holiest Place (Hebrews 9:1-8); so the Lord‘s Supper in heaven, the antitype to the Holiest Place, shall be superseded by Christ‘s own bodily presence; then the wine shall be drunk “anew” in the Father‘s kingdom, by Christ and His people together, of which heavenly banquet, the Lord‘s Supper is a spiritual foretaste and specimen (Matthew 26:29). Meantime, as the showbread was placed anew, every sabbath, on the table before the Lord (Leviticus 24:5-8); so the Lord‘s death was shown, or announced afresh at the Lord‘s table the first day of every week in the primitive Church. We are now “priests unto God” in the dispensation of Christ‘s spiritual presence, antitypical to the HOLY PLACE: the perfect and eternal dispensation, which shall not begin till Christ‘s coming, is antitypical to the HOLIEST PLACE, which Christ our High Priest alone in the flesh as yet has entered (Hebrews 9:6, Hebrews 9:7); but which, at His coming, we, too, who are believers, shall enter (Revelation 7:15; Revelation 21:22). The supper joins the two closing periods of the Old and the New dispensations. The first and second comings are considered as one coming, whence the expression is not “return,” but “come” (compare, however, John 14:3).


Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 11:26". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/1-corinthians-11.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

Till he come (αχρι ου ελτηιachri hou elthēi). Common idiom (with or without ανan) with the aorist subjunctive for future time (Robertson, Grammar, p. 975). In Luke 22:18 we have εως ου ελτηιheōs hou elthēi The Lord‘s Supper is the great preacher (καταγγελλετεkataggellete) of the death of Christ till his second coming (Matthew 26:29).


Copyright Statement
The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)

Bibliography
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 11:26". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/1-corinthians-11.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Ye do shew ( καταγγέλλετε )

Rev., better, proclaim. It is more than represent or signify. The Lord's death is preached in the celebration of the Eucharist. Compare Exodus 13:8, thou shalt shew. In the Jewish passover the word Haggadah denoted the historical explanation of the meaning of the passover rites given by the father to the son. Dr. Schaff says of the eucharistic service of the apostolic age: “The fourteenth chapter of first Corinthians makes the impression - to use an American phrase - of a religions meeting thrown open. Everybody who had a spiritual gift, whether it was the gift of tongues, of interpretation, of prophecy, or of sober, didactic teaching, had a right to speak, to pray, and to sing. Even women exercised their gifts” (“Introduction to the Didache”). See, further, on 1 Corinthians 14:33.


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The text of this work is public domain.

Bibliography
Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 11:26". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/1-corinthians-11.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

For as often as ye eat this bread, and drink this cup, ye do shew the Lord's death till he come.

Ye show forth the Lord's death — Ye proclaim, as it were, and openly avow it to God, and to all the world.

Till he come — In glory.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 11:26". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/1-corinthians-11.html. 1765.

The Fourfold Gospel

For as often as ye eat this bread, and drink the cup, ye proclaim the Lord's death till he come1.

  1. Ye proclaim the Lord's death till he come. This verse is a comment of Paul's upon the nature of the supper. In keeping the Lord's Supper we proclaim to our own souls and to the world our trust in the death of Christ, and our hope that he will return and fulfill the expectations begotten in us by it.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. These files were made available by Mr. Ernie Stefanik. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages.

Bibliography
J. W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 11:26". "The Fourfold Gospel". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/1-corinthians-11.html. Standard Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 1914.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

26.For as often as ye shall eat. Paul now adds what kind of remembrance ought to be cherished — that is, with thanksgiving; not that the remembrance consists wholly in confession with the mouth; for the chief thing is, that the efficacy of Christ’s death be sealed in our consciences; but this knowledge should stir us up to a confession in respect of praise, so as to declare before men what we feel inwardly before God. The Supper then is (so to speak) a kind of memorial, which must always remain in the Church, until the last coming of Christ; and it has been appointed for this purpose, that Christ may put us in mind of the benefit of his death, and that we may recognize it (697) before men. Hence it has the name of the Eucharist. (698) If, therefore, you would celebrate the Supper aright, you must bear in mind, that a profession of your faith is required from you. Hence we see how shamelessly those mock God, who boast that they have in the mass something of the nature of the Supper. For what is the mass? They confess (for I am not speaking of Papists, but of the pretended followers of Nicodemus) that it is full of abominable superstitions. By outward gesture they give a pretended approval of them. What kind of showing forth of the death of Christ is this? Do they not rather renounce it?

Until he come As we always need a help of this kind, so long as we are in this world, Paul intimates that this commemoration has been given us in charge, until Christ come to judgment. For as he is not present with us in a visible form, it is necessary for us to have some symbol of his presence, by which our minds may exercise themselves.


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 11:26". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/1-corinthians-11.html. 1840-57.

Vv. 26. "For as often as ye eat this bread, and drink the cup, ye do show the Lord"s death till He come."

It seems that in order to connect this verse with the foregoing, therefore or so that would be required, and not for or indeed. To explain the difficulty, Ewald has taken 1 Corinthians 11:26 as the continuation of the discourse of Jesus, which is, of course, inadmissible. Hofmann applies the for to the words of 1 Corinthians 11:22 : "I praise you not," which is equally inadmissible. Meyer, usually so rigorous, suffers here from a sort of philological faint; as the German word denn has sometimes the meaning of therefore, he translates: "in consequence of this institution by the Lord, see therefore what you do when you celebrate the communion." But what so great difficulty is there in preserving the literal sense of γάρ? All that is needed is to connect it with the words: in remembrance of me: "If Jesus so expressed Himself, it is because in fact the action you perform every time you celebrate the Supper is a memorial of His person. For the meaning of the action is to show His death." The idea of the action thus stated is really the reason of the manner in which Jesus instituted it.

In spite of all Holsten may say, the verb καταγγέλλετε is indicative: Ye show, not imperative: Show! For it is the essence of the action which is thus expressed. If καταγγέλλετε were the imperative, the γάρ would be inexplicable; οὖν or ὥστε would have been required, therefore or so that. With the practice which was becoming established at Corinth of making this feast a social act, a supper seasoned with agreeable conversation, Paul contrasts the moving memory, the celebration of the death.

The term show, καταγγέλλειν, vividly recalls the word Haggadah, which denoted in the Jewish Passover the historical explanation of the meaning of all the rites of the Paschal feast which the father, in answer to the eldest son"s ritual question, gave to his family. Perhaps the narrative of the Lord"s death was similarly rehearsed at the Holy Supper. In any case, every believer celebrated its efficacy in his heart, and his grateful cry mingled in the hymns of the assembly with that of his fellow-believers. The Doctrine of the Twelve Apostles implies that free course is left at this juncture for the words of the prophets present at the assembly. Paul therefore understands by the καταγγέλλειν, announce, the individual and collective proclamation of Christ"s love in His sacrifice, and of the glorious efficacy of this act. Each one confesses that he owes his salvation to this bloody death.

The τοῦτο, this, of the Greek text after ποτήριον, is to be rejected according to the Alex. and Greco-Lats. The words: till He come, are connected with the idea of the ἀνάμνησις, remembrance. Remembrance ceases when the Lord reappears. Holsten here finds the idea: that then the Lord"s death will have brought to an end the exercise of its salutary efficacy. I see in the text no trace whatever of this thought. Paul means that the Holy Supper is the Church"s compensation for the visible presence of Christ. It is, so to speak, the link between His two comings: the monument of the one, the pledge of the other. Thus Paul simply reproduces the meaning of the words of Jesus preserved by Luke (Luke 22:18): "I say unto you, I will not drink from henceforth of the fruit of the vine until the kingdom of God shall come." If we read ἄν, it indicates the uncertainty of the time when Jesus shall come.


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Bibliography
Godet, Frédéric Louis. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 11:26". "Frédéric Louis Godet - Commentary on Selected Books". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsc/1-corinthians-11.html.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

‘TILL HE COME’

‘For as often as ye eat this bread, and drink this cup, ye do shew the Lord’s death till He come.’

1 Corinthians 11:26

So St. Paul sums up his teaching about Holy Communion. He has shown that this sacred ordinance is in no way left to man’s ideas or fancies, either in its origin or mode of celebration. He has told us its source, whence it comes. Our warrant is Christ’s own institution. It is a memorial feast designed not by man but by the Lord Himself, Who knows our needs. It is a feast; it is a memorial. And as he tells us its origin and its nature, so too he tells us its duration—‘till He come.’

I. This memorial of the Sacrifice of Calvary once offered is to sound forth along the whole course of time, repeated in the ears of generations yet unborn, carrying on into the future the sweet accents of the love of God and the condescension of our Lord Jesus Christ. Before the eyes of men in all coming time this picture of Christ crucified, the broken bread and poured-out wine, are to be set forth, that we may ‘remember the exceeding great love of our Master and only Saviour Jesus Christ thus dying for us, and the innumerable benefits which by His precious blood-shedding He hath obtained for us.’ Within the reach of all Christians this feast is to be spread and the invitation go forth that they should draw nigh and eat and drink, and live for ever, until time shall have an end. ‘Till He come,’ for then the last echoes shall die away, the picture will be needed no more, the doors of the banqueting hall shall be closed, for the Lord shall have come.

II. There was need that its duration should be plainly taught.—The Apostle foresaw that the heresy would arise of denying the necessity of Holy Communion, saying it was only for a time, the need of it had but passed away. ‘Till he come.’ There is reason in this as in all else which belongs to the religion of Christ. The Lord has gone away from us so far as His visible presence is concerned, but only for a time. And in His absence the dying gift He gave to His Church is very precious, His last bequest dear beyond all price, the picture of His death fashioned by His own hands in His love very sweet to look upon. As often as we eat this Bread and drink this Cup and show forth before the Father the Lord’s Death, all He has done for us comes back to us with a living freshness, as when first we heard it, and a lively remembrance of His Death is ours. But we shall not need it always—only till he come; for then the need will disappear, when the Bridegroom Himself shall have come to His bride.

III. It is true, too, of the other ways in which Holy Communion is a memorial.—We show the Lord’s Death before the world. It is our declaration to a careless, unbelieving world that we believe in the Crucified, but the world will not require this preaching of the Cross then, for ‘every eye shall see Him and they also which pierced Him.’ We show the Lord’s Death before God. In Holy Communion we plead before the Father what Christ has done. In the very act and words of Christ Himself we pray ‘for Jesus Christ’s sake.’ It is the highest form of prayer we Christians possess. But when he comes, prayer will be changed into praise! Instead of pleading the Sacrifice of Jesus for our own sins and the sins of the whole world, we shall adore Him that sitteth upon the throne.

IV. Holy Communion is more than a memorial: it is a feast.—Not only refreshment to the mind, but food for the soul; not only a calling to remembrance what Christ has done for us, but a partaking of Christ; not only a gazing upon, but eating and drinking. And what are its benefits which are thereby conveyed to us? We are told in the Prayer of Humble Access. Strengthening and cleansing, these are the blessings offered to us. Well, then, this Holy Communion can only be for a time—‘Till He come.’ Yes, we shall not always need thus to be strengthened or cleansed; strengthening is for the weak, cleansing for the sinning. But when the Lord shall come we shall be made strong, our weakness made perfect in His strength. We shall need no more cleansing, for our baptismal robe shall be washed white in the Blood of the Lamb, never again to be stained with sin in that holy place where there ‘shall in no wise enter anything that defileth.’

V. What, then, is the practical lesson for each one of us?—Not surely to stand aloof from this Blessed Sacrament, as do so many, and neglect to use it. Nay, but just as the Coming of the Lord is a real event, as we look and wait, and pray for it, as each Advent season here points onwards to and reminds us of the day when He shall come, this Holy Communion, the witness of His Coming, must be very precious to us. It is given to us by our loving Lord for our sustenance in this earthly pilgrimage through which we are journeying, and each true-hearted servant must count it his chiefest privilege frequently, reverently, and regularly to ‘shew the Lord’s Death till He come.’

—Bishop C. J. Ridgeway.

(SECOND OUTLINE)

THE HOLY EUCHARIST

Many controversies have gathered around that quiet place of peace, the holy table. To-day we will shut out all these, and ask our Master to meet us. The first Lord’s Supper lives—identical and immortal—in the Lord’s Supper of to-day. And in it lives all He did, all He said, all He was and is, and is to be.

I. Ye do proclaim the Lord’s death, i.e. the tidings of it, to one another. As instituted, the holy service is nothing if not social, mutual. Scripture knows nothing of a solitary Eucharist. The rite has a mutual significance.

II. The Lord’s death.—That is the central message; the mortal is the vital here. The broken bread, the poured-out wine, the institution, all take us to the Cross. Every communion draws afresh the sacred life of atoning blood around all our hopes, all our life.

III. We proclaim His glorious life by the very fact of proclaiming His death. Never would the first believers have kept festival over their Master’s death, had not that death been followed by a triumph over the grave. Only the Risen Christ can explain the joy of the Lord’s Supper. He is alive for evermore, and He is our life. Feed on Him—everywhere and always upon Him.

IV. Till He come.—As the Supper is our witness to the part of the finished course and to the presence of the Risen life, so it is our infallible prophecy of the coming glory. Even so, come, Lord Jesus, adored and longed for.

—Bishop H. C. G. Moule.

(THIRD OUTLINE)

THE LORD’S DEATH

The Lord’s Supper commemorates Christ’s Death. No Life was like Christ’s: none ever was so full of light and love and sweetness. But Our Lord Himself, and the Evangelists four, and the Apostles besides laid the emphasis on His Death. The Lord’s Supper was ordained in remembrance, not of His Incarnation, but of His Death. There is a legend in the Lives of the Saints that the devil once appeared to St. Martin in the likeness of the Lord, and demanded from him obedience. ‘If thou art my Lord, show me thy wounds,’ replied the saint.

I. Christ was Divine.—He was God. The finished Sacrifice of Calvary was a Divine Sacrifice.

II. His death was voluntary.—Love nailed Him to the Cross. ‘Christ … offered Himself’ (Hebrews 9:14).

III. To suffer for the guilty is precisely what generous and noble natures long to do.

IV. In this wondrous death we see

(a) God’s love.

(b) God’s wisdom.

(c) God’s power.

It is the story of the Crucified Saviour that melts human hearts and transforms human lives.

—Rev. F. Harper.

Illustration

‘A boy ran away from his home. His father told him never to come back again, as he did not want to see his face any more, and his son said he never would. But the mother did not forget her boy so soon. Her mother’s heart could not give up her boy, and she began to pine about him.… Well, it came at last to a bed of sickness, which presently proved to be a bed of death. The father went to his wife’s bedside, and asked her, “Is there anything I can do for you?” At first there was no answer, but he pressed her again, to see if there were anything he could possibly do for her. “No,” she said, “nothing, except this—bring me back my boy.” But he had said that he should never come back, and he was not going to give in. No; he would not do this. The next day the same request being put to her, she gave the same answer—“Bring me back my boy.” The father then wrote to his son, who was away, and said, “Charlie, your mother wants you to come back.” “No,” replied the boy, “not until father wants me to come back will I return.” Again the request was made of his wife as to what could be done, and again the answer was, “Bring me back my boy.” Then the father wrote to his son, “Charlie, your mother’s dying; come home.” He took the first train to come home to his mother, and when he arrived, he went into her room and stood on one side of her dying bed. The father came in, and stood at the other side. They looked at each other, the son at the dying mother, and the husband at the dying wife. They spoke to her, but not to each other. The dying woman at length said, “Father, won’t you speak to Charlie?” “No.” Then she asked her boy, “Charlie, won’t you speak to your father?” “No,” replied he, “he must speak to me first.” She pleaded with them, and besought them with her dying breath to be reconciled, but they would not. Then, raising herself from her bed, she took the hand of the boy and the hand of the father, and placing one inside the other, she fell back on her pillow dead. That father looked into the eyes of the boy, and the boy looked into the eyes of his father, and they both commenced to sob like little children. The father said, “Charlie, I forgive you; will you forgive me?” “Yes,” said Charlie, and, with clasped hands, they were reconciled over the dead body of the mother. It is a picture, and a very beautiful picture of reconciliation. Here you may be reconciled over the body of the Crucified One, over the Crucified at Calvary. But the picture does not hold in this respect: your Father is not unwilling to be reconciled to you, but He is pleading with you. I was going to say that His Heart is breaking for you.’


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Nisbet, James. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 11:26". Church Pulpit Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/1-corinthians-11.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

26 For as often as ye eat this bread, and drink this cup, ye do shew the Lord’s death till he come.

Ver. 26. Ye do show] We need no other crucifix to mind us of Christ’s passion. Hence this sacrament was by some ancients termed a sacrifice, viz. representative and commemorative, but not properly, as the Papists make it.

Till he come] There shall be a Church then, and the pure worship of God, till the world’s end, maugre the malice of tyrants and heretics.


Copyright Statement
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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 11:26". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/1-corinthians-11.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

1 Corinthians 11:26

I. It is a very wonderful fact, very startling at first sight to those who have not steadily considered it, that the chief ordinance of Christianity is the commemoration and proclamation of a death. Festivals of the nativity, of the resurrection, of the ascension, however beautiful may be their meaning and benign their influence, are at any rate not of Divine institution. The feast which Christ instituted is the proclamation to all ages of His death. Most surely our Lord must have intended to indicate thereby that feature of His work which He conceived to be in most vital relation to the accomplishment of His great hope for man. The death rather than the life, the life as looking on to the death and to all that was to spring from it, and the death as the most fruitful act and the most powerful instrument of His love, must be the chief fountain of peace, joy, and hope for mankind.

II. If this be true, if the Lord's death be the most luminous, the most blessed, the most quickening act of His life, truly and most deeply a birth into the eternal sphere, it casts most beautiful light upon our life and our death. The man who knew most deeply God's counsel about life, whose human life grew richer, grander, more pregnant with a glorious hope as the earthly element dropped piece-meal into the tomb, made this his aspiration and his prayer—"That I may know Him, and the power of His resurrection, and the fellowship of His sufferings, being conformed to His death." No lives are so drearily cheerless as those which have been successful in the sole pursuit of gold; no future so blank as theirs, no eternity so dread. Look round on your supremely successful men. Estimate the number of rays of pure joy that shine upon their hearts and break the dreary gloom of their lives, and compare them with the man whose life is one deep-voiced hymn of triumph—"I thank my God, through Jesus Christ my Lord," because I have learnt from Him, through His death, to call that life, and that only, which is eternal.

J. Baldwin Brown, The Sunday Afternoon, p. 219.


References: 1 Corinthians 11:26.—G. Calthrop, Pulpit Recollections, p. 207; W. Cunningham, Sermons, p. 356; S. Minton, Christian World Pulpit, vol. ii., p. 42; Clergyman's Magazine, vol. i., p. 283; vol. iv., p. 224; vol. vi., p. 83; T. Arnold, Sermons, vol. iv., p. 228; F. D. Maurice, Sermons, vol. iv., p. 111; T. Birkett Dover, A Lent Manual, p. 151; Sermons on the Catechism, p. 242.


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Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 11:26". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/1-corinthians-11.html.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

1 Corinthians 11:26. As often as ye eat this bread It is no wonder that a text, in which this element is so plainly called bread, after consecration, should be urged against the popish doctrine of transubstantiation: it signifies little for the favourers of that opinion to plead, that the Scriptures sometimes call things changed by the name of the thing out of which they were made, (as Adam is called dust, Gen. iii 19. Aaron's serpent a rod, Exodus 7:12.) or call them according to their sensible appearance (as Joshua 5:13. Mark 16:5.); for these instances rather turn against them, by proving that where the literal interpretation is evidently absurd, we must have recourse to the figurative. Nothing can be more unreasonable than to refer the last clause of this verse, as the Quakers do, to the time when Christ should come, by his spiritual illumination on their minds, to take them off from carnal ordinances; for, not to insist upon it, that we have at least as much need of the Lord's supper as the primitive Christians had,—not having many advantages which they had, such as the miraculous gifts, &c.—it is evident that the grand coming of Christ by the Spirit was, when it was poured out on the day of Pentecost; an event many years prior to the date of this Epistle. See Doddridge, Stillingfleet, and Tillotson.


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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 11:26". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/1-corinthians-11.html. 1801-1803.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

26.] γάρ gives an explanatory reason for εἰς τ. ἐμὴν ἀνάμν., viz. that the act of eating and drinking is a proclamation of the death of the Lord till His coming. The rendering of καταγγέλλετε imperative, as Theophyl.?, Luth., Grot., Rückert, is evidently wrong. The Apostle is substantiating the application of the Lord’s words by the acknowledged nature of the rite. It is a proclamation of His death: and thus is a remembrance of Him. It is so, by our making mention of in it, and seeing visibly before us and partaking of, His body broken, and His blood shed.

ἄχρις οὗ ἔλθῃ] The καταγγ. is addressed directly to the Corinthians, not to them and all succeeding Christians; the Apostle regarding the coming of the Lord as near at hand, in his own time, see notes on 2 Corinthians 5:1-10. Thdrt. remarks, μετὰ γὰρ τὴν αὐτοῦ παρουσίαν, οὐκέτι χρεία τῶν συμβόλων τοῦ σώματος, αὐτοῦ φαινομένου τοῦ σώματος· διὰ τοῦτο εἶπεν, ἄχρις οὗ ( ἂν) ἔλθῃ.

The ἄν has been inserted from not being aware that its absence implies the certainty of the event. See examples in Lobeck on Phrynichus, pp. 15, 16, note.


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Alford, Henry. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 11:26". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/1-corinthians-11.html. 1863-1878.

Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae

DISCOURSE: 1978

THE DESIGN AND IMPORTANCE OF THE LORD’S SUPPER

1 Corinthians 11:24; 1 Corinthians 11:26. This do in remembrance of me .. for as often as ye eat this bread, and drink this cup, ye do shew the Lord’s death till he come.

THE Corinthians had shamefully profaned the Lord’s supper. St. Paul reproves them, and rectifies their views of that ordinance.

I. The design of the Lord’s supper—

Our ungrateful hearts are prone to forget the richest mercies. To keep up “the remembrance” of his death, Christ instituted his last supper. When we celebrate that ordinance, we “shew forth” his death—

[The passover was a memorial of the deliverance vouchsafed to the Jews from the sword of the destroying angel. At every returning celebration of it the reason of that ordinance was declared [Note: In reference to Exodus 12:26-27. a custom obtained among the Jews that a child should ask the meaning of the passover, and that the person who presided should then give an account of its intent and origin, that so the remembrance of God’s mercy might be transmitted to their latest posterity: and this was called “the declaration” or “shewing forth.” Dr. Gill on the text.]. Christ in his death has effected a greater deliverance for us. In partaking of the bread and wine we “shew forth” his death: we shew forth the manner of it as excruciating and bloody [Note: The breaking of the bread and the pouring out of the wine seem well calculated to impress this idea.]: we shew forth the end of it as a sacrifice for our sins [Note: In this light it is represented by St. Paul, 1 Corinthians 5:7 and by our Lord himself, Matthew 26:28.]: we shew forth the sufficiency of it for our full salvation [Note: We express our affiance in his blood as the Jews did in the blood of the Paschal Lamb, when they sprinkled their door-posts with it, and eat of the flesh that had been roast with fire.].]

We shew forth his death “till he come”—

[Christ will, in due season, come again to judge the world; then his people will no longer need such memorials as these. They will incessantly enjoy the brightest vision of his person, and the richest fruits of his death; but till then the remembrance of his dying love, and the expectation of his future advent, must be thus preserved. Such was Christ’s end in instituting, and such should be our end in observing it.]

To enforce the observance of this ordinance, we will proceed to shew,

II. The necessity of attending it—

The duty of commemorating our Lord’s death is much neglected; but a neglect of it involves us in the deepest guilt. It implies,

1. Rebellion against the highest authority—

[Christ, the Supreme Governor of heaven and earth, has said, “Do this”; yet the language of too many is, ‘I will not.’ But they who disregarded the passover did not go unpunished [Note: If a man had contracted any ceremonial defilement, or were on a journey, he might omit eating the passover at the appointed time; only he must eat it a month afterwards. But if he forbore to eat of it without any such impediment, God said concerning him. “That soul shall be cut off, that man shall bear his sin.” Numbers 9:7-11.]; much less shall they who slight the invitations to Christ’s supper [Note: Luke 14:24.]. Surely it is no less than madness to persist in this rebellion.]

2. Ingratitude towards our greatest Benefactor—

[Christ has even “given his own life a ransom for us;” and shall we disregard his dying command? On the same night that he was betrayed, did he institute these memorials of his death. Had he at that season such a concern for us, and can we refuse to do so small a thing in remembrance of him? The Jews went thrice every year up to Jersusalem, from the extreme parts of Jud ζa, to commemorate their deliverance. And shall we turn our backs on the table when it is spread before us? Shall not God visit for such ingratitude as this [Note: Let such conduct be expressed in words; “Thou didst indeed give thy body to be broken, &c. for me; and only requirest me to eat bread, &c. in remembrance of thee; but I account even that too much to do for thee:” Who could dare to utter such language? Or who would endure it if spoken by his servant or his child? Yet such is the language of our actions.]?]

3. Contempt of the richest mercies—

[To communicate, without discerning the Lord’s body, can profit us nothing; but to approach the table in humility and faith is a sure mean of obtaining all spiritual blessings. Christ sometimes reveals himself in the breaking of bread, to those who had not so fully discovered him in the ministration of the word [Note: Luke 24:30-31.]. And do they not manifest a contempt of these mercies, who will not use the means of procuring them? How may the Saviour take up that lamentation over them [Note: Matthew 23:37.]—!]

4. A renunciation of our baptismal covenant—

[In baptism we covenanted to renounce the world, &c and to serve God: this covenant we ought to renew and confirm at the Lord’s table. But our refusing to confirm it is a tacit renunciation of it. And can we hope that God will fulfil his part while we violate ours? Will he be our God when we refuse to be his people?]

We shall conclude with answering some excuses—

[‘I am not prepared.’ How then can you be prepared to die [Note: Is not this acknowledgment the strongest reason for immediate repentance?]? ‘I am afraid of eating and drinking my own damnation.’ Are you not afraid of damnation for neglecting your duty [Note: In neglecting duty you ensure condemnation; in practising it as well as you can (to say the least) you may avert it.]? ‘I am afraid of sinning afterwards, and thereby increasing my guilt.’ If sins after receiving the Lord’s supper were unpardonable, none should receive it till the last moment of their lives [Note: If you really desire strength, where would you so soon obtain it? But if you determine to live in sin, your condemnation will be equally sure whether you come or not.]. ‘The time of administering it interferes with other engagements.’ To those who cannot deny themselves in any thing, we say with Paul [Note: Romans 3:8. “whose damnation is just.”]—; but where the difficulties are insurmountable, God will accept the will for the deed [Note: Matthew 12:7.]. They however, who are at liberty, should attend “as often” as they can; only they must be careful to communicate with reverence, humility, faith, and gratitude.]


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Simeon, Charles. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 11:26". Charles Simeon's Horae Homileticae. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/shh/1-corinthians-11.html. 1832.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

1 Corinthians 11:26. Not still words of Christ (Ewald),(1865) in citing which Paul glides involuntarily into the form into which they had by this time become moulded in the church; for against this view there is (1) the unsuitableness in itself of such a ὓστερον πρότερον in the expression (especially after 1 Corinthians 11:23); (2) the fact of the words being linked to the preceding by γάρ, which is less in keeping with the tone and direct form of the words of institution, but, on the other hand, naturally marks the apostle himself again beginning to speak; and (3) the fact that Luke has nothing of a similar kind in his account of the Supper. The common view is the right one, that Paul proceeds here in his own person. But what he gives is neither a further reason assigned for οὐκ ἐπαινῶ in 1 Corinthians 11:22 (so Hofmann, in connection with his incorrect interpretation of ὅτι in 1 Corinthians 11:23), nor is it an experimental elucidation of the last words of 1 Corinthians 11:25 (the ordinary view), for the contents of 1 Corinthians 11:26 stand rather in the logical relation of consequence to the foregoing narrative of institution. No; γάρ is to be taken here (comp on 1 Corinthians 11:22) in its inferential sense, and made to refer to the whole preceding account of the origin of the Supper. We may paraphrase thus: Such, then, being the facts of the original institution, it comes to pass that as often as ye, etc.

τὸν ἄρτον τοῦτον] the bread prescribed according to this appointment of Christ; τὸ ποτήριον: the cup now spoken of, the eucharistic cup.

καταγγέλλετε] ye proclaim the Lord’s death, i.e. ye declare solemnly in connection with this ordinance, that Christ has died for you. This καταγγέλλειν cannot without arbitrariness be taken as merely a declaring by action (so commonly); it can only be taken as actually oral.(1867) How it took place, we do not know. The Peschito (the Vulgate has annuntiabitis) rightly took καταγγ. as indicative (so also Theophylact, Beza, Bengel, de Wette, Osiander, Kahnis, Neander, Maier, Rückert in his Abendm. p. 211, Hofmann), which Grotius and others ought not to have changed into annuntiare debetis; for the proclamation in question was an essential thing which took place at the Supper, and therefore an admonition to it would have been inappropriate. Even in the case of unworthy participation the καταγγέλλειν referred to was not omitted; the admonition, therefore, could only have respect to the worthiness of the participation, with which that καταγγέλλειν was connected; and, in point of fact, such an admonition follows accordingly in 1 Corinthians 11:27 f. We must reject therefore the view commonly taken by other interpreters (and necessarily adopted by Ewald in accordance with his view of the verse as given above), namely, that καταγγ. is imperative. See, besides, Rodatz in Lücke and Wieseler’s Vierteljahrschr. I. 3, p. 351.

ἄχρις οὖ ἔλθῃ] until He shall have come; for the apostle was convinced that the Parousia was close at hand, and therefore future generations could not have been present to his mind in writing thus; but to apply his words to them is historically necessary and right.

ἄχρις stands without ἄν (see instances in Lobeck, a(1868) Phryn. p. 15 f.), because the arrival of the Parousia is conceived as absolutely certain, not as conditioned by any contingencies which might possibly delay it (Hermann, part. ἄν, p. 109 ff.). In Galatians 4:19 also, Paul, in the earnestness of his love, conceives the result as equally certain (against Rückert’s objection). After the Parousia the Lord Himself is again there. Theodoret: μετὰ γὰρ δὴ τὴν αὐτοῦ παρουσίαν οὐκέτι χρεία τῶν συμβόλων τοῦ σώματος, αὐτοῦ φαινομένου τοῦ σώματος· διὰ τοῦτο εἶπεν· ἄχρις οὗ ἂν ἔλθῃ. To eat with Him will then be a new thing (Matthew 26:29); but until then the proclamation here spoken of is not to be silenced. How that thought was fitted to keep constantly before their minds the solemn responsibility of an unworthy participation in the Supper (see 1 Corinthians 11:27)! In this way Paul links to the καταγγέλλειν of the communicants the fear and trembling of the Maran atha, 1 Corinthians 16:22.


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Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 11:26". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/1-corinthians-11.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

1 Corinthians 11:26. τὸν θάνατον τοῦ κυρίου, the death of the Lord) the death, by which Christ was sacrificed for us [and His blood was separated from His body. Hence he says separately, This is my body; and separately, This is my blood.—V. g.] So also, He is mentioned in the Apocalypse as a lamb, that had been slain.— καταγγέλλετε, ye announce [show]) The Indicative, with the for, is to be referred to the, I have delivered, 1 Corinthians 11:23. He convicts the Corinthians from their own practice, such as it was. New things are announced [shown forth], and the death of the Lord ought always to be new [fresh] in our memory; Exodus 13:8, καὶ ἀναγγελεῖς, and thou shalt show [announce]; referring to the passover; whence the paschal lesson is called הגרה, the annunciation. The Syriac version also has the indicative.— ἄχρις οὗ, until) Paul derives this from the particle ἕως, Matthew 26:29, whatever seems to be lost to us by Christ’s going away, is compensated by the Lord’s Supper as by a kind of equivalent, so that from the time of the Lord’s departure from the sight of believers to His visible and glorious coming, we still have Himself, whom for a time we do not see. What was conspicuous in our Redeemer has passed into the sacraments; Leo the Great, Serm. 2 on the ascension. On this account it is said in remembrance of Me: and of this mode of remembering there was no need, as long as He was in person with His disciples; consequently He did not institute the Supper sooner, but on that night, on which His being betrayed broke off the visible intercourse with Jesus upon the earth; but He instituted it then, lest He should also be forgotten, when no longer seen. It may be asked, why did He not institute the Supper, during the forty days that elapsed between His resurrection and ascension? Ans. 1. Because it chiefly relates to the remembrance of His death. 2. The Sacred Supper is a specimen as it were of communion at the same heavenly banquet with Christ in heaven, but after His resurrection, Christ did not eat and drink with His disciples, but merely ate with them, and only for the purpose of convincing them of His being truly raised from the dead and of His actual presence with them. This remembrance is of the closest and most vivid kind, such as is the remembrance of children towards their parents, of a wife towards her husband, of a brother towards a brother, united with faith, love, desire, hope, joy, obedience, and comprehending the whole of the Christian’s present condition. This relation to Christ is in force from the close of His last feast with His disciples till His coming again, Matthew 26:29. This mystery joins the two closing periods of the two Dispensations, the Old and New.— ἄν) at whatever time His coming may take place.(102) Then it will be drunk new, Matthew 26:29.— ἔλθῃ, come) in glory, 1 Corinthians 4:5. It is not called a return; comp. Acts 1:11, note.

ABCD corrected later, G omit ἂν. Rec. Text has none of the oldest authorities on its side in reading ἂν.—ED.


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Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 11:26". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/1-corinthians-11.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

From hence it appears, that the bread and wine is not (as papists say) transubstantiated, or turned into the very substance of the flesh and blood of Christ, when the communicants eat it and drink it. It is still the same bread and cup it was. The end of the institution is but to commemorate Christ’s death; and upon that account the waiting upon God in this ordinance, will be a standing duty incumbent upon Christians, until Christ shall come to judgment. Some think, show ye, is a better translation of the verb, than (as we translate it)

ye do show; wherefore so behave yourselves at this ordinance, as those who know what they have to do in it, that is, to show forth the death of the Lord Jesus Christ.


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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 11:26". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/1-corinthians-11.html. 1685.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

Eat this bread; Christ does not call it flesh, and it was not flesh which they ate, but it was bread, representing the flesh or body of Jesus Christ, which was broken or crucified for the sins of men; and they were to do this from time to time, as a public expression of their faith in him, and devotion to his service.


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Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 11:26". "Family Bible New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/1-corinthians-11.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges

26. ὁσάκις γὰρ ἐάν. The A.V. somewhat obscures the repetition of these words, by translating ‘oft,’ and ‘often.’ These words are not those of Christ, but of St Paul. John 3:31-36, and Galatians 2:15-21 are somewhat similar instances, but in them it is by no means certain that we have a commentary by the writer on the speech he records, but quite possible that the passage forms part of the speech itself.

τὸν θάνατον τοῦ κυρίου. Because the Sacrament was the appointed memorial of that Death.

καταγγέλλετε. Tell, Wiclif. Annuntiabitis, Calvin and the Vulgate. Annoncerez, De Sacy. Some (e. g. the margin of the English Bible) take this imperatively, but it is better as in the text.

ἄχρις οὗ ἔλθῃ. Until He shall have come. The ἄν of the rec. text is less strongly supported. See Critical Note. And it also is suspicious in that it introduces an element of doubt where St Paul can have had none whatever.


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"Commentary on 1 Corinthians 11:26". "Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cgt/1-corinthians-11.html. 1896.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

26. As often—In some periods of the Church, daily communion has been the practice. But a wiser Christian custom is to consider it as more an extraordinary event than the Sabbath service. The monthly period preserves the medium between making it too ordinary and too unfrequent.

Bread—As the bread of the passover was appointed by God with a significant purpose to be unleavened, there was some show of reason for using such bread by the Roman Church, but no show of reason for the Greek and Roman Churches making the use a matter of fierce contention. As it is a matter of mere inference, fixed by no definition or command, the Protestant Churches (except the Lutheran) have considered it a matter of indifference.

Cup—See our note on Matthew 26:27.

Show—Literally, ye announce, as a messenger or herald, to the world. The act, with its surrounding circumstances and utterances, proclaims to the world Christ’s atoning death, and the believer’s acceptance of its avails.

Till he come— When the entire system of sublunary Church and probation will be closed. Thus the communion is a chain whose links connect the first and second advents of Christ. This corrects the error of the Quakers, who, aiming at too naked a spirituality, have rejected all ordinances, and have thus made their religion a soul without a body. It is, doubtless, owing to this cause that they are fading from existence as a Christian body. Neglecting the great injunction to show forth the Lord’s death, they have become (1 Corinthians 11:30) weak and sickly, and are apparently going to sleep.


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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 11:26". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/1-corinthians-11.html. 1874-1909.

William Godbey's Commentary on the New Testament

26. As often as you may eat this bread and drink this cup, you do show forth the death of the Lord until He may come.” Hence we see the sacrament of the Lord’s Supper is to be perpetuated until He returns to the earth, since it is a memento of our absent Lord. It is a valuable means of grace, perpetuatory of our membership in the visible church, as our baptism is initiatory.


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Godbey, William. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 11:26". "William Godbey's Commentary on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ges/1-corinthians-11.html.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

'For as often as you eat this bread, and drink the cup, you proclaim the Lord's death till he come.'

And in their participation of Him in this way they should also recognise that they were proclaiming His death, in which they were participating, something they would continue to do until His coming again. This feast would go on and on being celebrated and would never cease until His return at His second coming. Through it they would continue to proclaim the Lord's death, and all that it signified, until that coming again. Thus the Lord's Supper was to be both a looking back to His death and resurrection (a proclaiming of His death and a recognition that we have been crucified and raised with Him - Galatians 2:20; Ephesians 2:6), a present participation in His death (reckoning ourselves daily as having died with Him and having risen again - Romans 6:11), and a looking forward to the final fruits of His death and resurrection when He would come in glory to be revealed as Lord of all (chapter 15). And it was an expression of His total oneness together with His people.

'You proclaim the Lord's death till he come.' Some see this as signifying that the proclaiming is not in the act of the meal, but a proclaiming that takes place while the meal is going on. But both are surely part of each other. The meal certainly proclaims His death, and no doubt verbal proclamation also took place. But it does emphasise that central to both is the proclamation of Jesus Christ and Him the crucified One (1 Corinthians 1:17-18; 1 Corinthians 2:2). It may be that some of the Corinthians were seeing other symbols from the meal than that of Jesus Christ in His death for them, possibly in terms of a magical reception of divine power and enlightenment. So Paul again emphasises the centrality of 'the word of the cross' (1 Corinthians 1:18).


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Pett, Peter. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 11:26". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/1-corinthians-11.html. 2013.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

Paul continued Jesus" explanation. Participation in the Lord"s Supper dramatizes the gospel. The service becomes a visual as well as an audio setting forth of the death of Christ and its significance.

"The Eucharist is an acted sermon, an acted proclamation of the death which it commemorates; but it is possible that there is reference to some expression of belief in the atoning death of Christ as being a usual element in the service." [Note: Robertson and Plummer, p249.]

Paul may have referred to "the cup" rather than "the wine," which would have been parallel to "the bread," to avoid the direct identification of the wine in the cup with blood. The idea of drinking blood was revolting to most people in the ancient world, particularly the Jews. [Note: Barrett, p268.] On the other hand, he may have viewed both elements symbolically, the cup being a symbol of one"s lot in life, particularly judgment, and the bread a symbol of what sustains life.

The Lord"s Supper is not only a memorial celebration looking back to Jesus Christ"s first advent. It is also an anticipatory celebration looking forward to His second advent. Evidently when the Lord returns to set up His earthly kingdom He will establish a new form of worship that will include the offering of certain animal sacrifices ( Ezekiel 40-46). These will be similar to the animal sacrifices the Jews offered under the Old Covenant. However since Jesus Christ has made a final sacrifice these animal offerings will evidently be memorial and entirely for worship, not for the expiation of sin. Another possibility is that they will have some role in restoring fellowship with God then. [Note: See Jerry M. Hullinger, "The Problem of Animal Sacrifices in Ezekiel 40-48 ," Bibliotheca Sacra152:607 (July-September1995):279-89.]

"The Communion is not supposed to be a time of "spiritual autopsy" and grief, even though confession of sin is important. It should be a time of thanksgiving and joyful anticipation of seeing the Lord!" [Note: Wiersbe, 1:607.]

In this section Paul reviewed and expounded the significance of the Lord"s Supper so his readers would value and celebrate it appropriately.

"In short, Paul is doing one thing and one thing alone. He is impressing on the Corinthians the tremendous importance of doing just this: eating this bread and drinking this cup. It Isaiah , after all, a matter of celebrating the Lord"s death." [Note: Troels Engberg-Pedersen, "Proclaiming the Lord"s Death," in Pauline Theology. Vol. II: 1 & 2 Corinthians , p116.]


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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 11:26". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/1-corinthians-11.html. 2012.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

1 Corinthians 11:26. For as often as ye eat this bread, and drink the cup,(1) ye proclaim the Lord’s deathhold it forth as, to you, a certain facttill he come.(2) This clearly shows not only that the observance of this ordinance was designed to continue from the very time of its first institution till the second appearing of the Lord Jesus, but that the belief of the one as the great accomplished fact of the past, and of the other as the great expected fact of the future, was—as the substance of all Christianity—proclaimed by every participant of the Lord’s Supper, and the faith of the one and the hope of the other are the two “wings as eagles,” on which the Christian mounts up heavenward.


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Bibliography
Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 11:26". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/1-corinthians-11.html. 1879-90.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

1 Corinthians 11:26. Familiarity helped to blunt in the Cor(1762) their reverence for the Eucharist; hence the repeated ὁσάκις ἐάν: “for so many times as you eat this bread and drink the cup, you are proclaiming the Lord’s death, until He come”. γὰρ has its proper explicative force: Christ bade His disciples thus perpetually commemorate Him (1 Corinthians 11:24 f.: ποιεῖτε, “go on to do”—sustained action), “for it is thus that you publish His death, and in this form the testimony will continue till He comes again.” καταγγέλλετε (see parls.), on this view ind(1763), is the active expression of ἀνάμνησις: “Christus de beneficio mortis suae nos admonet, et nos coram hominibus id recognovimus” (Cv(1764)). The ordinance is a verbum visi-bile, a “preaching” of the entire Church in silent ministry: “Christi sanguis scripturarum omnium sacramento ac testimonio effusus prœdicatur” (Cyprian, quoted by Ed(1765)). ἄχρι οὗ ἔλθῃ states the terminus ad quem given in the words of Jesus at the Table, Luke 22:18, Matthew 26:29. The rite looks forward as well as backward; a rehearsal of the Passion Supper, a foretaste of the Marriage Supper of the Lamb. Paul thus “associates with the καταγγέλλειν of the celebrants the fear and trembling that belong to the Maranatha of 1 Corinthians 16:22” (Mr(1766)). The pathos and the glory of the Table of the Lord were alike lost on the Corinthians.


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Bibliography
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 11:26". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/1-corinthians-11.html. 1897-1910.

Mark Dunagan Commentary on the Bible

1 Corinthians 11:26 For as often as ye eat this bread, and drink the cup, ye proclaim the Lord"s death till he come.

"proclaim"-2605. kataggello {kat-ang-gel"-lo}; from 2596 and the base of 32; to proclaim, promulgate: -declare, preach, shew, speak of, teach.

-"you are heralding" (Knox); "re-telling the message" (Tay). This is the only memorial that Jesus gave us for remembering His death. "For as often as" and "till he come", indicates that no other memorial will be given. Hence the Easter celebration, which basically celebrates the same thing, finds itself as an addition to the Scriptures. (2 John 1:9)

Therefore, a congregation that doesn"t offer the Lord"s Supper "often" (Acts 20:7); or offers it, but members don"t partake (Jehovah Witnesses), doesn"t "proclaim" the Lord"s death.

"till he come"-

"SO HE DIDN"T STAY DEAD!)..It wasn"t a memorial to some "dear departed"" (McGuiggan p. 159) In addition, "till he come" suggests that the Lord"s Supper includes a remembrance of His resurrection and Second Coming also. For without either event, His death becomes rather meaningless.

Note: The bread and the cup TOGETHER signify the Lord"s death.

THE ANSWER-DISCERN THE BODY:


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Bibliography
Dunagan, Mark. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 11:26". "Mark Dunagan Commentaries on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dun/1-corinthians-11.html. 1999-2014.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

shew = proclaim. App-121.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 11:26". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/1-corinthians-11.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

For as often as ye eat this bread, and drink this cup, ye do shew the Lord's death till he come.

For - in proof that the Lord's supper is "in remembrance" of Him.

Show - announce publicly [ katangellete (Greek #2605)]; not dramatically represent, but 'publicly profess each of you, the Lord died FOR ME' Wahl). Paul means, not literal presence, but vivid personal appropriation by faith of Christ crucified in the Lord's supper (Ephesians 5:30 : cf. Genesis 2:23): realizing that we ourselves are "members of His body, of His flesh, and of His bones," 'our sinful bodies made clan by His body (once for all offered), and our souls washed through His most precious blood' ('Church of England Prayer Book'). "Show," or 'announce,' applies to new things (cf. Exodus 13:8). So the Lord's death, and all the saving blessings resulting from it, ought always to be fresh in our memory (cf. in heaven, Revelation 5:6). That the Lord's supper is in remembrance of Him, implies that He is bodily absent, though spiritually present; for we cannot 'commemorate' one absent. Our not only showing the Lord's death, but eating and drinking the pledges of it, could only be understood by the Jews, accustomed to feasts af ter propitiatory sacrifices, as implying our personal appropriation of the benefits of that death.

Till he come - when there shall be no longer need of symbols, the body itself being manifested. The Greek [no, an (Greek #302), before elthee (Greek #2064)] expresses the certainty of His coming. Rome teaches that we eat Christ present corporally "until He come" corporally!-a contradiction in terms. The showbread, literally, bread of the presence, was in the sanctuary, but not in the Holiest place (Hebrews 9:1-8); so the Lord's super shall be superseded in heaven, the antitype to the Holiest place, by Christ's own bodily presence: then the wine shall be drunk "anew" in the Father's kingdom by Christ and His people together, of which heavenly banquet the Lord's supper is a spiritual foretaste (Matthew 26:29; Revelation 19:9). Meantime, as the showbread was placed anew every Sabbath on the table before the Lord (Leviticus 24:5-8), so the Lord's death was shown (announced afresh) at the Lord's table the first day of every week in the primitive Church. We are now "priests unto God" in the dispensation of Christ's spiritual presence, antitypical of the HOLY PLACE: the perfect dispensation to come when Christ shall come is antitypical to the HOLIEST PLACE. Christ our High Priest alone in the flesh as yet has entered the Heavenly Holiest (Hebrews 9:6-7; Hebrews 12:24); at his coming, believers too shall enter (Revelation 7:15; Revelation 21:22). The super joins the consummations of the Old and New dispensations. The first and second comings are two phase of one coming; whence the expression is not 'return,' but "come" (cf., however, John 14:3).


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 11:26". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/1-corinthians-11.html. 1871-8.

The Bible Study New Testament

For until the Lord comes. Christians are to share in the Lord's Supper (Holy Meal) PERPETUALLY until Jesus comes and the dead are raised to life! You proclaim his death. Christ on the cross is the center of Christianity (see note on 1 Corinthians 1:23). The bread symbolizes his body of flesh; the fruit of the grape symbolizes his blood.


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Bibliography
Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 11:26". "The Bible Study New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/1-corinthians-11.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(26) For as often as ye . . .—The previous verse concluded the account of the institution as conveyed by Christ to St. Paul, and the Apostle himself now again speaks. All this being the true account of the origin of this Supper, as often as you eat this bread and drink this cup (as distinct from other bread and wine) you proclaim the Lord’s death until He come. The Greek word for “ye show” is that used for making a public oral proclamation. The passage does not imply, as some have suggested, that the Lord’s Supper “was a living sermon or an acted discourse,” but, as is still the custom, that when the bread and wine were consecrated to this sacred use, there was an oral declaration made (perhaps in the very words the Apostle here used, 1 Corinthians 11:22-25) of the facts of the original institution. The imperative form given in the margin of the Authorised version is quite inadmissible.

In the pathetic words “until He come” we may find an expression of the belief, perhaps largely due to the hope, that the Second Advent was not far distant.


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 11:26". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/1-corinthians-11.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

For as often as ye eat this bread, and drink this cup, ye do shew the Lord's death till he come.
ye do shew
or, shew ye. till.
4:5; 15:23; John 14:3; 21:22; Acts 1:11; 1 Thessalonians 4:16; 2 Thessalonians 1:10; 2:2,3; Hebrews 9:28; 2 Peter 3:10; 1 John 2:28; Jude 1:14; Revelation 1:7; 20:11,12; 22:20

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 11:26". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/1-corinthians-11.html.

Hodge's Commentary on Romans, Ephesians and First Corintians

For as often as ye eat this bread, and drink this cup, ye do shew the Lord's death till he come.

What Paul had received of the Lord is recorded in the preceding verses. Here and in what follows we have his own inferences from the account which the Lord had given him. The first of those inferences is, that the Lord's supper is, and was designed to be, a proclamation of the death of Christ to continue until his second advent. Those who come to it, therefore, should come, not to satisfy hunger, nor for the gratification of social feelings, but for the definite purpose of bearing their testimony to the great fact of redemption, and to contribute their portion of influence to the preservation and propagation of the knowledge of that fact. For indicates the connection with what precedes. ‘It is a commemoration of his death, for it is in its very nature a proclamation of that great fact.' And it was not a temporary institution, but one designed to continue until the consummation. As the Passover was a perpetual commemoration of the deliverance out of Egypt, and a prediction of the coming and death of the Lamb of God, who was to bear the sins of the world; so the Lord's supper is at once the commemoration of the death of Christ and a pledge of his coming the second time without sin unto salvation.


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Bibliography
Hodge, Charles. "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 11:26". Hodge's Commentary on Romans, Ephesians and First Corintians. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hdg/1-corinthians-11.html.

: For as often as ye eat this bread, and drink the cup, ye proclaim the Lord's death till he come.

The word "proclaim" (katangello) is translated "shew" in the KJV. Good definitions for this word are "proclaim" or "announce." While other passages use proclaim to describe preaching ( Acts 4:2; Acts 13:5; Acts 15:36; Acts 17:3; 1 Corinthians 9:14; Colossians 1:28), here the proclamation involves Jesus "death." It is as if Christians announce the death of Jesus every time they partake of the Lord's Supper. Since proclaim is a present tense verb, the Lord's Supper is a continual proclamation of the fact that Jesus came and paid the full price for man's sins. Gromacki (p143) correctly noted how the "Lord's Supper is not a sacrificial presentation to God; rather, it is a visible proclamation of the gospel message to men." This story not only needs to be retold, it needs to be retold every single week and God allows this to be done by every single Christian: Male, female, the married, single, young, old, etc.

Because this proclamation is carried out each Sunday, at least four points of application may be made. (1) God's people should not miss Sunday assemblies unless they have a good reason for doing so. (2) We should come to worship with a sense of anticipation and joy instead of regarding worship as a "duty." (3) The Lord's Supper is a rather unique mix of sorrow and joy. Lee Strobel (The Case For Christ, p342) said: "If a group of people loved John F. Kennedy, they might meet regularly to remember his confrontation with Russia, his promotion of civil rights, and his charismatic personality. But they're not going to celebrate the fact that Lee Harvey Oswald murdered him." The Communion skillfully blends together joy and sadness. (4) There is a sense in which the Lord's Supper helps teach people who Jesus is and what He did on the cross.

At the beginning of this verse Paul said "as often" (hosakis). This "assures the believer that each time he partakes in the Lord's Supper, he again and anew ‘shows' or ‘declares' his remembrance of the death of the Lord" (CBL, GED, ). Since Jesus' death is central to the salvation of man (compare John 3:16), it is incomprehensible to this author how Bible believing people can attend worship every Sunday and claim to honor Jesus but not partake of the memorial that commemorates the heart of the Christian faith (compare 1 Corinthians 15:1-4). Paul also would not have understood observing the Communion less frequently than once a week because "eat" and "drink" are both present tense verbs.

The ASV, KJV, NKJV, RSV and NASB all translate the first part of verse26 with the words "as often." The NIV says "whenever." While the NIV rendering may not necessarily lead people to believe they can observe the Lord's Supper at an interval they choose, this translation certainly seems to give more leeway in this regard and it may mislead some readers into thinking the Communion does not need to be a part of every Sunday worship.

When the Lord's Supper is observed, Christians are to use the bread and the cup. This tells us Christians are to partake of both items (the Corinthians did not have the cup withheld from them). Today, any religious group that does not distribute both the bread and the cup, or tries to limit the Supper to certain people, does not please God. The need to partake of both the cup and the bread is also seen in verse27. This part of the verse also tells us that God has specified what we are to use for the Communion elements. Some might prefer a hamburger and a milkshake instead of bread and the fruit of the vine, but we do not have God's authorization for using other things (compare Colossians 3:17).

The Lord death is to be proclaimed "till he come." This statement tells us the Communion is associated with the future; Christians will observe this activity until Jesus finally returns. The Lord's Supper is also associated with the present and the past. It is tied to the past because Jesus died more than2 ,000 years ago. The Communion includes the present because it reminds Christians of their continual cleansing from sin ( 1 John 1:7) and the fact that all live under the New Testament that was sealed with Jesus' blood (verse25).

After Jesus returns, the world is destroyed ( 2 Peter 3:10-12), and the saved are in God's presence for eternity ( 1 Thessalonians 4:17), there will be no need to "remember" Jesus (verse25). We do not need to be "reminded" of someone if we are in his presence. Until this time comes, Christians do need the Lord's Supper as a weekly reminder of what Jesus did so we must worship in a place where the Communion is offered every Sunday. If the place where we worship does not have the Lord's Supper every Sunday, we need to find or start a congregation of the New Testament church (this subject is discussed at the end of this commentary).

The Bible has much to say about the future coming of Jesus. Jesus has promised to return ( Matthew 24:37) and heaven's angels are waiting for this day ( Acts 1:10-11). Jesus will come at a time that cannot be predicted ( Matthew 24:36) and people will not be expecting Him ( 1 Thessalonians 5:2). Although the Lord's return will surprise people ( 1 Thessalonians 5:2-3), people will know what is taking place because the event will be audible ( 1 Thessalonians 4:16) and all heaven's angels will be with Him ( Matthew 25:31). All the dead will be raised ( John 5:28-29), the final judgment will occur ( Acts 17:31), the saved and the unsaved will be eternally separated one from another ( Matthew 25:46), and the physical world and universe will be destroyed ( Hebrews 1:10-12). At this time there will never again be a need for people to partake of the Lord's Supper.


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Bibliography
Price, Brad "Commentary on 1 Corinthians 11:26". "Living By Faith: Commentary on Romans". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bpc/1-corinthians-11.html.


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