Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

1 Kings 12:26

Jeroboam said in his heart, "Now the kingdom will return to the house of David.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Beth-El;   Church and State;   Jeroboam;   Religion;   Rulers;   Statecraft;   Thompson Chain Reference - Jeroboam;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Calves of Jeroboam;   Offence;   Sins, National;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Calf;   Rehoboam;   Shechem;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Israel;   Jeroboam;   Jerusalem;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - King, Kingship;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Aholah;   Baasha;   Calf Worship;   Feasts;   Rama;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Golden Calf;   Jeroboam;   Kings, 1 and 2;   Transportation and Travel;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Aaron;   Bethel;   Calf, Golden;   Israel;   Priests and Levites;   Rehoboam,;   Solomon;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Rehoboam ;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Beth-aven;   Calf;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Kings;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Idolatry,;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Jeroboam;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Kingdom of Israel;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Calf, Golden;   Temple;  

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Jeroboam‘s fear was lest a reaction should set in, and a desire for reunion manifest itself. He was not a man content to remain quiet, trusting simply to the promise made him 1 Kings 11:38. Hence, he gave way to the temptation of helping forward the plans of Providence by the crooked devices of a merely human policy. His measures, like all measures which involve a dereliction of principle, brought certain evils in their train, and drew down divine judgment on himself. But they fully secured the object at which he aimed. They prevented all healing of the breach between the two kingdoms. They made the separation final. They produced the result that not only no reunion took place, but no symptoms of an inclination to reunite ever manifested themselves during the whole period of the double kingdom.

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Bibliographical Information
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on 1 Kings 12:26". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/1-kings-12.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And Jeroboam said in his heart, As he was musing about the state of his kingdom and the affairs of it:

now shall the kingdom return to the house of David; such were his fears, unless some method could be taken to prevent it, particularly with respect to religion, which was what his thoughts were employed about.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 1 Kings 12:26". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/1-kings-12.html. 1999.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And Jeroboam said in his heart, Now shall the kingdom return to the house of David:

Said, … — Reasoned within himself. The phrase discovers the fountain of his error, that he did not consult with God, who had given him the kingdom; as in all reason, and justice, and gratitude he should have done: nor believed God's promise, chap11:38, but his own carnal policy.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on 1 Kings 12:26". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/1-kings-12.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

1 Kings 12:26 And Jeroboam said in his heart, Now shall the kingdom return to the house of David:

Ver. 26. And Jeroboam said in his heart.] His kingdom was not without cares, his throne without thorns: for help in which case, he consulteth with carnal reason, and thereby "consulteth shame and ruin to his house, and sinneth against his own soul." [Zephaniah 2:10]

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Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on 1 Kings 12:26". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/1-kings-12.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Said in his heart, i.e. reasoned within himself: The phrase discovers the fountain of his error, that he did not consult with God, who had given him the kingdom; as in all reason, and justice, and gratitude he should have done; nor believed God’s promise, 1 Kings 11:38; but his own imaginations and carnal policies.

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These files are public domain.
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Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 1 Kings 12:26". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/1-kings-12.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

26.Jeroboam said in his heart — He earnestly soliloquized. The expression implies deep thought, and profound, far-sighted consideration. He not only thoroughly considered the subject within himself, but he also took counsel with his most intimate and interested advisers. He did not wish nor design to introduce heathenish idolatry into his kingdom, but he was apprehensive that if all his people went up to Jerusalem to worship their hearts would soon revolt from him, and turn to the government of Rehoboam. So the making of new sanctuaries at Bethel and Dan, the institution of the calf-worship, and the establishment of a new priesthood, were undertaken, not with the design of countenancing idolatry, but professedly as modifications and reforms in the true worship of God demanded by the changed circumstances of the kingdom. They were dictated by a shrewd state-policy; not by the word of God. They were probably presented to the people as improvements on the temple worship, for it was not to be expected that a people so long accustomed to the worship of the invisible Jehovah, though they might have felt ever so bitter towards the government at Jerusalem, would consent to any semblance of idol-worship unless it were presented with a plausible show of argument. And doubtless the proposed reforms, when first presented to the people, lacked no show of reason. It was urged that it was too much for all the people to go to Jerusalem, (1 Kings 12:28,) and that the division of the old kingdom, which was of the Lord, (1 Kings 12:15; 1 Kings 12:24,) required some corresponding changes in the place and modes of Divine worship.

Jeroboam might have maintained, with a skill worthy of the ratiocination of modern German Neology, that there was nothing in the place itself that need lead them to worship solely at Jerusalem, for Shiloh, Nob, and Gibeon had been sanctuaries before it was chosen; that the changing of the priesthood from one set of persons to another had a sufficient precedent in Solomon’s deposition of Abiathar, (1 Kings 2:27;) and that the setting up of the golden calves was not in itself wrong, but had the sanction of the blessed Aaron’s example, who set up one at Sinai, and taught the people to look upon it, not as an idol, but as a symbol of the Lord that brought them out of Egypt. Exodus 32:4-5. But just here was Jeroboam’s sin — a one-sided construction and use of the facts of sacred history, and an arrogant assumption to improve the religious worship of the nation by most dangerous methods, that had no proper sanction from Jehovah or his prophets. He may be regarded as a type of the Romish hierarchy, which, in its efforts to bind the people to St. Peter’s chair, has verily set up graven images in connexion with its worship, and assuming to represent the sanctities of a holy antiquity, has, in fact, reproduced the forms of heathen idolatry. “The sin of Jeroboam the son of Nebat,” says Stanley, “is the sin again and again repeated in the policy (half-worldly, half-religious) which has prevailed through large tracts of ecclesiastical history. Many are the forms of worship in the Christian Church, which, with high pretensions, have been nothing else but ‘so many various and opposite ways of breaking the second commandment.’ Many a time has the end been held to justify the means, and the Divine character been degraded by the pretence, or even the sincere intention, of upholding his cause; for the sake of secular aggrandizement; for the sake of binding together good systems, which, it was feared, would otherwise fall to pieces; for the sake of supporting the faith of the multitude from the fear lest they should fall away to rival sects, or lest the enemy should come and take away their place and nation. False arguments have been used in support of religious truth, false miracles promulgated or tolerated, false readings in the sacred text defended. And so the faith of mankind has been undermined by the very means intended to preserve it.”

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Bibliographical Information
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 1 Kings 12:26". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/1-kings-12.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

1 Kings 12:26. Jeroboam said in his heart — Reasoned within himself. The sacred historian shows, by this phrase, the fountain of his error, that he did not consult God, who had given him the kingdom, as in all reason, and justice, and gratitude, he ought to have done; nor believed in and relied on God’s promises, 1 Kings 11:38, but on his own carnal policy. God had told him he would build him a sure house, if he would walk in his ways and keep his statutes, yet he could not depend on this, but, agreeably to the propensity of his fallen nature, studied to establish his throne by his own wisdom, and so brought evil upon himself, and introduced an idolatry into his kingdom which in the end proved its ruin.

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These files are public domain.
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Bibliographical Information
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on 1 Kings 12:26". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/1-kings-12.html. 1857.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And Jeroboam said in his heart, Now shall the kingdom return to the house of David:

Jeroboam said in his heart. Having received the kingdom from God, he should have relied on the divine protection. But he did not. With a view to withdraw the people from the temple, and destroy the sacred associations connected with Jerusalem, he made serious and unwarranted innovations on the religious observances of the country, on pretext of saving the people the trouble and expense of a distant journey.

First, He erected two golden calves [ `eegel (Hebrew #5695) (see the notes at Exodus 32:4; Exodus 32:8); Septuagint, damaleis chrusas] - the young bulls Apis and Mnevis, as symbols, in the Egyptian fashion, of the true God. Monceau says Jeroboam made them the nearest, according to his fancy, to the figures of the cherubim. The one was placed at Dan [considered a sacred place from the time of Micah (Judges 17:1-13); and to this day the worship of the calf enters into the sacred rites of the Dress saints in that neighbourhood (Newbold, 'Journal of Asiatic Society,' vol. 16:, p. 27)], in the northern part of his kingdom; the other at Beth-el [also venerable for its hallowed associations (Genesis 28:1-22), and recommended from its proximity to the passes which both on the west and east, led into the central mountain chain of the country (see Michaelis, 'Commentary-on the Laws of Moses,' b. 5:, article 245; Hengstenberg's 'Christology'-Preliminary Observations on Hosea)], the southern extremity, in sight of Jerusalem, and in which place he probably thought God was as likely to manifest Himself as at Jerusalem (Genesis 32:1-32; 2 Kings 2:2). The latter place, called afterward Beth-aven, was the most frequented; because the words, 1 Kings 12:30, should be rendered, 'the people, even to Dan, went to worship before the one' (Jeremiah 48:13; Amos 4:4-5; Amos 5:5; Hosea 5:8; Hosea 10:8). This innovation was a sin; because through Jeroboam did not give any formal intimation of his purpose to renounce the worship of Yahweh, it was setting up the worship of God by symbols and images, and departing from the place which he had chosen to put His name there.

Secondly, He changed the feast of tabernacles from the 15th of the seventh month to the 15th of the eighth mouth. The ostensible reason might be, that the ingathering, or harvest, was later in the northern parts of the kingdom; but the real reason was to eradicate the old associations with this, the most welcome and joyous festival of the year.

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Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 1 Kings 12:26". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/1-kings-12.html. 1871-8.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And Jeroboam said in his heart, Now shall the kingdom return to the house of David:
said in his heart
Psalms 14:1; Mark 2:6-8; Luke 7:39
Now shall
11:38; 1 Samuel 27:1; 2 Chronicles 20:20; Isaiah 7:9; Jeremiah 38:18-21; John 11:47-50; John 12:10,11,19; Acts 4:16,17
Reciprocal: 1 Samuel 13:12 - said I:1 Samuel 16:6 - Surely;  1 Kings 13:34 - to cut it off;  1 Kings 16:26 - he walked;  2 Kings 3:3 - he departed;  2 Kings 13:2 - followed;  Psalm 53:1 - said;  Ezekiel 23:4 - Aholah;  Hosea 5:3 - thou;  Hosea 5:11 - he willingly;  Hosea 13:11 - General

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 1 Kings 12:26". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/1-kings-12.html.