Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

1 Kings 14:25

Now it happened in the fifth year of King Rehoboam, that Shishak the king of Egypt came up against Jerusalem.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Egyptians;   Israel, Prophecies Concerning;   Jerusalem;   Rehoboam;   Shishak;   Temple;   Thompson Chain Reference - Israel;   Jerusalem;   Jews;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Egypt;   Jerusalem;   Kings;   Temple, the First;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Ammon, or No-Ammon, or No;   Pharaoh;   Rehoboam;   Shishak;   Temple;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Egypt;   Temple;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Egypt;   Kings, First and Second, Theology of;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Egypt;   Obadiah, Book of;   Rehoboam;   Shishak I;   Temple, Solomon's;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Alliances;   Jerusalem;   Kings, the Books of;   No;   Rehoboam;   Shishak;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Archaeology and Biblical Study;   Ark of the Covenant;   Arms and Armor;   Beth-Shean;   Egypt;   Jerusalem;   Jewels, Jewelry;   Libya;   Pharaoh;   Shishak;   Temple of Jerusalem;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Abijah;   Israel;   Jerusalem;   Shishak;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Egypt;   Rehoboam ;   Shishak ;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Egypt;   Jerusalem;   Temple;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Shi'shak,;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Chronology of the Old Testament;   David;   Dispersion, the;   Egypt;   Jeroboam;   Judah, Kingdom of;   Pharaoh;   Rehoboam;   Shishak;   Taanach;   Temple;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Ammon, Ammonites;   Jeroboam;   Jonah, Book of;  

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

The examination of the famous inscription of Shishak at Karnak has resulted in the proof that the expedition commemorated was directed against Palestine, and has further thrown a good deal of light on the relations of the two kingdoms at the period. Of the fifteen fenced cities fortified by Rehoboam in the early part of his reign 2 Chronicles 11:5-12, three, Shoco, Adoraim, and Aijalon are distinctly mentioned among Shishak‘s conquests. Other towns of Judah or Benjamin also occur. Further, a considerable number of the captured cities are in the territory of Jeroboam: these cities “are either Canaanite or Levitical.” Hence, we gather, that, during the four years which immediately followed the separation of the kingdoms, Rehoboam retained a powerful hold on the dominions of his rival, many Canaanite and Levitical towns acknowledging his sovereignty, and maintaining themselves against Jeroboam, who probably called in Shishak mainly to assist him in compelling these cities to submission. The campaign was completely successful.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on 1 Kings 14:25". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/1-kings-14.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

REHOBOAM MADE SHIELDS OF BRASS TO REPLACE THE LOST SHIELDS OF GOLD

"And it came to pass in the fifth year of king Rehoboam, that Shishak king of Egypt came up against Jerusalem; and he took away the treasures of the house of Jehovah, and the treasures of the king's house; he even took away all: and he took away all the shields of gold that Solomon had made. And king Rehoboam made in their place shields of brass, and committed them to the hands of the captain of the guard, who kept the door of the king's house. And it was so, that, as off as the king went into the house of Jehovah, the guard bare them, and brought them back into the guard chamber."

This tragic loss of the golden shields of Solomon was a physical disaster that was, in a sense, an eloquent parable of what had already happened spiritually in Israel. Their golden shields of trust in God and faithfulness to his word they had exchanged for high places and their Asherim and their pillars with their vulgar and licentious ceremonies.

AMERICA TODAY SHOULD KEEP OUR SHIELDS OF GOLD WHILE WE STILL HAVE THEM

These golden shields are our faith in God, our Christian value judgments, the sanctity of marriage, the dignity of honest labor, the faithful worship of God, Biblical morality, honesty, sobriety, chastity, truthfulness, individual responsibility, and faith in the Bible. Like the golden shields of Rehoboam, we did not create these wonderful blessings. We inherited them from our ancestors who came to America, primarily to find a place to worship God after the manner of their own convictions in the light of the Word of God. When the forty-eight contiguous states of our country were founded, forty-seven of them, according to Dean Clarence Manion, Head of the College of Law at Notre Dame University, incorporated the Decalogue into their state constitutions.

Like poor, wicked Rehoboam, we have our own Shishaks determined to take away our shields of gold - all of them. In place of the sacredness of our homes, they would give us endless divorces, homosexual debauchery as an "alternate" lifestyle, immoral cohabitation of the unwed, abandoned and abused children, and pitiful teenage parents. In place of our faith in God, they would give us faith in nothing, mistrust, hopelessness and despair. In place of the Biblical morality they would give us the degenerate shame of vulgar licentiousness. In place of the sanctity of human life, they would give us the aborted fetuses of millions of unborn human beings. In place of the worship of God, they offer us the worthless entertainment of all kinds of bowls, stadiums, domes and fields! In place of our faith in the Bible, we are offered the speculative nonsense of critics who do not believe it.

We may be certain that if we are foolish enough to trade in our inheritance for what is offered us instead, that we shall find in it no more satisfaction than the Israelites found in their shields of brass! May God open the eyes of America! For further comments regarding the Golden Shield which Americans know as "our government," see Vol. 6 (Romans) of our N.T. commentaries, pp. 435,436.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on 1 Kings 14:25". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/1-kings-14.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And it came to pass in the fifth year of King Rehoboam,.... Two years after he and his people fell into the above wicked practices:

that Shishak, king of Egypt came up against Jerusalem; of whom see 1 Kings 11:40, this was suffered as a chastisement from the Lord for their abominations.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 1 Kings 14:25". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/1-kings-14.html. 1999.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And it came to pass in the fifth year of king Rehoboam, that Shishak king of Egypt came up against Jerusalem:

Fifth year — Presently after his and his people's apostacy, which was not 'till his fourth year: while apostate, Israel enjoyed peace and some kind of prosperity, of which difference, two reasons may be given: first, Judah's sins were committed against clearer light, and more powerful means and remedies of all sorts, and therefore deserved more severe and speedy judgments. Secondly, God discovered more love to Judah in chastizing them speedily, that they might be humbled, reformed, and preserved, as it happened; and more anger against Israel, whom he spared to that total destruction which he intended to bring upon them.

Sishak — He is thought to be Solomon's brother-in-law. But how little such relations signify among princes, when their interest is concerned, all histories witness. Besides Rehoboam was not Solomon's son by Pharaoh's daughter and so the relation was in a manner extinct.

Came up — Either, from a desire to enlarge his empire: or, by Jeroboam's instigation: or from a covetous desire of possessing those great treasures which David and Solomon had left: and above all, by God's providence, disposing his heart to this expedition for Rehoboam's punishment.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on 1 Kings 14:25". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/1-kings-14.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

1 Kings 14:25 And it came to pass in the fifth year of king Rehoboam, [that] Shishak king of Egypt came up against Jerusalem:

Ver. 25. Shishak king of Egypt.] Diodorus Siculus calleth him Sasokis; Justin, Susakis.

Came up.] Drawn by a desire of Solomon’s ivory throne, say some; like as the pearls usually cast out with the flood and gathered with the ebb, drew Caesar’s affection for the conquest of Britain. (a)

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on 1 Kings 14:25". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/1-kings-14.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

1 Kings 14:25. Shishak, king of Egypt It may seem something strange, that Shishak, who was so nearly allied to Rehoboam, should come up against him and take his royal city; but Rehoboam, we must remember, was not the son of Pharaoh's daughter, and therefore no relation to Shishak. But even had he been never so nearly related, as kingdoms, we know, never marry; so it is likely that Jeroboam, who had lived long in Egypt, stirred up Shishak to invade his rival, that he might thereby establish himself in his new kingdom: and it was for this reason, that when the armies of Egypt had taken the fenced cities of Judah, they returned without giving Jeroboam, or his dominions, the least disturbance. See Bishop Patrick.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on 1 Kings 14:25". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/1-kings-14.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

In the fifth year of king Rehoboam; presently after his and his people’s apostacy, which was not till his fourth year; when the apostical Israelites enjoyed peace and some kind of prosperity, at first, for many years together; of which difference two reasons may be given: first, That Judah’s sins were committed against clearer light, and more powerful means and remedies of all sorts, and therefore deserved more severe and speed judgments. Secondly, that God discovered more love to Judah in chastising them speedily, that so they might be humbled, and reformed, and so graciously preserved, as it happened; and more anger against Israel, that he spared them, and by their impunity hardened and ripened them to that total destruction which he intend ed to bring upon them.

Shishak king of Egypt; of whom see 1 Kings 11:40 2 Chronicles 12:2, &c., where this history is more fully described. He is thought by many to be Solomon’s brother-in-law. But how little such relations signify among princes, when their interest is concerned, all histories witness. Besides, Rehoboam was not Solomon’s son by Pharaoh’s daughter, and so the relation was in a manner extinct.

Came up against Jerusalem; either from ambition, and a desire to enlarge his empire; or from jealousy of Rehoboam’s growing greatness; of which see 2Ch 11; or by Jeroboam’s instigation; or from a covetous desire of possessing these great treasures which David and Solomon had left; and, above all, by God’s providence, disposing his heart to this expedition for Rehoboam’s punishment.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 1 Kings 14:25". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/1-kings-14.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

25.Shishak — See note on 1 Kings 11:40.

Came up against Jerusalem — This notice of Shishak’s invasion is very brief, and records only his going to Jerusalem and taking away the treasures of the temple and the palace. 2 Chronicles 12:2-10 more fully describes the invasion, tells the number and nationality of his forces, informs us that he took certain fortified cities of Judah, and that when he came to Jerusalem the king and princes of Israel, at the word of the prophet Jeremiah, humbled themselves before God, and were thus by the hand of God delivered from utter destruction. Rehoboam seems to have submitted to the Egyptian invader without a struggle, and to have delivered over his treasures and become tributary to Egypt on condition that the besieging forces should retire from before Jerusalem. A record of this expedition, and thus a confirmation of the Scripture history, is found written in hieroglyphics upon the wall of the great temple of Karnak. There, in a long list of captured cities and provinces which Shishak claims to have added to his dominions, occur the names Gibeon, Beth-horon, Aijalon, and Yudeh-malk, which Champollion, Wilkinson, and others read kingdom of Judah, but Brugsch regards it as the name of a town in Palestine.

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 1 Kings 14:25". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/1-kings-14.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

1 Kings 14:25. In the fifth year of King Rehoboam — Presently after his and his people’s apostacy, which was not till his fourth year; while apostate Israel enjoyed peace, and some kind of prosperity; of which difference two reasons may be given: first, Judah’s sins were committed against clearer light, and more powerful means and remedies of all sorts, and therefore deserved more severe and speedy judgments. Secondly, God discovered more love to Judah in chastising them speedily, that they might be humbled, reformed, and preserved, as it happened; and more anger against Israel, whom he spared to that total destruction which he intended to bring upon them. Shishak — He is thought to be Solomon’s brother-in-law; but how little such relations signify among princes, when their interest is concerned, all histories witness: besides, Rehoboam was not Solomon’s son by Pharaoh’s daughter, and so the relation was in a manner extinct. Came up — Either from a desire to enlarge his empire; or by Jeroboam’s instigation; or from a covetous desire of possessing those great treasures which David and Solomon had left; and, above all, by God’s providence disposing his heart to this expedition, for Rehoboam’s punishment.

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on 1 Kings 14:25". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/1-kings-14.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Sesac. See chap. xi. 40. He was allied to Jeroboam, (Calmet) so that he might come to his assistance, (Haydock) being attracted by the ivory throne, (Rabbins) and immense riches of Jeroboam. (Calmet) --- Roboam was informed by Semeias, that resistance would be fruitless; and being humbled, he repaired more frequently to the temple, ver. 18. But his piety was of short duration, as it was influenced only by fear, 2 Paralipomenon xii. 14.

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on 1 Kings 14:25". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/1-kings-14.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Shishak. Founder of the twenty-second dynasty.

against. See note on Judges 1:8, and App-53.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 1 Kings 14:25". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/1-kings-14.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And it came to pass in the fifth year of king Rehoboam, that Shishak king of Egypt came up against Jerusalem:

Shishak king of Egypt came up. He was the instrument in the hand of Providence for punishing the national defection. He was the first member of the 22nd dynasty, (see the notes at 2 Chronicles 12:1-16) - the Sh-sh-k of the Egyptian monuments. He was the Sesonchis of the Greek lists. [The Septuagint calls him: Sousakim.] Champollion discovered in one of the palaces at Thebes the Egyptian name of this king in a cartouche or hieroglyphic oval, and a figure representing a prisoner, with his hands bound behind his back, with an unmistakeably Jewish physiognomy, and with this inscription in the oval-Judah Melek kah, 'king of the country of Judah' (Champollion, 'Tab.,' 76; Gliddon's 'Ancient Egypt,' p. 9; 'Egyptian Court' (Crystal Palace), p. 33; Browne's 'Ordo Saeclorum,' sec. 513; Osburn's 'Mon. Hist.,' 2: pp. 99, 599). The names of Shishak and his successors of this dynasty are frequently found among the monumental ruins of Bubastis, in the east of the Delta, which they made their capital (Wilkinson's 'Ancient Egyptians,' 2:, pp. 428, 429).

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 1 Kings 14:25". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/1-kings-14.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(25) Shishak.—His invasion is narrated at greater length in the record of Chronicles (2 Chronicles 12:2-12), which contains a description of his army, and a notice of the preservation of Jerusalem from destruction, though not from surrender, on the repentance of the people at the call of Shemaiah. It records also the taking of “fenced cities,” having noticed previously the fortifications of many such “cities of defence” by Rehoboam (2 Chronicles 11:5-10). This record is remarkably confirmed by the celebrated inscription at Karnak (see Dict. of the Bible: “SHISHAK”) enumerating the conquests of Sheshenk (Shishak), in which names of cities, partly in Judah, partly in Israel, are traced. The latter are Levitical or Canaanitish cities; and it has been conjectured that, much as the Pharaoh of Solomon’s day took Gezer and gave it to Israel (see 1 Kings 9:16), so the Egyptian army, coming as allies of Jeroboam, took, or helped him to take, those cities which were hostile or disloyal to him. It is not unlikely that the whole invasion was instigated by Jeroboam, in that desire to crush the kingdom of Judah which afterwards suggested his war with Abijam. (See 2 Chronicles 13)

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on 1 Kings 14:25". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/1-kings-14.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And it came to pass in the fifth year of king Rehoboam, that Shishak king of Egypt came up against Jerusalem:
A. M. 3034. B.C. 970. Shishak
11:40; 2 Chronicles 12:2-4
Reciprocal: 1 Kings 11:39 - afflict;  2 Chronicles 12:9 - Shishak;  Psalm 89:44 - Thou;  Ecclesiastes 2:19 - who knoweth

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 1 Kings 14:25". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/1-kings-14.html.