Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

1 Kings 3:15

Then Solomon awoke, and behold, it was a dream. And he came to Jerusalem and stood before the ark of the covenant of the Lord, and offered burnt offerings and made peace offerings, and made a feast for all his servants.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Dream;   Solomon;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Dreams;   Peace-Offerings;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Gibeon;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Kings, First and Second, Theology of;   Wisdom;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Gibeon;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Burnt Offering;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Kings, 1 and 2;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Israel;   King;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Worldliness (2);   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Dream;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Hebrew Monarchy, the;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Ark of the Covenant;   Awake;   Divide;   Dream;   Intercession;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Ark of the Covenant;   Dreams;  

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Solomon determined to inaugurate his reign by a grand religious ceremonial at each of the two holy places which at this time divided between them the reverence of the Jews. Having completed the religious service at Gibeon, where was the tabernacle of the congregation, he proceeded to Jerusalem, and sacrificed before the ark of the covenant, which was in Mount Zion 2 Samuel 6:12. A great feast naturally followed on a large sacrifice of peace-offerings. In these the sacrificer always partook of the flesh of the victim, and he was commanded to call in to the feast the Levite, the stranger, the fatherless, and the widow Deuteronomy 14:29. Compare 2 Samuel 6:19; 1 Chronicles 16:3.

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Bibliographical Information
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on 1 Kings 3:15". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/1-kings-3.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And Solomon awoke, and, behold, it was a dream,.... Not that it was nothing but a dream, a natural one, a vain and empty one, but a divine and supernatural one, a dream of prophecy, as the Jews call it, or a prophetic dream; a true one, which had its fall accomplishment in him, the truth of which he perceived as soon as he awoke; for he found himself possessed of such a measure of wisdom and knowledge he never had before, which occasioned the thanksgiving and joy next expressed:

and he came to Jerusalem; from Gibeon, accompanied by his nobles and servants:

and stood before the ark of the covenant the Lord; which was in a tent David had pitched for it there, 2 Samuel 6:17; here he stood with holy reverence, as in the presence of the Lord, and as a servant of his, to minister to him, and as a worshipper of him, with a heart full of gratitude for the great things he had done for him, and promised to him:

and offered up burnt offerings, and offered peace offerings; by way of thankfulness for his quiet settlement in the for the Lord's appearance to him at Gibeon, and what he had already given, and promised to give:

and made a feast to all his servants; in a way of joy and gladness for the above layouts; this feast was either the part of the peace offerings he offered, which belonged to the offerer to eat with his friends, or this was a special feast made at his own palace for his courtiers.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 1 Kings 3:15". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/1-kings-3.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

And Solomon awoke; and, behold, [it was] i a dream. And he came to Jerusalem, and stood before the ark of the covenant of the LORD, and offered up burnt offerings, and offered peace offerings, and made a feast to all his servants.

(i) He knew that God had appeared to him in a dream.
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Bibliographical Information
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on 1 Kings 3:15". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/1-kings-3.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

behold, it was a dream — The vivid impression, the indelible recollection he had of this dream, together with the new and increased energy communicated to his mind, and the flow of worldly prosperity that rushed upon him, gave him assurance that it came by divine inspiration and originated in the grace of God. The wisdom, however, that was asked and obtained was not so much of the heart as of the head - it was wisdom not for himself personally, but for his office, such as would qualify him for the administration of justice, the government of a kingdom, and for the attainment of general scientific knowledge.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 1 Kings 3:15". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/1-kings-3.html. 1871-8.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

(15) And Solomon awoke; and, behold, it was a dream. And he came to Jerusalem, and stood before the ark of the covenant of the LORD, and offered up burnt offerings, and offered peace offerings, and made a feast to all his servants.

Reader! it is impossible to enter into the full apprehension of what the feelings of Solomon were, unless, like him, our own souls have known somewhat of the refreshments of grace. But oh! the mind of man is certainly furnished by its great Author, when in a state of regeneration, for such manifestations of divine love. The patriarch Jacob's history affordeth a most delightful instance of the kind. Genesis 28:11-18.

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Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on 1 Kings 3:15". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/1-kings-3.html. 1828.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And Solomon awoke; and, behold, it was a dream. And he came to Jerusalem, and stood before the ark of the covenant of the LORD, and offered up burnt offerings, and offered peace offerings, and made a feast to all his servants.

A dream — Not a vain dream, wherewith men are commonly deluded; but a divine dream, assuring him of the thing: which he knew, by a divine impression after he was awakened: and by the vast alteration which he presently found within himself in point of wisdom and knowledge.

The ark — Which was there in the city of David, 2 Samuel 6:17, before which he presented himself in a way of holy adoration.

Burnt offerings — Chiefly for the expiation of his and his peoples sin, through the blood of Christ, manifestly signified in these sacrifices.

Peace offerings — Solemnly to praise God for all his mercies, and especially for giving him quiet possession of the kingdom, and for his glorious appearance to him in the dream, and for the promise therein made to him, and the actual accomplishment of it.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on 1 Kings 3:15". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/1-kings-3.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

1 Kings 3:15 And Solomon awoke; and, behold, [it was] a dream. And he came to Jerusalem, and stood before the ark of the covenant of the LORD, and offered up burnt offerings, and offered peace offerings, and made a feast to all his servants.

Ver. 15. And behold it was a dream.] But a divine dream, very well worth the heeding. There are also dreams diabolical. Eusebius writeth that Simon Magus had his devils ονειροπομποι, by whom he caused people to dream great matters of him, and highly to admire him. That was a strange dream which Jerome (a) had, when he was not only reproved but beaten black and blue for reading Cicero rather than the Holy Scriptures; this voice being uttered, as he perfectly remembered, Ciceronianus es, non Christianus, - Thou art a better Ciceronian than Christian.

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Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on 1 Kings 3:15". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/1-kings-3.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

It was a dream, i.e. he perceived that it was a dream; not a vain dream, wherewith men are commonly deluded; but a Divine knew, dream, assuring him of the thing; which he partly by a Divine impression and inspiration thereof in his mind after he was awakened; and partly by the vast alteration which he presently found within himself in point of wisdom and knowledge.

The ark of the covenant of the Lord was there in the city of David, 2 Samuel 6:17, before which he presented himself in the way of holy ministration and adoration, which may be noted by the word stood. Or that word may note his abode there for some consider able time, as the offering of so many sacrifices required.

Offered up burnt-offerings, chiefly for the expiation of his and his people’s sins, through the blood of Christ, manifestly signified in these sacrifices.

And offered peace-offerings, solemnly to praise God for all his mercies, and especially for giving him a quiet and fixed possession of the kingdom, and for his glorious appearance to him in a dream, and for the great promise therein made to him, and the actual accomplishment of it since wrought in him.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 1 Kings 3:15". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/1-kings-3.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

15.Behold, it was a dream — Nevertheless it was a real Divine communication, given by inspiration of God. See note on 1 Kings 3:5.

Came to Jerusalem — The tabernacle was at Gibeon, the ark at Jerusalem, and Solomon’s going from the former to the latter place with sacrificial offerings was a most significant act, opening a new epoch in the history of Israelitish worship. It was, probably, the last public service of the kind at Gibeon, and so, in effect, was a public transfer of sacrificial worship from the wandering, unsettled tabernacle, to that divinely chosen spot where alone henceforth Jehovah would be pleased to accept the more public offerings and vows of Israel. See Deuteronomy 12:5. It also symbolized that coming hour when, under the “greater than Solomon,” all separation of tabernacle and ark would be forever past, and the true worshippers would advance from a cultus that made locality a test, to find their great altar in the inner temple of the spirit, and to worship the Father in spirit and in truth. John 4:21-24.

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 1 Kings 3:15". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/1-kings-3.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

1 Kings 3:15. Behold, it was a dream — He perceived that it was a dream; not a vain dream, such as those wherewith men are commonly deluded, but a divine dream, assuring him of the things promised, which he knew, by a divine impression, after he was awaked, and by the vast alteration which he presently found within himself in point of wisdom and knowledge. And stood before the ark — Which was there in the city of David, (2 Samuel 6:17,) before which he presented himself in a way of holy adoration. And offered up burnt-offerings — Chiefly for the expiation of his and his people’s sin, through the blood of Christ, manifestly signified in these sacrifices. And peace-offerings — Solemnly to praise God for all his mercies, and especially for giving him quiet possession of the kingdom, and for his glorious appearance to him in the dream, and for the promise therein made to him, and the actual accomplishment of it.

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Bibliographical Information
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on 1 Kings 3:15". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/1-kings-3.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Dream. Sent by God, as [in] Genesis xli. 1. (Calmet)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on 1 Kings 3:15". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/1-kings-3.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

offered = prepared. See App-43. Showing that the Ceremonial Law was in writing before the days of Solomon, and not a later production, as asserted and assumed by some.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 1 Kings 3:15". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/1-kings-3.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And Solomon awoke; and, behold, it was a dream. And he came to Jerusalem, and stood before the ark of the covenant of the LORD, and offered up burnt offerings, and offered peace offerings, and made a feast to all his servants.

Behold, it was a dream. The vivid impression, the indelible recollection he had of this dream, together with the new and increased energy communicated to his mind, and the flow of worldly prosperity that rushed upon him, gave him assurance that it came by divine inspiration, and originated in the grace of God. The wisdom, however, that was asked and obtained was not so much of the heart as the head; it was wisdom, not for himself personally, but for his office, such as would qualify him for the administration of justice, the government of a kingdom, and for the attainment of general scientific knowledge.

He came to Jerusalem, and stood before the ark of the covenant. This being the first act of public worship since his accession, and he being under strong religious impressions, it was thought expedient that he should celebrate the sacred rites not only at the old tabernacle in Gibeon, but also at the provisional sanctuary in Jerusalem.

And made a feast to all his servants, [ mishteh (Hebrew #4960), a drinking; Septuagint, poton, used in a vague sense for a feast (Esther 1:3; Esther 2:18; Esther 8:17)].

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Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 1 Kings 3:15". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/1-kings-3.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(15) Stood before the ark of the covenant, in its Tabernacle on Mount Sion, which now constituted a second, and probably still more sacred, place of worship. The great sacrifice—now distinctly a thank-offering, followed as usual by a sacred feast—is naturally repeated there.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on 1 Kings 3:15". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/1-kings-3.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And Solomon awoke; and, behold, it was a dream. And he came to Jerusalem, and stood before the ark of the covenant of the LORD, and offered up burnt offerings, and offered peace offerings, and made a feast to all his servants.
awoke
Genesis 41:7; Jeremiah 31:26
before
2 Samuel 6:17; 1 Chronicles 16:1,2
peace offerings
8:63,65; Leviticus 3:1-17; 7:11-19; 2 Samuel 6:18,19; 2 Chronicles 7:5,7-10; 30:22-26
a feast
Genesis 31:54; 40:20; Esther 1:3; Daniel 5:1; Mark 6:21
Reciprocal: Genesis 21:8 - feast;  Genesis 41:4 - So Pharaoh awoke;  1 Kings 8:1 - out of the city

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Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 1 Kings 3:15". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/1-kings-3.html.