Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

1 Samuel 28:16

Samuel said, "Why then do you ask me, since the Lord has departed from you and has become your adversary?
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - En-Dor;   Familiar Spirits;   Holy Spirit;   Necromancy;   Samuel;   Saul;   Sorcery;   Witchcraft;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Endor;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Samuel;   Saul, king of israel;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Descent into Hell (Hades);   Magic;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Divination;   Saul;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Divination and Magic;   Medium;   Samuel, Books of;   Urim and Thummim;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Death;   En-Dor;   Eschatology;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Descent into Hades;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Magic;   Saul;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Hebrew Monarchy, the;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - En-Dor, Witch of;   Enemy;   Intercession;   Samuel;   Samuel, Books of;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Endor, the Witch of;   Samuel;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Wherefore then dost thou ask of me - Was ever I wont to give answers that were not dictated by the Lord? It is his counsel alone that I communicate.

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Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on 1 Samuel 28:16". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/1-samuel-28.html. 1832.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Then said Samuel, wherefore then dost thou, ask of me,.... Whom thou knowest to have been a prophet of the Lord, and therefore can say nothing more or less than what comes from him, and is according to his will, if anything at all; the "devil" representing Samuel, whom Saul had called for, and reasons in such language as might be thought to be his own, though sometimes he betrays himself:

seeing the Lord is departed from thee; as Saul himself owned: to which he adds:

and is become thine enemy; to make his case appear still more desperate; for his whole view is to lead him to despair, which shows what sort of spirit he was: though some understand this as spoken of David, and read the words, and "he is with thine enemy"F9ויהי ערך "et est cum inimico tuo", Pagninus, Vatablus; so V. L. ; is on his side, and favours his cause; so the Targum,"and he is for the help of a man, whose enmity thou sharest in;'or who is at enmity with thee, meaning David; but now the true Samuel would never have said this, or suggested it, that David was an enemy to Saul, for he was not.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 1 Samuel 28:16". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/1-samuel-28.html. 1999.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

1 Samuel 28:16 Then said Samuel, Wherefore then dost thou ask of me, seeing the LORD is departed from thee, and is become thine enemy?

Ver. 16. Wherefore then dost thou ask of me?] Samuel himself could not have spoken more gravely, severely, divinely, than this fiend doth. (a) Well may lewd men be good preachers; well may hypocrites make a great flaunt; well, it may be, that in charms and spells there is nothing to be found but good words and good prayers; of which, nevertheless, one well saith, Si Magicae, Deus non vult tales: si piae, non per tales.

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Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on 1 Samuel 28:16". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/1-samuel-28.html. 1865-1868.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

16.Wherefore then dost thou ask of me — It required no prophet from heaven to suggest this question to the God-forsaken king, and if we regard it as any thing more than another device of the woman to increase Saul’s terror and impose upon him, we involve ourselves in the absurdity of supposing that after Jehovah had in his law condemned all seeking unto necromancers, and after he had refused to answer the king by urim and by prophets, he nevertheless disturbed a holy prophet from his rest in heaven, and suffered him to rise from the dead, apparently as if forced up against his will by the arts of witchcraft!

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Bibliographical Information
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 1 Samuel 28:16". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/1-samuel-28.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Rival. How vain is it to expect that a prophet can give an answer when the Lord is silent! Hebrew, "is become thy enemy." (Haydock)

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Bibliographical Information
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on 1 Samuel 28:16". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/1-samuel-28.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Then said Samuel. Jehovah might have sent "a lying spirit", and given by it a true message, just as He did in 2 Chronicles 18:19-22. Nothing was said but what was well known before.

become thine enemy. The Septuagint reads "and hath come to be with thy neighbour". Compare 1 Samuel 28:17 with 1 Samuel 15:28.

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Bibliographical Information
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 1 Samuel 28:16". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/1-samuel-28.html. 1909-1922.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(16) Seeing the Lord is departed from thee.—In other words, If Jehovah have left thee, why comest thou to consult me, His servant and prophet? The Hebrew word here translated “enemy” is only found in Psalms 139:20 and has been assumed to be an Aramaic form—ain for tsadde. There are, however, no other Aramaic forms in this book, which is written in pure “classical” Hebrew. The letter ain, or the first letter in the text here, through a very slight error of the copyist, could easily have been altered from tsadde, the first letter of the usual word for “enemy.” The LXX. and Vulg. Versions apparently had another reading before them, for they translate the last clause of the verse, “and is with thy neighbours.”

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Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on 1 Samuel 28:16". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/1-samuel-28.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Then said Samuel, Wherefore then dost thou ask of me, seeing the LORD is departed from thee, and is become thine enemy?
Wherefore
Judges 5:31; 2 Kings 6:27; Psalms 68:1-3; Revelation 18:20,24; 19:1-6
and is become
Lamentations 2:5
Reciprocal: 1 Samuel 30:8 - he answered him;  Job 13:24 - holdest me;  Psalm 27:3 - war;  Isaiah 8:19 - should not;  Hosea 9:12 - woe;  Matthew 27:4 - see;  Luke 16:24 - have;  Acts 13:22 - when

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 1 Samuel 28:16". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/1-samuel-28.html.