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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

1 Timothy 5:24

The sins of some men are quite evident, going before them to judgment; for others, their sins follow after.

Adam Clarke Commentary

Some men's sins are open beforehand - In appointing men to sacred offices in the Church, among the candidates Timothy would find,

  1. Some of whom he knew nothing, but only that they professed Christianity; let such be tried before they are appointed.
  • Some of whose faith and piety he had the fullest knowledge, and whose usefulness in the Church was well known.
  • Some whose lives were not at all or but partially reformed, who were still unchanged in their hearts, and unholy in their lives.
  • The sins of these latter were known to all; they go before to judgment; with them he could have no difficulty. With the first class he must have more difficulty; there might have been hypocrites among them, whose sins could not be known till after they were brought into the sacred office. The characters of all should be fully investigated. The sins of some, before this investigation, might be so manifest as to lead at once εις κρισιν to condemnation. The sins of others might be found out after, or in consequence of, this investigation; and those that were otherwise could not be long hid from his knowledge, or the knowledge of the Church. On all these accounts the exhortation is necessary: Lay hands suddenly on no man.


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    Bibliography
    Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 5:24". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/1-timothy-5.html. 1832.

    Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

    Some men‘s sins are open beforehand - This declaration, though it assumes a general form, is to be taken evidently in connection with the general subject of introducing men to the ministry 1 Timothy 5:22; and 1 Timothy 5:23 is to be regarded as a parenthesis. The apostle had given Timothy a charge 1 Timothy 5:22 respecting the character of those whom he should ordain. He here says, in reference to that, that the character of some people was manifest. There was no disguise. It was evident to all what it was, and there could be no danger of mistake respecting it. Their conduct was apparent to all. About such people he ought not to hesitate a moment, and, no matter what their talents, or learning, or rank in the community, he ought to have no participation in introducing them to the ministry.

    Going before to judgment - Their character is well understood. There is no need of waiting for the day of judgment to know what they are. Their deeds so precede their own appearance at the judgment-bar, that the record and the verdict can be made up before they arrive there, and there will be scarcely need even of the formality of a trial. The meaning here is, that there could be no doubt about the character of such people, and Timothy should not be accessory to their being introduced into the office of the ministry.

    And some men they follow after - That is, their character is not fully understood here. They conceal their plans. They practice deception. They appear different from what they really are. But the character of such people will be developed, and they will be judged according to their works. They cannot hope to escape with impunity. Though they have endeavored to hide their evil deeds, yet they will follow after them to the judgment-bar, and will meet them there. The meaning, in this connection, seems to be, that there ought to be circumspection in judging of the qualifications of men for the office of the ministry. It ought not to be inferred from favorable appearances at once, or on slight acquaintance, that they are qualified for the office - for they may be of the number of those whose characters, now concealed or misunderstood, will be developed only on the final trial.


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    Bibliography
    Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 5:24". "Barnes' Notes on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/1-timothy-5.html. 1870.

    Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

    Some men's sins are evident, going before unto judgment; and some men also they follow after.

    This is merely a comment to the effect that, in spite of all proper investigations, it is impossible, always, to know whether or not a given candidate is fitted for holy office in the church. The next verse would assure Timothy that his best judgment would be sufficient.


    Copyright Statement
    James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

    Bibliography
    Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 5:24". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/1-timothy-5.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

    John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

    Some men's sins are open before hand,.... Some men are such open and notorious sinners, that there is no need of any inquiry about them, or any examination of them; or any witnesses to be called to their character, in order to pass judgment concerning them; they even prevent and supersede any formal process about them. With such persons, the apostle intimates, Timothy could have no difficulty upon him, what to do with them; should they be proposed for the ministry, he would know at once what to do with them; namely, reject them. There would be no danger of his laying hands suddenly on such; for the following phrase,

    going before to judgment, is not to be understood of God's judgment, or of the last and future judgment of the great day, but of human judgment: it is true indeed that some men's sins are manifest and barefaced, before that day comes; while others are so private, that they will not be known till that day declares them, and brings to light the hidden things of darkness: and much such a way of speaking is used by the Jews; who sayF13T. Bab. Sota, fol. 3. 2. Vid. Avoda Zara, fol. 5. 1. ,

    "whoever committeth one transgression, (a notorious one,) in this world, it joins to him, "and goes before him" ליום הדין "to the day of judgment".'

    But this sense agrees not with the context; and with what propriety soever it may be said, of some men's sins going before to judgment, it cannot be said with any, that others follow after judgment; since at the general judgment, every work, both good and bad, with every secret thing, will be brought into it; and nothing will follow after that: wherefore the next clause,

    and some men they follow after; that is, some men's sins follow after, is to be understood of their following after human judgment; or of their appearing in the light after judgment has been passed upon them, which before were hid: and the sense of the whole is this, that the characters of some men are so well known, and it is so plain a case, that they are destitute of the grace of God; have not ministerial gifts; or are unsound in the faith; or are men of immoral lives and conversations; so that there can be no dispute about them, whether they are to be admitted into the ministry of the word or rejected. But there are other persons who may be proposed, whose sins or errors are so private, that they may not be known; and yet may appear afterwards; wherefore it is proper to take time, and not be too hasty, or lay hands suddenly on men.


    Copyright Statement
    The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
    A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

    Bibliography
    Gill, John. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 5:24". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/1-timothy-5.html. 1999.

    Geneva Study Bible

    20 Some men's sins are open beforehand, going before to judgment; and some [men] they follow after.

    (20) Because hypocrites sometimes creep into the ministry, even though there is ever so great diligence used, the apostle wishes the pastors not to be therefore troubled, or slack at all in their diligence in trying and examining, because the Lord has appointed a time to discover the faults of such men, and it is our duty to take heed that we do not offend in our trying and examining.

    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 5:24". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/1-timothy-5.html. 1599-1645.

    Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

    Two kinds of sins are specified: those palpably manifest (so the Greek for “open beforehand” ought to be translated; so in Hebrews 7:14, it is translated “evident”; literally, “beforethe eyes, that is, notorious), further explained as “going before to judgment”; and those which follow after the men (“some men they, that is, their sins, follow after”), namely, not going beforehand, loudly accusing, but hidden till they come to the judgment: so 1 Timothy 5:25, the good works are of two classes: those palpably manifest (translate so, instead of “manifest beforehand”) and “those that are otherwise,” that is, not palpably manifest. Both alike “cannot be hid”; the former class in the case of bad and good are manifest already; the latter class in the case of both are not manifest now, but shall be so at the final judgment.

    going before to judgment — as heralds; crying sins which accuse their perpetrator. The connection seems to me this: He had enjoined Timothy, 1 Timothy 5:20, “Rebuke them that sin before all”: and in 1 Timothy 5:22, “Neither be partaker of other men‘s sins,” by ordaining ungodly men; having then by a digression at the clause, “keep thyself pure,” guarded against an ascetical error of Timothy in fancying purity consisted in asceticism, and having exhorted him to use wine for strengthening him in his work, he returns to the subject of his being vigorous as an overseer in rebuking sin, whether in presbyters or people, and in avoiding participation in men‘s sins by ordaining ungodly candidates. He says, therefore, there are two classes of sins, as there are two classes of good works: those palpably manifest, and those not so; the former are those on which thou shouldest act decidedly at once when called on, whether to rebuke in general, or to ordain ministers in particular; as to the latter, the final judgment alone can decide; however hidden now they “cannot be hid” then. This could only be said of the final judgment (1 Corinthians 4:5; therefore, Alford‘s reference of this verse to Timothy‘s judgment in choosing elders must be wrong); all judgments before then are fallible. Thus he implies that Timothy can only be responsible if he connive at manifest, or evident sins; not that those that are otherwise shall escape judgment at last: just as in the case of good works, he can only be responsible for taking into account in his judgments those which are patent to all, not those secret good works which nevertheless will not remain hidden at the final judgment.


    Copyright Statement
    These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
    This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

    Bibliography
    Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 5:24". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/1-timothy-5.html. 1871-8.

    Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

    Evident (προδηλοιprodēloi). “Openly plain,” “plain before all.” Old word, in N.T. only here and Hebrews 7:24.

    Going before unto judgment (προαγουσαι εις κρισινproagousai eis krisin). See 1 Timothy 1:18 for προαγωproagō The sins are so plain that they receive instant condemnation.

    And some men also they follow after (τισιν δε και επακολουτουσινtisin de kai epakolouthousin). Associative instrumental case τισινtisin with επακολουτουσινepakolouthousin for which verb see 1 Timothy 5:10, “dog their steps” (Parry) like 1 Peter 2:21, not clearly manifest at first, but come out plainly at last. How true that is of secret sins.


    Copyright Statement
    The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)

    Bibliography
    Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 5:24". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/1-timothy-5.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

    Vincent's Word Studies

    Open beforehand ( προδηλοί )

    A.V. wrong in giving πρὸ a temporal force, whereas it merely strengthens δηλοί evidentmanifest. The meaning is openly manifested to all eyes. In N.T. only here, 1 Timothy 5:25, and Hebrews 7:14. In lxx, see 2 Maccabees 3:17; 14:39.

    Going before to judgment ( προάγουσαι εἰς κρίσιν )

    Προάγειν , oP. In N.T. habitually with a local meaning, either intransitive, as Matthew href="/desk/?q=mt+2:9&sr=1">Matthew 2:9; Matthew 14:22; Mark 11:9; or transitive, as Acts 12:6; Acts 17:5. The meaning here is that these open sins go before their perpetrator to the judgment-seat like heralds, proclaiming their sentence in advance. Κρίσιν , not specifically of the judgment of men or of the final judgment of God, or of the sentence of an ecclesiastical court - but indefinitely. The writer would say: no judicial utterance is necessary to condemn them of these sins. The word in Paul, only 2 Thessalonians 1:5.

    They follow after ( ἐπακολουθοῦσιν )

    The verb only here, 1 Timothy 5:24, 1 Peter 2:21, and (the disputed) Mark 16:20. The sins follow up the offender to the bar of judgment, and are first made openly manifest there.


    Copyright Statement
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    Bibliography
    Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 5:24". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/1-timothy-5.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

    Wesley's Explanatory Notes

    Some men's sins are open beforehand, going before to judgment; and some men they follow after.

    Some men's sins are manifest beforehand — Before any strict inquiry be made.

    Going before to judgment — So that you may immediately judge them unworthy of any spiritual office.

    And some they — Their sins.

    Follow after — More covertly.


    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

    Bibliography
    Wesley, John. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 5:24". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/1-timothy-5.html. 1765.

    Abbott's Illustrated New Testament

    They follow after; that is, they are concealed for a time, and afterwards developed.


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    Bibliography
    Abbott, John S. C. & Abbott, Jacob. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 5:24". "Abbott's Illustrated New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ain/1-timothy-5.html. 1878.

    Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

    24The sins of some men are visible beforehand As there is nothing that distresses more the faithful ministers of the Church, than to see no way of correcting evils, and to be compelled to endure hypocrites, of whose wickedness they are aware and to be unable to banish from the Church many who are destructive plagues, or even to hinder them from spreading their venom by secret arts; (115) Paul supports Timothy by this consolation, that, when it shall please God, they, will one day be brought to public view. Thus he strengthens him for the exercise of patience; because he ought calmly to await the fit time which God in his wisdom has appointed.

    There is another kind of base conduct that sorely distresses good and holy pastors. When they have most conscientiously discharged their duty, they are provoked by many unfair statements, are loaded with much ill-will, and perceive that those actions which deserved praise are turned into blame. Paul meets this case also, by informing Timothy, that there are some good works which are reserved for being brought to light at a future period; and consequently that, if their praise is, as it were, buried under ground by the ingratitude of men, that also ought to be patiently endured, till the time of revelation have arrived.

    Yet not only does he provide a remedy for these evils, but, because it often happens that we are mistaken in choosing ministers, unworthy persons insinuating themselves cunningly, and the good being unknown to us; and even though we do not go wrong in judging, but still cannot bring others to approve of our judgment, the most excellent being rejected, notwithstanding all our efforts to the contrary, while bad men either insinuate or force themselves forward; it is impossible that our condition and that of the Church should not occasion great anguish. Accordingly, Paul strenuously endeavors to remove, or at least to alleviate, this cause of uneasiness. The meaning may be thus summed up. “We must bear what cannot be immediately corrected; we must sigh and groan, while the time for the remedy is not fully come; and we must not apply force to diseases, till they are either ripened or laid open. On the other hand, when virtue does not receive the honor which it deserves, we must wait for the full time of revelation, and endure the stupidity of the world, and wait quietly in darkness till the day dawn.”

    Hastening to judgment I now come to the words, after having given a brief illustration of the subject. When he says that the sins of some men are visible beforehand, he means that they are discovered early, and come to the knowledge of men, as it were, before the time. He expresses the same thing by another comparison, that they run, as it were, and “hasten to their judgment;” for we see that many run headlong, and, of their own accord, bring damnation on themselves, though the whole world is desirous to save them. Whenever this happens, let us remember that the reprobate are prompted by an unseen movement of Providence, to throw out their foam.

    In some they follow after The rendering given by Erasmus, “Some they follow after,” I do not approve. Although it seems to be more in accordance with the Greek construction, yet the sense requires that the preposition ἐν be understood; for the change of case does not destroy the contrast. As he had said that the sins of some men hasten rapidly to their judgment; so now, on the other hand, he adds, that the sins of some men (or, of others) come slowly to be known. But instead of the genitive “of some,” he uses the dative “in some” (or “in others.”) He means that, although the sins of some men may be concealed longer than we would wish, and are slowly brought to light, yet they shall not always be concealed; for they too shall have their own time. And if the version of Erasmus be preferred, still the meaning must be the same, that, although the vengeance of God does not hasten, yet it follows slowly behind them.


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    Bibliography
    Calvin, John. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 5:24". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/1-timothy-5.html. 1840-57.

    Scofield's Reference Notes

    sins

    Sin. (See Scofield "Romans 3:23").


    Copyright Statement
    These files are considered public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available in the Online Bible Software Library.

    Bibliography
    Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on 1 Timothy 5:24". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/1-timothy-5.html. 1917.

    John Trapp Complete Commentary

    24 Some men’s sins are open beforehand, going before to judgment; and some men they follow after.

    Ver. 24. Some men’s sins] The Judge of the earth keepeth his petty sessions now, letting the law pass upon some few, reserving the rest till the great assizes. Some wicked God punisheth here, lest his providence, but not all, lest his patience and promise of judgment, should be called into question, as Augustine hath observed.


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    Bibliography
    Trapp, John. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 5:24". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/1-timothy-5.html. 1865-1868.

    Sermon Bible Commentary

    1 Timothy 5:24

    The Sins that follow Us.

    The visible Church holds still within its outward pale thousands whose lives are their own condemnation. These are they whose sins are "open beforehand"; they need no penetrating scrutiny, no process of conviction. Their sins go before to judgment, sent forward to prepare a place on the left hand of the Judge in that great day. "And some men they follow after." That is to say, there are men all fair without, but within full of disguised and deadly evil. Let us see what the words mean.

    I. They mean that all sins have their proper chastisement; which, however long delayed and seemingly averted, will as a general law, sooner or later, overtake the sinner. I say all sins, because chastisement follows often even upon sins that are repented of, as in the case of David; and I say also as a general law, because it seems sometimes that God, in His tender compassion to individual cases, does hold back the chastisement of His rod, and by ways of peculiar lovingkindness make perfect the humiliation of particular penitents. Our sins follow us by the rod of chastisement.

    II. Again, past sins follow after sinners in the active power by which they still keep a hold on their present state of heart. It is one of the worst effects of sin, that after commission, it clings to the soul. Every sin leaves some deposit in the spiritual nature. It quickens the original root of evil; it multiplies and unfolds its manifold corruption. And, worst of all, it brings on a deadness and insensibility of the spiritual nature. Our present falls, infirmities, spiritual struggles, afflictions, and dangerous inclinations, are, for the most part, the sins of our past life, following us in chastisement, and cleaving as diseases and temptations.

    III. And further, whether or no sins follow in chastisement now, they will surely overtake us in the judgment. The long quest of sin pursuing the guilty shall be ended before the great white throne. All masks shall be torn off from all faces there, and we shall be seen, not as we show ourselves, but as we are. It will be a fearful meeting between a sinner and his very self, when his true self shall confront his false, and the multitude of his sins shall clamour on every side. Such must some day be the doom of the most successful hypocrite, of the fairest and least suspected sinner.

    H. E. Manning, Sermons, vol. iii., p. 73.


    References: 1 Timothy 5:24.—T. T. Munger, The Freedom of Faith, p. 317, J. Vaughan, Fifty Sermons, 1874, p. 109; J. Baines, Sermons, p. 15; Homilist, vol. vi., p. 115. 1 Timothy 6:1-21.—Expositor, 1st series, vol. iv., p. 191. 1 Timothy 6:4, 1 Timothy 6:5.—Homilist, vol. vi., p. 1. 1 Timothy 6:6-13.—Homiletic Magazine, vol. x., p. 321. 1 Timothy 6:7.—A. F. Joscelyne, Christian World Pulpit, vol. xvi., p. 323; O. Morris, Ibid., vol. xxviii., p. 132. 1 Timothy 6:7, 1 Timothy 6:8.—Plain Sermons by Contributors to "Tracts for the Times," vol. v., p. 38. 1 Timothy 6:9.—A. Davies, Ibid., vol. xiii., p. 245. 1 Timothy 6:9, 1 Timothy 6:10.—H. W. Beecher, Ibid., vol. xxvi., p. 227; Plain Sermons, vol. x., p. 195. 1 Timothy 6:11-16.—E. White, Ibid., vol. xxxiii., pp. 113, 129.




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    Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 5:24". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/1-timothy-5.html.

    Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

    1 Timothy 5:24. Some—are open before-hand, &c.— Are notorious, going before to judgment; and some men follow after.

    Inferences.—With what respect should the aged, whether men or women, and with what affability and purity should younger people, be cautioned against every sinful practice and avoidable infirmity! The descendants of poor widows ought to treat them with attention, and provide as honourably for them as they can. How unnatural, and how contrary to all the principles of Christianity, and worse than heathenish is it, for gospel professors to neglect their destitute parents and their own families! But if the offspring or pious relations of poor widows are not able to maintain them, the church to which they belong ought to take them under its care. And if any church want good matrons to attend their sick and poor, they may appoint such widows of advanced years to that service, as have obtained a good report, and shewn a humble compassionate regard to the saints and servants of Christ: but young widows ought not to be put into that office, lest, giving themselves up to pleasure, they become idle, tattling, busy-bodies who are the pests of society; and at length renounce their profession of the true faith, and, following the devices of Satan, throw off religious restraints to their own condemnation: they are indeed in the worst sense dead, while they live: but as to poor young widows of better character, instead of their being burdensome to the church, it may be advisable for them to marry believing husbands, who are capable of maintaining them; and to bear and bring up such children in the fear of the Lord, as he may be pleased to give them in his Providence; as also to manage their household business with economy and good housewifery.—How solemn is the charge given in this chapter, to all bishops and pastors, as well as evangelists, in the presence of God and his Christ, and the holy angels, that they faithfully declare these things, and fulfil every part of their office! and though reproofs and censures are the most difficult and grievous duties of their station, yet they are to discharge them with fidelity, and without partiality, whether it be towards church officers or towards private members. But with what care and caution should the bishops or chief pastors of churches proceed in ordinations, lest they themselves share with the ordained in their guilt! And, O! what prudence, tenderness, and courage do they need for conducting themselves, according to the appearances of some people's sins on the one hand, and good deeds on the other, which shew themselves before or after they pass judgment upon them! How arduous, upon the whole, is the ministerial work! and how ought they, who are eminently laborious in preaching and supporting the pure gospel of Christ, to be honoured with great respect and a comfortable maintenance, according to the directions of both the Old and New Testaments. And though they ought to be temperate in all things, they need not confine themselves to drinking water; but may lawfully use wine, with moderation, for the stomach's sake, when their labours and bodily infirmities require it, and it becomes needful for the preservation of their health, and their service in the church.

    REFLECTIONS.—1st, The apostle proceeds to give Timothy farther directions concerning the needful, though less pleasing, work of rebuke. Ministers are reprovers by office and must be faithful to this trust.

    Rebuke not an elder, in years or office (if ought be found in him which demands censure,) with a magisterial air, or an unbecoming severity; but, out of respect to his venerable years, entreat him as a father, to remove the cause of offence: and the younger men as brethren, with all freedom, yet withal in love and meekness: the elder women, as mothers, with due respect; the younger, as sisters, with all purity; avoiding every thought, word, look, or gesture, that has the most distant tendency to evil.

    2nd, The apostle particularly directs Timothy, how to behave in the case of widows who applied to be assisted out of the church's stock, and to be employed in pious offices under the direction of the deacons.

    1. Honour widows that are widows indeed, really in distress, in need of assistance, and deserving to be placed on the church's list; and these he describes as follows: Now she that it a widow indeed, and desolate, without any friends to support her, trusteth in God, who is the friend of the friendless; and they who cast their care upon him shall not be destitute: and such a one continueth in supplications and prayers night and day; depending upon the Lord's providential help, and shewing her undissembled piety. But she that liveth in pleasure, gayly, idly, and voluptuously, is dead while she liveth; dead to God and godliness, and in no wise to be received of the church, or supported from the common stock. And these things give in charge, that they may be blameless, and that no just offences may call for rebuke or censure. Note; A life of carnal pleasure is a state of real death: the soul there lies entombed in flesh, and such a person is really a living sepulchre.

    2. If any widows have near relations capable of providing for them, the church ought not to be burdened with their maintenance. If any widows have children or nephews, or grandchildren, let them learn first to shew piety at home, and to requite their parents, by taking all care of them when labouring under age and infirmities; for that is good and acceptable before God; their bounden duty, and agreeable to his holy will. But if any one who makes profession of the Christian name, refuse that assistance, which in such a case he is bound to afford, and provide not for his own, and specially for these of his own house, (his aged parents, next to his wife and children, claiming a title to maintenance, as parts of that family which depend on him for a provision,) he hath denied the faith, by such a conduct, and is worse than an infidel: even the very heathen will rise up to condemn a conduct so base and unnatural. Therefore if any man or woman that believeth, have widows, mothers, or grandmothers, let them relieve them, and let not the church be charged; that it may have a sufficiency to relieve them that are widows indeed.

    3. He points out the age and qualifications of those who should be entered on the poor's list, or taken into office and employed by the church under the deacons. Let not a widow be taken into the number under threescore years old, having been the wife of one man; well reported of for good works in her former better days; if she have brought up children in the nurture and admonition of the Lord; if she have lodged strangers, when brought by Providence in her way; if she have washed the saints' feet, condescending to the lower offices of charity; if she have relieved the afflicted, with her help, her counsel, and her substance; if she have diligently followed every good work.

    4. But the younger widows refuse: for when they have begun to wax wanton against Christ, as they may be in danger of doing, they will then marry, improperly, perhaps wickedly, into some heathen family; having thus damnation, because they have cast off their first faith, and apostatized from the profession which they once made: and withal they learn to be idle, wandering about from house to house in useless and impertinent visiting; and not only idle, but tattlers also, and busy bodies, officious and talkative, speaking things which they ought not, to the hurt of their neighbour's reputation, and the disturbance of society.

    3rdly, The apostle directs Timothy,

    1. Concerning the proper maintenance of a gospel ministry. Let the elders that rule well, be counted worthy of double honour, highly esteemed and liberally provided for, especially they who labour in the word and doctrine, whose eminent zeal and diligence require a suitable acknowledgment: for the scripture saith, Thou shalt not muzzle the ox that treadeth out the corn; but as he works, he shall be freely allowed to eat: and our Lord hath said, The labourer is worthy of his reward. Note; The work of the ministry is laborious; and well do they who discharge it with zeal and diligence, deserve a comfortable provision.

    2. Concerning the accusation of an elder. Against an elder receive not an accusation, but before two or three witnesses of character and credibility; and listen to no base surmises or slanderous suggestions. Them that sin before all, being open, notorious, and scandalous offenders, rebuke before all, publicly and with sharpness, that others also may fear, respecting no man's rank or greatness. I charge thee before God, and the Lord Jesus Christ, the eternal Judge; and the elect angels, who are the spirits that minister to the heirs of salvation; that thou observe these things without preferring one before another, not prejudging the cause, through favour or affection; doing nothing by partiality, nor suffering any consideration to prejudice or bias your mind for or against any man, but deciding according to truth.

    3. Concerning the ordination of ministers. Lay hands suddenly on no man to put him into the ministry, till he has been thoroughly tried, and found faithful, and able; neither be partaker of other mens' sins, by conniving at the intrusion of unfit persons into the sacred office: keep thyself pure from the blood of all men, discountenancing all unbecoming behaviour, and in thy own conversation a pattern of purity and chastity.

    4. Concerning his own health. Drink no longer water, but use a little wine for thy stomach's sake, and thine often infirmities; indefatigable labour and strict abstemiousness probably preyed upon a tender constitution, and required in moderation something more supporting than water, to which he had confined himself. Note; The creatures of God are designed for our use and comfort; only let them be used with moderation; not to pamper the flesh, but so as to enable us the better to fulfil the duties of our station.

    5. With regard to censure and ordination, of which he had before spoken, he farther observes, Some men's sins are open beforehand, going before to judgment; and, being notorious, such are to be rejected from the ministry, and laid under the church's censure; and some men they follow after, and though they studiously conceal their sins, yet, on deeper and closer examination, they will after a while come out; and therefore they should not hastily be admitted into sacred orders, without due probation. Likewise also the good works of some are manifest beforehand, their whole character strikingly exemplary, and their ministerial gifts eminent; so that they may be admitted without hesitation: and they that are otherwise cannot be hid; more caution is needful with those whose qualifications are dubious, and it requires some time to make it clear whether they should be received; for, if they are really corrupt in principle or practice, they will soon betray themselves. Note; (1.) Before any be admitted into sacred orders, their character and qualifications should be well examined. An ignorant and scandalous ministry is the greater reproach to any church. (2.) However secretly men may hide their sins, yet usually in time their true character appears, and at least at a judgment-day no veil can hide the workers of iniquity.


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    Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 5:24". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/1-timothy-5.html. 1801-1803.

    Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament

    St. Paul had just before exhorted Timothy to keep himself pure from other men's sins, whether candidates or penitents: here comes in subsequent advice, in order thereunto: as if our apostle had said, "Timothy, if thou beest diligent to observe, and not over hasty either in ordaining candidates, or absolving penitents, thou mayest in some measure perceive who are worthy, and who are unworthy. If thou layest thine hands upon those who are actually faulty, thou partakest with them, by being an occasion of their sinning; but if thou canst not discover their faultiness beforehand, though they afterwards prove wicked, it is not thy fault; God will at length detect them, yea, they will discover themselves; and when their faults are manifest, deal with them according to the discipline of the church."

    Learn hence, 1. That how much soever sinners attempt the hiding, yet they cnnot actually hide themselves, or their sinnings, from God's sight and knowledge. They cannot be hid, says St. Paul, though men labour much to hide them.

    Oh! sinner, there is no way to hide thyself from God: thou mayest by repentance hide thyself in God, in the love, in the favour, in the mercy of God, but from God thou canst not be hid. As the saints' good works are open and manifest in the sight and to the view of God, so they that are otherwise cannot be hid from him who is every where? Or what thing can be our covering from him, in whose sight all things are open? Lord! what will it avail to hide ourselves from men, when we lie open and manifest to the eye of God? They that are otherwise cannot be hid.


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    Burkitt, William. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 5:24". Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wbc/1-timothy-5.html. 1700-1703.

    Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

    24.] The same subject continued: τὸν περὶ τῆς χειροτονίας ἀναλαμβάνει λόγον. Thdrt. If my view of the last verse is correct, the connexion will be found in the fact, that the conservation of himself in health and vigour would ensure his being able to deal ably and firmly with the cases which should come before him for decision. To guide him still further in this, the Apostle subjoins this remark, indicating two classes of characters with which he would have to deal in judging, whether favourably or unfavourably.

    Of some men the sins (connects with ἁμαρτίαις ἀλλοτρίαις, 1 Timothy 5:22) are evident (there does not seem to be any relation of time in πρόδηλοι, ‘manifest beforehand,’—for thus the meaning would be,—as in πρόδηλος πότμος, κίνδυνος, &c., that the sins were manifest before they were committed, which would reduce this case to the other (see below): but the προ- seems rather of place than of time,— πρὸ τῶν ὀφθαλμῶν,—openly manifest,—notorious by common report), going before them (so that the man’s bad report comes to the person appointed to judge, before the man himself: not transitive, as Heinrichs,—‘peccata in judicium eos vocant’) to judgment (i.e. so that when they come before thee to be judged of as candidates, their sins have arrived before them): but some men again they (their sins) follow (i.e. after-proof brings out the correctness or otherwise of the judgment. Their characters come before thee unanticipated by adverse rumour: but thou mayest by examination discover those flaws in their conduct which had been skilfully concealed—the sins which, so to speak, follow at their heels. Therefore be watchful, and do not let the mere non-existence of previous adverse rumour lead thee always to presume fitness for the sacred office).


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    Alford, Henry. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 5:24". Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hac/1-timothy-5.html. 1863-1878.

    Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

    1 Timothy 5:24. This and the following verse, in close relation to one another, as ὡσαύτως shows, express a truth quite general, which the context defines more precisely.

    τινῶν ἀνθρώπων αἱ ἁμαρτίαι πρόδηλοί εἰσι] πρόδηλος does not mean “formerly manifest” (Calvin, Beza, Leo, Mack, Matthies, and others), but “manifest before all eyes” (Chrysostom, Theodoret, de Wette, Wiesinger, Hofmann, and others). Comp. Hebrews 7:14 (see Delitzsch, comment. on the passage); Judith 8:29; 2 Maccabees 3:17; 2 Maccabees 14:39; so also in the classics (comp. the Latin propalam).

    προάγουσαι εἰς κρίσιν is here, as often, intransitive (opp. ἀκολουθεῖν, comp. Matthew 21:9), equivalent to “precede.” According to the sense, we must supply as the dative of more precise definition: “those who have committed the sins.”

    εἰς κρίσιν, equivalent to “to judgment.” The meaning therefore is: some men are in such a condition that their sins are not only made manifest by the κρίσις, but they are already notorious beforehand; they precede to judgment those who have practised them, and thus show in anticipation the result of the judgment.

    The next clause forms the contrast to this thought: τισὶ δὲ καὶ ἐπακολουθοῦσιν] ἐπακολουθεῖν corresponds to the προάγειν, and ἄδηλοι naturally suggests itself in contrast with πρόδηλοι. The meaning is: Some men are in such a condition that—in regard to the κρίσις—their sins follow them, i.e. that their sins are only made manifest by their coming to judgment; the judgment alone makes their sins manifest.

    Mack imports arbitrary references by his interpretation: “they follow hard on their heels, so that they cannot remain unknown, except to those hasty and careless in observing.”

    De Wette is right in his explanation: “with some they are only known afterwards;” but he is wrong in his additional remark: “when they have gone on a longer or shorter distance;” on this point there is clearly nothing said here.

    As the verse has the appearance of an aphorism, κρίσις is to be taken quite generally; but since the apostle utters this general sentence in reference to 1 Timothy 5:22, it is to warn Timothy that he is to lay hands on no man rashly, etc., without a κρίσις, i.e. without subjecting him to a judgment whereby sins, usually hidden, may become manifest.

    As there is no good ground for interpreting 1 Timothy 5:22 of ordination, it is wrong to take κρίσις here as identical with δοκιμάζειν, 1 Timothy 3:10. For de Wette’s explanation also: “the ecclesiastical decision of the moral censor,” there is no sufficient ground. There is as little ground for the opinion of some expositors (Wiesinger, van Oosterzee, Hofmann) who interpret the κρίσις of the judgment of God, and find the thought expressed that in the divine judgment all sins alike, whether manifest before or hidden, shall come to light. Wiesinger further assumes that thereby the exhortation to Timothy to beware of others’ sins as of his own, is strengthened. But, on the one hand, it is arbitrary to supply θεοῦ with κρίσις;(196) on the other hand, the apostle is not discussing various sins, but the sins of various men. Further, it is wrong to obscure the meaning of ἐπακολουθοῦσιν, and to put in its place the thought, “they are hidden.” Besides, we cannot see how the thought thus taken could serve Timothy as a standard for his conduct, for those sins which are only made manifest by the last judgment must remain hidden to Timothy, in which case he could not be reproved for laying hands on those who had committed such sins.(197) To the opinion that Paul wished to strengthen his exhortation to Timothy by alluding to the last judgment there is this objection, that the only reason for drawing a distinction between manifest and hidden sins, would have been a suspicion on Paul’s part that Timothy was guilty of secret sins. But how could he have such a suspicion, and how can this interpretation agree with τινῶν ἀνθρώπων and τισὶ δέ?

    The κρίσις here mentioned is therefore not the divine judgment, but a trial which Timothy must hold, lest the thing of which he is warned in 1 Timothy 5:22 should happen (so, too, Plitt).


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    Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 5:24". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/1-timothy-5.html. 1832.

    Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

    1 Timothy 5:24. τινῶν, of some) Not only is the aspect of the sins which are committed [i.e the footing on which they stand, the point of view from which they are to be regarded] different, but also of the men, though committing the same sins.— αἱ ἁμαρτίαι, the sins) their evil deeds, and their evil habits to be known from the former.— πρόδηλοι) manifest before any inquiry is made, or anything determined concerning the men.— προάγουσαι) going before, preceding him that commits them, so that he is immediately seen to be unworthy of the imposition of hands. The antithesis is, follow after.— εἰς κρίσιν) [Engl. Vers. to judgment] so far as concerns the judgment to be formed of the men.— τισὶ) That is more emphatic than if he had repeated τινῶν; some also their own sins follow.— ἐπακαλουθοῦσι follow after) Meanwhile we must wait patiently, till the matter fully discloses itself, and we must not inquire too harshly. God, however, directs His faithful servant to do and say what is seasonable. The preposition ἐπὶ implies no long interval.


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    Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 5:24". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/1-timothy-5.html. 1897.

    Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

    The sense of this verse depends upon the term krisin, which we translate judgment, it being doubtful whether it is to be understood of the judgment of God, or the judgment of men in ecclesiastical judicatories. If we understand the words of the judgment of God, the sense is this: Some men’s sins are punished in this life, before their persons come before God’s judgment-seat; others are more private and concealed, the punishment of which follows after. But this interpretation must suppose Paul here to run into another argument, differing from what he had before spoken upon, which though it be not unusual with the apostle, yet there being no need we should say he doth so in this place, I rather incline to think, that by judgment is in this place meant the judgement of the church, as to persons fit to be trusted with any part of the ministry of it: Some men (saith the apostle) are open, lewd, scandalous persons, whose erroneousness, or sottish life, hath been manifest before they offer themselves to the church’s judgment, to be put into the office of elders or deacons; concerning these thy way is plain, admit them not. Others discover not the erroneousness of their principles, nor the impetuousness of their lusts, before they have obtained what they aim at, and are got into office; for these, they must fall under thy judgment, when they do discover what they are, and turn them out again.


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    Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 1 Timothy 5:24". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/1-timothy-5.html. 1685.

    Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

    Going before to judgment; they precede the man, as it were, to the place of judgment, and witness against him beforehand to his condemnation.

    They follow after; some wicked men’s characters are not known at first; it is necessary to take time, make inquiries, and become more acquainted with them.


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    Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 5:24". "Family Bible New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/1-timothy-5.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

    Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges

    24. To avoid a falsely favourable estimate, remember that while some men’s sins are notoriously evident (πρόδηλοι) and lead the way to judgement (i.e. they go before like heralds, as it were), the sins of other men are hidden and follow the perpetrators (i.e. their sin will find men out at last, but it does not always proclaim the impending judgement beforehand). The practical inference is that one in Timothy’s position dare not rest satisfied with formal negative evidence as to the character of those upon whom he lays hands; ‘nothing to their discredit’ is not a sufficient guarantee, unless careful and detailed enquiry has been made.

    προδήλος only occurs again in N.T. at Hebrews 7:14, and in LXX. at Judith 8:29; 2 Maccabees 3:17; 2 Maccabees 14:39.


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    "Commentary on 1 Timothy 5:24". "Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cgt/1-timothy-5.html. 1896.

    Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

    24. Some men’s sins—Refers back to other men’s sins. Yet 1 Timothy 5:23 is no parenthesis, being a continuation of the subject of keeping pure, that is, from other men’s sins, in promoting them to responsible positions. How shall Timothy find other men’s sins in Church judicature? Some men’s sins will appear open, that is, clear and evident; their antecedents will like witnesses, go beforehand to the ecclesiastical trial and judgment, and convict them. Some men, however, the antecedents do not convict; but they, the sins, with their evidence, will follow after the arraignment, and bring conviction by the proof adduced.


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    Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 5:24". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/1-timothy-5.html. 1874-1909.

    Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

    ‘Some men’s sins are evident, going before to judgment, and some men also they follow after.’

    The illustration continues. Just as Ephesian water causes some to throw up immediately, and with others only has a much slower effect which is not at first visible, so is it with men. With some their sin is immediately obvious. With others it takes time for their sin to work through. With appointments to Christian service it is the second kind of sin that needs to be most guarded against, the kind that only becomes apparent later. Few would appoint an openly sinful man (or so one would think), but how easily, if care is not taken, can a man be appointed who will go on to be a disaster. Thus in making the selection wine is needed as well as water.

    All will, however, be revealed at the Judgment, even if not before, for then the activities of servants of God will be tried in the fire to see of what kind they are. Then the sins which follow after will also be taken into account (1 Corinthians 3:10-16).


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    Pett, Peter. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 5:24". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/1-timothy-5.html. 2013.

    Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

    1 Timothy 5:24. Going before to judgment. After the advice given parenthetically, the latter returns to the subject of Church discipline. The ‘other men’s sins’ in which Timothy is not to be a partaker, are of two classes—(1) flagrant, notorious, so conspicuous even before the trial, that they scarcely need witnesses, are, indeed, as the accusers who bring the criminal before the judge; (2) those which do not come out at first, but, as it were, creep on, and dog the man’s steps, and at last overtake him. Receiving the words as applicable chiefly to the precept against hasty laying on of hands, they contain a warning against assuming fitness from the absence of open scandal. Even in such cases a careful inquiry was not to be neglected. It is obvious that the judgment spoken of is man’s and not God’s, temporal and not eternal in its results.


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    Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 5:24". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/1-timothy-5.html. 1879-90.

    The Expositor's Greek Testament

    1 Timothy 5:24. The connexion of this general statement is especially with 1 Timothy 5:22. The solemn warning against the awful consequences of an ill-considered moral judgment on those condemned was calculated to overwhelm a weak man with anxiety. Here the apostle assures Timothy that in actual practical experience the moral diagnosis of men’s characters is not so perplexing as might be supposed antecedently. The exegesis of προάγουσαι and ἐπακολουθοῦσιν depends on the view we take of κρίσις; vis., whether it refers to a judgment passed by man in this world, or to the final doom pronounced by God in the next. κρίσις is used of such a judgment as man may pass, in John 8:16, 2 Peter 2:11, Judges 1:9; though the word is more frequently used of the Great final Judgment. If, as is generally allowed, these verses, 24 and 25, are resumptive of 1 Timothy 5:22, the κρίσις here indicated is that of the Church ruler, Timothy in this case, deciding for or against the admission of men to communion (or to ordination). It is evident that the final Judgment of God, which no one can certainly forecast, cannot help or hinder a decision made in this life by one man about another. The meaning, then, of the clause is as follows: In the case of some men, you have no hesitation as to your verdict; their sins are notorious and force you to an adverse judgment. With regard to others, your suspicions, your instinctive feeling of moral disapproval, comes to be confirmed and justified by subsequent revelation of sins that had been concealed. This is, in the main, the explanation adopted by Alford.

    πρόδηλοι: Not open beforehand (A.V.), but evident (R.V.), manifesta sunt (Vulg.) as in Hebrews 7:14 (neut.). The προ is not indicative of antecedence in time, but of publicity, as in προεγράφη, Galatians 3:1.

    προάγουσαι: It is best to take this in a transitive sense, as in Acts 12:1; Acts 17:5; Acts 25:26, of bringing a prisoner forth to trial. Here the object of the verb is understood out of τινῶν ἀνθρώπων. The men are in the custody of their sins, which also testify against them. In the other case, the witnesses—the sins—do not appear until the persons on trial have had sentence pronounced on them. We supply εἰς κρίσιν after ἐπακολουθοῦσιν.


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    Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 5:24". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/1-timothy-5.html. 1897-1910.

    George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

    -25

    Some men's sins are manifest, &c. These two verses seem connected with the admonition before given, as to ordaining ministers, some men's sins and evil life being so manifest, that they are certain to be rejected. --- And some men they follow after: they appear not till after a trial and examination. --- In like manner also good deeds, and good lives of some men, are so manifest, that they are easily admitted. And such as are otherwise, (that is, when they are desirous to conceal their virtues) they cannot be hidden: by an examination and trial they will appear. (Witham) --- This refers to what he had said before, that he ought not easily to ordain others, but pass his judgment with scrutiny and impartiality. But there are some whom the public voice already condemns; their crimes are manifest: and there are others, though bad, whose crimes cannot be proved without examination. (Calmet) --- St. Basil thinks it refers to the general judgment. Many both good and bad actions are at present manifest: others shall not be known till the day of judgment. Hypocrites are reserved to be judged by the Lord, as we cannot pronounce upon their actions. (St. Basil, lib. de Virgin.)


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    Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 5:24". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/1-timothy-5.html. 1859.

    Mark Dunagan Commentary on the Bible

    “The sins of some men are quite evident, going before them to judgment”: The term “evident” means “open, manifest, known to all”. In the context, the “sins” under consideration may be specifically the sins of elders (5:20), yet the principle in this verse would apply to all men. “Paul explains that the wise choosing of elders is not an impossible task” (Kent p. 188). The true character of a man will manifest itself sooner or later. “These principles would aid Timothy in judging character, to avoid the danger mentioned in verse 22. In testing men as to their fitness for office, he must remember that there are two classes of sins, open and hidden” (Hiebert p. 105).

    “For others, their sins follow after”: To follow close upon, “dog their steps” (Deuteronomy 28:15; Numbers 32:23). “There are obvious sinners, whose sins are clearly leading to their own disaster and to their own punishment; and there are secret sinners who behind a front of unimpeachable rectitude live a life that is in essence evil and ugly. What man cannot see, God does see, as someone said, ‘God does not pay every Friday night’” (Barclay p. 139).

    The application would be that Timothy does not need to feel guilty if an elder turns out to be less that he appeared. God does not demand omniscience of Timothy, thus he would not be devastated when what appeared to be a faithful Christian is anything but that.


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    Dunagan, Mark. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 5:24". "Mark Dunagan Commentaries on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dun/1-timothy-5.html. 1999-2014.

    E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

    men"s. App-123.

    open beforehand. Greek. prodelos. Only here, 1 Timothy 5:20, and Hebrews 7:14.

    going before. See 1 Timothy 1:18.

    to. App-104.

    judgment. App-177. Some are notoriously unfit; the unfitness of others is not manifest till they are tested.


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    Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 5:24". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/1-timothy-5.html. 1909-1922.

    Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

    Some men's sins are open beforehand, going before to judgment; and some men they follow after.

    Two kinds of sins:

    (1) Those palpably notorious (so prodeeloi (Greek #4271), "open beforehand;" Hebrews 7:14, "evident;" literally, 'before' the eyes) further explained as "going before to judgment;" and

    (2) Those which follow after the men ("some men they (i:e., their sins) follow after," as a shadow following the body) - namely, not going beforehand, lowly accusing, but hidden until the judgment: so 1 Timothy 5:25, the good works are of two classes: those palpably manifest ('manifest beforehand'), and those "that are otherwise" - i:e., not palpably manifest.

    Both alike "cannot be hid" the former class, the bad and good, are manifest already; the latter, in the case of both, are not manifest now, but shall be so at the last judgment.

    Going before to judgment - as heralds: crying sins, which accuse their perpetrator. The connection is: He had enjoined Timothy (1 Timothy 5:20), 'rebuke them that sin before all;' and (1 Timothy 5:22), "neither be partaker of other men's sins," by ordaining ungodly men; having, by a digression at "keep thyself pure," guarded against an error of Timothy in fancying purity consisted in asceticism, and having exhorted him to use wine for strengthening him, he returns to his being vigorous as an overseer in rebuking sin, whether in presbyters or people, and in avoiding participation in men's sins by ordaining ungodly candidates. He says, therefore, there are two classes of sins, as thee are two classes of good works: those palpably manifest and those not so; the former are those on which thou shouldest act decidedly at once, when it is needful to rebuke in general, or to ordain ministers in particular: as to the latter, the final judgment alone can decide; however hidden now, they "cannot be hid" then. This could only be said of the final judgment (1 Corinthians 4:5 therefore, Alford's reference to Timothy's judgment in choosing elders is wrong): all judgments before then are fallible. Timothy can only be responsible if he connive at manifest sins; not that those that are otherwise shall escape judgment at last: just as in good works, he can only be responsible for taking into account in his judgments those patent to all; not those secret good works which nevertheless will not remain hidden at the final judgment.


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    Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 5:24". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/1-timothy-5.html. 1871-8.

    The Bible Study New Testament

    An plain to see. This refers back to 1 Timothy 5:22. Since keeping an unfit man in a place of service makes the one who appoints him responsible, in a sense, Timothy may have been very afraid he might make a mistake in such things. "In the case of some, it will be such an "open and shut case," that you will have no doubts about it. Their sins will clearly disqualify them. With others, their sins are hidden, and only time will reveal them. For this reason, don't be in any hurry to appoint people."


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    Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 5:24". "The Bible Study New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/1-timothy-5.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

    Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

    (24) Some men’s sins are open beforehand, going before to judgment; and some men they follow after.—The preceding verse was parenthetic, and suggested by his fears lest the effect of his direction to his son in the faith to keep himself pure might lead Timothy to the practice of a useless and unhealthy asceticism. St. Paul now returns and closes the subject on which he had been instructing his representative at Ephesus. He tells him, in his choice of men to fill the public positions in the Church of God—in his public inquiries into their conduct and teaching—in his inquiries respecting sinners, who, having forfeited their position as members of the community, were seeking re-admission into church fellowship, not to forget there were two classes of sins: the one class public and open, heralds, so to speak, of the judgment to follow. In the case of men sinning thus, the church’s chief pastor would have no difficulty in determining upon his course of action. But there was another class of sins—silent and, as far as public and general knowledge went, unknown—only published after judgment had been given. To rightly estimate such characters will require much care and penetration, and this will be part of Timothy’s work. The judgment (krisis) here mentioned is that of Timothy as shown in the careful selection of candidates for ordination—in determining what sinners are fit for restoration to church fellowship—in pronouncing sentence in the matter of accused presbyters.


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    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 5:24". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/1-timothy-5.html. 1905.

    Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

    Some men's sins are open beforehand, going before to judgment; and some men they follow after.
    Jeremiah 2:34; Acts 1:16-20; 5:1-11; 8:18; Galatians 5:19-21; 2 Timothy 4:10; 2 Peter 2:20,21

    Copyright Statement
    These files are public domain.
    Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

    Bibliography
    Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 5:24". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/1-timothy-5.html.

    1 Timothy 5:24-25 Some men"s sins are open beforehand, going before to judgment; and some [men] they follow after. Likewise also the good works [of some] are manifest beforehand; and they that are otherwise cannot be hid.

    These verses seem to be linked to the thought of laying on of hands quickly.

    Sin and good works can come before or after getting to know a person.

    If sin appears while you are observing the man then the church should judge him according to church discipline. That sort of man has no business in church leadership.

    Barnes mentions of this judgment: "Their character is well understood. There is no need of waiting for the day of judgment to know what they are. Their deeds so precede their own appearance at the judgment-bar, that the record and the verdict can be made up before they arrive there, and there will be scarcely need even of the formality of a trial. The meaning here is, that there could be no doubt about the character of such men, and Timothy should not be accessory to their being introduced into the office of the ministry. "

    In others the sin will follow at a later time after you have given your approval.

    This seems to be an encouragement to be very careful in okaying men for the ministry.

    The good works are usually up front and never hidden so you can usually view their works and know the type of person that they are.

    The thought may be here that some sins are just outward and they will be easy to view. Other sin is inward, such as lust, and that sin can go unnoticed for some time before it becomes known and outward.

    Numbers 32:23 states, "...be sure your sin will find you out."

    Another truth that comes forth is that good works do not go unnoticed.

    It was once said of a man, "He always gave freely the milk of kindness but always managed to rattle the bottles."

    You don"t have to rattle the bottles to be noticed, just do the good works and people will notice.

    I would like to finish this study with three illustrations of men that were less than upright and pure. These three men were leaders in their own right within fundamental Christianity in the early 1990"s. All three had been ordained by various churches and were currently in ministries. These men were all involved in the ministry of training young men and women for the ministry, and all were active in local churches in a teaching/preaching ministry.

    One must wonder about other areas of their lives if they so blatantly disregarded right living in this area.

    The first man had written a book which was being published by the company I worked for. I picked up a copy as I was making my rounds and read the forward. Within the forward he mentioned that he had picked up much of the information over the years and that he did not know where all of it came from. He apologized for not giving credit to those he had taken from. This man was pastor of one of the largest fundamental churches in the Midwest, yet he had been teaching other men"s materials as his own for years and now was publishing some of it without giving credit - that to most is theft.

    The second man was one of my teachers in graduate school. He had given extensive notes to the class and I had been quoting him in my theology. While writing I always attempt to give proper credit for quotes. When I decided to publish the work, I was writing all of the authors and publishers to gain permission to quote.

    I wrote to my former professor and asked if it would be okay to use a few quotes from his notes and listed the items quoted.

    His reply totally shocked me. He told me that most of his notes were from other men and asked that I not use the quotes. This from a pastor and leader in one of our more conservative fundamental movements.

    The third man was president of a Bible college. He had been asked to give some seminars in the school where I taught. The man was well known for his seminars in the Midwest and had presented them many times around the country.

    It was the practice of the school to tape all messages so that students could take copies for future reference or send them to family and friends.

    Faith was in the office duplicating some of his messages when he walked in. He became very concerned when he found out that we were making copies of the message tapes.

    He finally admitted to Faith that the information he had been sharing as his own great wisdom was in fact gleaned from the ministries of other men. He asked that the tapes not leave campus.

    I trust that as you walk life"s pathways, that you make a more pointed attempt to keep yourself holier, than these men did.

    Outwardly these men were considered Godly men yet in their secret world they were ungodly.

    They ought not have been in positions of leadership! Someone laid hands on too quickly.


    Copyright Statement
    Copyright 2008. Used by Permission. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopy, recording or otherwise without the prior permission of the author, except as provided by U.S.A. copyright laws. Do feel free to make copies for friends that might be interested as long as you do not make profit from the copies. This is God's work and I don't want anyone to profit from it in a material way.

    Bibliography
    Derickson, Stanley. "Commentary on 1 Timothy 5:24". "Stanley Derickson - Notes on Selected Books". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sdn/1-timothy-5.html.


    Lectionary Calendar
    Tuesday, August 14th, 2018
    the Week of Proper 14 / Ordinary 19
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