Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

2 Kings 10:15

Now when he had departed from there, he met Jehonadab the son of Rechab coming to meet him; and he greeted him and said to him, "Is your heart right, as my heart is with your heart?" And Jehonadab answered, "It is." Jehu said, "If it is, give me your hand." And he gave him his hand, and he took him up to him into the chariot.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Enthusiasm;   Hand;   Homicide;   Jehu;   Jonadab;   Rechab;   Zeal, Religious;   Thompson Chain Reference - Association-Separation;   Contact;   Hand, Divine;   Hands;   Jehonadab;   Jonadab;   Personal Contact;   Right;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Hands, the;   Rechabites;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Jonadab;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Jehu;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Hand;   Jehonadab;   Jezreel, Valley of;   Jonadab;   Rechab;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Hand;   Jehonadab;   Rechab;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Gestures;   Hand;   Jehonadab;   Rechabites;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Jehonadab;   Jehu;   Nazirite;   Rechab, Rechabites;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Oaths;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Jonadab ;   Rechab ;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Hand;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Jehonadab;   Jehu;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Jehon'adab;   Re'chab;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Hand;   Jehu;   Rechabites;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Gesture;   Jehonadab;   Jehu;   Nurse;   Rechab;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Nazarite;   Rechabites;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Jehonadab the son of Rechab - For particulars concerning this man, his ancestry, and posterity, see the notes on Jeremiah 35 (note).

Is thine heart right - With me, in the prosecution of a reform in Israel; as my heart is with thy heart in the true religion of Jehovah, and the destruction of Baal?

It is - I wish a reform in the religion of the country; I am his friend who shall endeavor to promote it.

Give me thine hand - This has been generally considered as exacting a promise from Jehonadab; but does it mean any more than his taking him by the hand, to help him to step into his chariot, in which Jehu was then sitting? Jehonadab was doubtless a very honorable man in Israel; and by carrying him about with him in his chariot, Jehu endeavored to acquire the public esteem. "Jehu must be acting right, for Jehonadab is with him, and approves his conduct."

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Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on 2 Kings 10:15". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/2-kings-10.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Jehonadab (compare the margin) belonged to the tribe of the Kenites, one of the most ancient in Palestine Genesis 15:19. Their origin is unknown, but their habits were certainly those of Arahs. Owing to their connection with Moses (Numbers 24:21 note), they formed a friendship with the Israelites, accompanied them in their wanderings, and finally receivcd a location in the wilderness of Judah Judges 1:16. The character of this chief, Jonadab, is best seen in the rule which he established for his descendants Jeremiah 35:6-7 - a rule said to be still observed at the present day. It would seem that he sympathised strongly with Jehu‘s proceedings, and desired to give the countenance of his authority, such as it was, to the new reign. According to the Hebrew text, Jehu “saluted” (or blessed) Jehonadab. According to the Septuagint and Josephus, Jehonadab “saluted” (or blessed) the king. Further, the Hebrew text runs - “And Jehonadab answered, It is, it is. Give (me) thy hand. And he gave (him) his hand, and took him up to him into the chariot.” Our translators appear to have preferred the Septuagint; but the Hebrew is more graphic. Jehu was no doubt glad to have the countenance of Jehonadab on his public entrance into Samaria. The ascetic had a reputation for sanctity, which could not fail to make his companionship an advantage to the but half-established monarch.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on 2 Kings 10:15". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/2-kings-10.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

2 Kings 10:15

Is thine heart right.

The right state of the heart

For the sake of order I bring the subject before you under four general heads of discourse. If our hearts be right, they will be right.

I. If the state of our hearts be right, then will they be right with God. A heart truly right with God implies,

1. That we venerate Him.

2. That we entirely submit ourselves to Him.

3. That by the cultivation of a devotional spirit, we maintain a sacred intercourse with Him.

We ask, then, Is thine heart right with God? Does it venerate Him? submit to Him? aspire after Him? You know the state of your own heart: Answer these inquiries as before God.

II. If our hearts be right, they are right with Christ. Till this be the case, the heart cannot ever be right with God.

1. When it accepts His sacrifice as the only ground on which to claim the remission of sins.

2. The heart is not right with Christ unless it loves Him.

3. When the heart is right with Christ, there is an habitual confidence in His intercession. Is thine heart thus right with Christ? Dost thou thus believe in Him? thus love Him? thus habitually confide in Him?

III. If our hearts be right, they are right with the Church of Christ. I mean, by this expression, the whole company of his militant and professing people here on earth; the spiritual Israel of God. Now, when the heart is in a right state,

1. The Church is avowed.

2. Its members are loved.

3. When our heart is right with the Church, we feel that we are identified with it. Here, too, let me ask, “Is thine heart right?” Dost thou avow thyself a member of Christ’s church? love its members? identify thyself with its interests? and labour to promote them?

IV. If the heart be light, it will be right with itself. There are strange oppositions and divisions in the heart; and this cannot be a right state of it There is opposition between conviction and choice. Many know the good, who choose it not, who make no effort for its attainment. There is opposition between Will and power. To Will is indeed present with them, but how to perform they find not. There is the struggle between the flesh and the spirit; the counteraction of graces by opposite evils There is the stunted growth. The seed is at least so far choked, that there is no fruit unto perfection. When it is thus with us, the heart is manifestly wrong. When it is right, it exerts an enlightened sway over the whole man: All its powers are in obedient order, all its graces fruitful and abundant. We therefore again ask, Is thine heart right With itself? Is it divided, and therefore faulty? or has God united it, that it may fear His name?

1. Perhaps our heart is wrong.

2. Perhaps it is in part right.

3. Know and use the means by which this may be accomplished.

Exercise faith in the Saviour, live in habitual watchfulness and self-denial, “keeping the heart with all diligence, for that out of it are the issues of life.” (R. Watson.)

Is thine heart right

Those were the proud words of one, who little knew what was in his own heart. But they contain an inquiry, of no small importance to every fallen child of Adam. “Is thine heart right”--

I. In its views of religious truth? Has it formed a right judgment concerning thy natural condition, as a sinner against God; and respecting the way of bettering that condition? I am aware that many regard this as the proper business of the understanding, rather than of the heart. Hence they excuse their erroneous views in religion, by pleading want of ability to discover the truth. Hence the poor think it enough to say, “I am no scholar!” And persons, far Wiser than they in worldly wisdom, have pretended, “that a man is not responsible for what he believes, and that it is not his fault if he be mistaken.” On the one hand we are informed, that “with the heart man believeth unto righteousness.”

II. In its dependance? On what is it actually resting, as the ground of its hopes for eternity? “Other foundation can no man lay, than that is laid, which is Jesus Christ.”

III. In its choice? In what does it delight? what does it esteem to be the chief good?

IV. In its intentions and purposes? Having discovered the truth--rested on Christ--chosen the Lord for your welcome portion--what is now your object in life?

V. In its actual influence on thy conduct? Many, alas, woefully deceive themselves, by forming excellent resolutions--never to be put in practice. In such a ease, let self-flattery pretend what it may, the heart must be wrong. Remember, in conclusion, that if the heart be not right, nothing else is right. Even the better parts of your conduct, for want of this, will still be offensive in the sight of that God, who “seeth not as man seeth.” If you be conscious that your heart is not right, then remember that “God is greater than your heart, and knoweth all things.” It may be safe from human scrutiny--but not from his eye. If you would have your heart set right, bring it to God in faith and prayer. He will give you a “new” one--a “clean” one--a “perfect” one. (J. Jowett, M. A.)

A right heart

The first theory of the Gospel is, that the heart of man is all wrong. God said to Noah, “The imagination of man’s heart is evil from his youth” (Genesis 8:21). David says, “They are all gone aside; they are altogether become filthy.” Jeremiah says, “The heart is deceitful above all things, and desperately wicked.” Christ gives some terrible pictures of the human heart; He likened it to a sepulchre full of corruption.

I. A heart that is right is a trustful heart. The Christian life begins With faith in Christ, and is all through sustained by faith in Christ. Faith in Christ leads the anxious, inquiring heart into rest. A triple foundation: the promises of God, the witness of the Spirit, and the testimony of experience.

II. A heart that is right is a consecrated heart. A heart that is not wholly Christ’s cannot be right Consecration is the way to purity. It is the full surrender of ourselves to God. The giving up of everything that would hinder the Divine life in the soul. Many Christians are not happy because there is something they keep back from God. There must be a giving up of self. The whole question is, self or Christ. There is a voice coming from Calvary’s Cross, which tells us we must not live unto ourselves, but unto Him who loved us, and gave Himself for us.

III. A heart that is right is a pure heart. The Saviour’s teaching was always toward the heart. Out of the heart are the issues of life. He said little about the intellect; but a great deal about the heart.

IV. A heart that is right is at rest. That which the soul needs is rest; it needs to feel that it is God’s, and that God is its possession. (C. E. Crosthwaite.)

The evil heart

Samuel Marsden, the New Zealand missionary, well known for his piety and humility, when told one day by a friend how he was slandered, exclaimed: “Sir, these men do not know the worst. Why, sir, if I were to walk through the streets with my heart laid bare, the very boys would pelt me!”

Heart right

“When Sir Walter Raleigh had laid his head upon the block,” says an eloquent divine, “he was asked by the executioner whether it lay aright. Whereupon, with the calmness of a hero and the faith of a Christian, he returned an answer, the power of which we all shall feel when our head is tossing and turning on death’s uneasy pillow,--‘It matters little, my friend, how the head lies providing the heart be right:’” (R. Steele.)

Purity of heart

It does not consist in the external exercise of religion; the heart does not always write itself upon the outward actions. These may shine and glister, while that in the meantime may be noisome and impure. In a pool you may see the uppermost water clear, but if you cast your eye to the bottom, you shall see that to be dirt and mud. To rate a man’s internals by his externals, and what works in his breast by what appears in his face, is a rule very fallible. For we often see specious practices spread over vile and base principles; as a rotten, unwholesome body may be clothed with the finest silks. There are often many leagues’ distance between a man’s behaviour and his heart. (R. South.)

Acquaintance with our own heart

I remember once holding on by the ground on the top of Vesuvius, and looking full into the crater all swirling with sulphurous flames. Have you ever looked into your hearts like that, and seen the wreathing smoke and the flashing fire that are there? (A. Maclaren, D. D.)

Give me thine hand.--

Christian hand-shaking

Jehu had been making an exterminating assault upon the idolatry of his day, and Jehonadab conies out to offer him congratulation. They meet half-way: and one exclaims to the other, in all the ardour of friendly recognition, “Give me thy hand!” The mode of salutation is different in different countries. In some lands they kneel before the visitor. In some, fall on their faces; in others they stand upright and give a slight bend to the neck. But when two persons, believing in the same thing, and working for the same object, and trusting in the same God, and hoping for the same heaven, come face to face, look each other in the eye, and cross palms with a tight grip, and shake hands, that is human equality and Christian brotherhood. I fall down before no man in obeisance: I gaze down upon no man in arrogance; but, looking into the face of friend and foe, I am ready to exclaim in the words of Jehu to Jehonadab, “Give me thy hand!” Come, now, and let us get near to each other in a plain, loving, Christian talk. My brother! my sister! my child!

I. Let us join hands in Christian welcome.

II. Again: let us cross hands in congratulation.

III. Again: let us join hands of Christian sympathy.

IV. Again: let us join hands in a bargain. (T. De Witt Talmage.)

The hand-grip of loyalty

On drove Jehu, determined to get the lines of government into his hands and make sure of his standing ground. On his way to Samaria, the true capital of Israel (for Jezreel was the seat of the summer palace only), he met Jehonadab, the son of Rechab, on the highway. Now Jehonadab was a respectable, conservative sort of a citizen, with a good name for quiet steady purpose, the kind of man who would be of the greatest help to Jehu if only he were thoroughly committed to him and could be counted upon for loyal support. Jehu did not purpose to be in any doubt as to where people stood. He must know whether they were for him or against him. One cannot help but admire that in Jehu. There was no neutral ground in him, and he would not endure it in others. So when he met Jehonadab he stopped his horses and saluted him, and said, “Is thine heart right, as my heart is with thy heart?” And Jehonadab looked straight back into his eyes and said, “It is.” Jehu said, “If it be, give me thine hand.” And as Jehonadab reached out his hand Jehu took it with a warm, strong grip that lifted him right up into his chariot beside him, and they drove on together in the young king’s chariot to Samaria. From this story of Jehu there are some pertinent and helpful lessons to be drawn.

1. God’s call is personal. When the young prophet came to Jehu, and standing before the group of captains said he had a message for one of them, and Jehu asked which one, the prophet answered, “To thee, O captain. It was a personal message, and when Jehu followed him away he knew nothing except that he was following the prophet of the Lord God to receive a message from God, and thus he was called to His kingdom. So God sends personal messages to every one of us. The call to salvation is personal to you. God has made us as individuals, Each has his own personal mind and heart, his own personal needs, his individual requirements. Each of us has ability and talent that are peculiar to ourselves.

2. There is no peace save in goodness. When King Joram came out to meet Jehu he was very anxious to have peace, but Jehu could still feel the oil of God upon his head and hear the words of the prophet in his ears commanding him to stamp out the wickedness that had devastated the land. So Jehu answered that there could be no peace while Jezebel with her witchcrafts and her wickedness lived.

3. Only by giving our whole selves to God and throwing our full force on the Lord’s side can we please Him. See Jehu as the wicked king turns to fly. A weak turning back now will mean failure and overthrow. He has been called upon for serious and solemn work, and he must not hesitate. Many of our attacks on evil are of no avail, and the arrows fall harmless against the enemies of God and man, because we pull with a faint heart and a weak hand.

4. We must choose sides for or against Jesus. We cannot be neutral. When Jehu stood under the window of the summer palace in Jezreel, with painted Jezebel leaning out in accusation, he cried aloud, so that all the officers of the palace could hear, “Who is on my side? Who?” There could be no neutrality after that. They had to choose between Jezebel and Jehu, and it did not take them long to make the choice. They east out that old painted viper who had brought such sorrow on the land. So our King Jesus, who has the right to be your King, is saying.to you, “Who is on My side? Who?” You must choose between your sins and Jesus

5. It is loyal hearts that Christ wants. Everything else is secondary. “Are you loyal to Me?” that is the question of Jesus. When Jehu met Jehona-dab he said to himself, “Ah, there is Jehonadab. A very nice kind of a man. He could be worth a great deal to me. But it all depends on whether he is loyal or not. If his heart is with me, he is worth more than a regiment of soldiers; but if he is not for me, loyally, he might do me a great deal of damage.” So when he is close enough to Jehonadab he stops and calls to him, saying, “Jehonadab, is thine heart right, as my heart is with thy heart?” And Jehonadab looks back with honest eyes and says, “It is.” And Jehu answers, “If it be, give me thine hand.” And out comes the hand of the other man, and Jehu takes it in a great strong grip, and not only by the strength of his grasp, but by the look in his eyes, he makes Jehonadab know what he means. And he steps right up in the chariot, and rides on with the king in honour and peace. What a suggestive illustration is this of what Jesus Christ is saying to every one of you who have not yet given Him assurance of your earnest loyalty. He is knocking at the door of your heart. It is your heart He wants; your loyal and loving service. And He is saying to you, “If you will but make up your mind, if you will but open your heart to Me, if you will but give Me your loyal hand-grip, then we shall go on the way together.” Jehonadab was safe in the king’s chariot. You shall be safe when the King’s loving strong hand lifts you up in the chariot beside Himself and you ride onward in peace and honour towards heaven. (L. A. Banks, D.D)
.

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Bibliographical Information
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "2 Kings 10:15". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/2-kings-10.html. 1905-1909. New York.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

JEHU FORMED SOME KIND OF ALLIANCE WITH JEHONADAB

"And when he was departed thence, he lighted on Jehonadab the son of Rechab coming to meet him; and he saluted him, and said to him, Is thy heart right, as my heart is with thy heart? And Jehonadab answered, It is. If it be, give me thy hand. And he gave him his hand; and he took him up to him into the chariot. And he said, Come with me, and see my zeal for Jehovah. So they made him ride in the chariot. And when he came to Samaria, he smote all that remained unto Ahab in Samaria, till he had destroyed him, according to the word of Jehovah, which he spoke to Elijah."

(For a discussion of the unique sect of the Rechabites, see my commentary on Jeremiah 35.) These people lived in tents and clung tenaciously to the ancient and original worship of Israel, namely, the worship of Jehovah. They were not Israelites, but Kenites, and had accompanied Israel when they came up out of Egypt. They had a very good reputation among all Israelites for their piety and integrity; and Jehu's purpose here was that of associating with this reputable man Jehonadab, thus giving the general impression that the Rechabites were backing Jehu.

"Is thy heart right, as my heart is with thy heart" (2 Kings 10:14). The RSV is more readable, as follows: "Is your heart true to my heart, as my heart is to yours"?

"Come with me, and see my zeal for Jehovah" (2 Kings 10:16). This zeal for Jehovah which Jehu pretended to have was merely the cloak of his ambition. This is not the only time that God used a wicked man or an evil nation to punish wickedness.

"This was more than a casual meeting. The pledge and the handshake signified a formal coalition between Jehu and the Rechabites."[12]

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on 2 Kings 10:15". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/2-kings-10.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And when he was departed thence,.... From Betheked, or the shearing house:

he lighted on Jehonadab the son of Rechab coming to meet him; a Kenite, a descendant of Jethro, the father-in-law of Moses, a wise and good man, as appears by the laws and rules he gave to his posterity, who continued to the times of Jeremiah, and were then observant of them, Jeremiah 35:6 this good man hearing of Jehu's coming to the throne, and of his destruction of the idolatrous family of Ahab, and of his zeal for the worship of God, and against idolatry, came forth from his tent to meet him, and congratulate him upon it:

and he saluted him; Jonadab saluted Jehu, according to Abarbinel; or "blessed him"F18ויברכהו "et benedixit ei", V. L. Montanus. , wished him all happiness in his kingdom, and success in the reformation of it; though most understand it of Jehu's saluting Jonadab, which seems best to agree with the following:

and said to him, is thy heart right, as my heart is with thy heart? that is, hast thou the same cordial affection and sincere respect for me as I have for thee?

and Jehonadab answered, it is: to which some join the next clause, and read, "and it is"; which is doubling the answer, for the confirmation of it, as Kimchi says; though he also observes, that the latter may be interpreted as the answer of Jehu, by way of interrogation, "is it?":

then give me thine hand; and to the same purpose is our version:

if it be, and he gave him his hand; Jonadab gave Jehu his hand as a token of sincere friendshipF19"Ipse pater dextram Anchises", &c. Virgil. Aeneid. l. 3. prope finem. Vid. Servium in ib. Vid. Cornel. Nepot. Vit. Themistocl. l. 2. c. 8. & Datam. l. 14. c. 10. , and cordial respect, and for the confirmation of the covenant between them, as Ben Melech; who also observes, that Jehu might bid him give him his hand to help him up into the chariot, since it follows:

and he took him up to him into the chariot; to ride with him to Samaria; the company of such a man, so famous for wisdom and goodness, he knew would give him much countenance among the people, and sanction to what he did.

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Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 10:15". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/2-kings-10.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

And when he was departed thence, he lighted on Jehonadab the son of Rechab [coming] to meet him: and he g saluted him, and said to him, Is thine heart right, as my heart [is] with thy heart? And Jehonadab answered, It is. If it be, give [me] thine hand. And he gave [him] his hand; and he took him up to him into the chariot.

(g) For he feared God, and lamented the wickedness of those times: therefore Jehu was glad to join with him: of Rechab read (Jeremiah 35:2).
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on 2 Kings 10:15". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/2-kings-10.html. 1599-1645.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

The honorable testimony the Holy Ghost hath given of this man in another part of sacred scripture, demands our attention. The prophet Jeremiah speaks of him in great commendation as the honored father of the house of the Rechabites at a period distant from this above 300 years. And when we behold him coming out of his retirement to thank Jehu for his services to the Lord; it may serve to leach us that in the worst of times the Lord hath a seed that serve him in the earth, See Jeremiah 35:19.

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Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on 2 Kings 10:15". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/2-kings-10.html. 1828.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And when he was departed thence, he lighted on Jehonadab the son of Rechab coming to meet him: and he saluted him, and said to him, Is thine heart right, as my heart is with thy heart? And Jehonadab answered, It is. If it be, give me thine hand. And he gave him his hand; and he took him up to him into the chariot.

Rechab — A Kenite, 1 Chronicles 2:55, and a man of singular prudence and piety.

Coming — To congratulate with him, for the destruction of that wicked family; and to encourage him to proceed in fulfilling the will of God.

Him — Jehu saluted Jehonadab.

Is, … — Dost thou heartily approve of me, and my present proceedings.

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Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 10:15". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/2-kings-10.html. 1765.

Scofield's Reference Notes

Jehonadab

Called Jonadab, Jeremiah 35:6; Jeremiah 35:8; Jeremiah 35:10; Jeremiah 35:14; Jeremiah 35:16; Jeremiah 35:18; Jeremiah 35:19.

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These files are considered public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available in the Online Bible Software Library.
Bibliographical Information
Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on 2 Kings 10:15". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/2-kings-10.html. 1917.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

2 Kings 10:15 And when he was departed thence, he lighted on Jehonadab the son of Rechab [coming] to meet him: and he saluted him, and said to him, Is thine heart right, as my heart [is] with thy heart? And Jehonadab answered, It is. If it be, give [me] thine hand. And he gave [him] his hand; and he took him up to him into the chariot.

Ver. 15. He lighted on Jehonadab the son of Rechab.] A Kenite of Jethro’s stock, [1 Chronicles 2:55] famous for his piety and holy life, and highly esteemed of the people. See Jeremiah 35:6. Josephus saith, that he was of Jehu’s old acquaintance. Whether he were or not, now he desires his approbation, and therefore takes him along.

Is thine heart right, as my heart is?] Here he prefers himself before Jonadab; whereas sincerity is better conceited of another, suspicious of itself. See John 21:15.

And Jehonadab answered, It is.] Heb., It is and it is; i.e., Assuredly it is.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 10:15". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/2-kings-10.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

2 Kings 10:15

There is all the difference in the world between the ways in which the answer to this question is spoken; and there is only one way, only one meaning, in which it can be spoken honestly, as before God, from the ground of the heart.

I. There is, for instance, the careless, indifferent, frivolous answer, the answer of those who have hitherto resisted the grace of God, and who, finding that they can sin as yet with but little sorrow, neither know nor really care what religion means. "Is my heart right? Yes, I suppose so. If I am not particularly good, I am not particularly bad," and so on. Such an answer means nothing, or worse than nothing. In your "Yes" God reads "No." In your "My heart is right" He reads that it is "deceitful above all things and desperately wicked."

II. Take another answer, not, like the last, wholly hollow and insincere, but too impulsive, too confident. "Is thine heart right?" "Yes," another will say. "I do sincerely dislike what is bad, and I despise myself for the weakness with which I yielded to it. And I mean to be quite different now." This answer involves, not merely a weak wish, but a strong desire; not only a strong desire, but a resolute effort; not only even a resolute effort, but an intense and absorbing passion. A weak resolve, a half-resolve, a mere verbal resolve, a resolve made in your own strength—of what use is it? There is a deep-sighted proverb which says, "Hell is paved with good intentions."

III. "Is thine heart right?" Take one more answer. Some may answer carelessly, some presumptuously, but will not many answer in a deeper, humbler, sincerer, more serious spirit? "Though my life has not been always right," you will say, "yet I hope, I trust, that my heart is right. It is not hard. My own strength is weakness, my own righteousness is utter sin, but I lift up mine eyes unto the hills, whence cometh my help." "Make me to do the thing that pleaseth Thee, for Thou art my God. Let Thy loving Spirit lead me into the land of uprightness."

F. W. Farrar, In the Days of thy Youth, p. 179.


References: 2 Kings 10:15.—S. Baring-Gould, One Hundred Sermon Sketches, p. 161. 2 Kings 10:15, 2 Kings 10:16.—A. Edersheim, Elisha the Prophet, p. 298.

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Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on 2 Kings 10:15". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/2-kings-10.html.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

2 Kings 10:15. Jehonadab, the son of Rechab See the notes on Jeremiah 35 and Bedford's Script. Chronol. l. vi. c. 2. To give the hand, signifies to promise. When, therefore, we are told, that Jehu asked Jehonadab to give him his hand, we are not to suppose it was that he might assist him in getting up into the chariot, but that Jehonadab would give him an assurance that he would assist him in the prosecution of his designs. See Pilkington's Remarks, and Ezra 10:19.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on 2 Kings 10:15". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/2-kings-10.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Jehonadab the son of Rechab; a Kenite, 1 Chronicles 2:55, and a man of singular prudence and piety; as appears from this history, and from Jeremiah 35:6.

Coming to meet him, to congratulate with him for the destruction of that wicked family, and to encourage and advise him to proceed in fulfilling the will of God revealed to him.

He saluted him; Jehu saluted Jehonadab.

Is thine heart right, as my heart is with thy heart? dost thou heartily approve of and affect me, and my present proceedings, as my heart doth as sincerely cleave to thee as thine own heart doth?

Give me thine hand, as a sign of friendship and consent. See Galatians 2:9. These may be the words, either,

1. Of Jehu; and so here is an ellipsis, If it be, for And Jehu said, If it be. Compare 1 Kings 20:34. Or,

2. Of Jehonadab, who having said, It is, adds, If it be, i.e. if thine heart be with mine, as thou sayest it is, give me thine hand. But this the ellipsis is larger than the former. And it seems not so decent and proper for Jehonadab, a stranger and subject, to speak thus to the king, as for the king to say so to him.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 2 Kings 10:15". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/2-kings-10.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

15.Jehonadab the son of Rechab coming to meet him — The name is written Jonadab in Jeremiah 35:6; Jeremiah 35:10; Jeremiah 35:19. The house of Rechab were descendants of the Kenites, (1 Chronicles 2:55,) who journeyed with the Israelites through the wilderness, (Numbers 10:29,) and had settled in various parts of the land. Judges 1:16; Judges 4:11; 1 Samuel 15:6. This Jehonadab had brought all his father’s house to pledge themselves to abstain from wine, and to pursue the nomadic habits of their ancestors, and always dwell in tents. See Jeremiah 35. He was doubtless, therefore, well known in Israel as a man of great austerity; he had probably mourned over the prevailing idolatry, and now, hearing of what Jehu had done and said, he recognised in him a minister of Jehovah to execute judgment on the wicked house of Ahab, and went forth to meet him, and declare to him that his heart was with him in this ministry of judgment.

Is thine heart right, as my heart is with thy heart — Jehu was anxious to know if, in this bloody work, which he might well fear would not be very popular in Israel, he had the sympathy and approval of the distinguished pietist Jehonadab. To have his sympathy would be no small advantage to his cause. So he asks: Is thy heart really in sympathy with mine in this ministry of Divine judgment?

If it be — There is nothing in the Hebrew that answers well to if. It should be rendered: Jehonadab answered, It is, yea, it is; give me thy hand. Jehonadab did not leave Jehu to do all the talking. He first offered his hand to the conqueror, and then Jehu gave him his hand and took him into his chariot. So Jehu found him a helper in his work of doom.

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 2 Kings 10:15". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/2-kings-10.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Jonadab, a holy personage, Jeremias xxxv. 6. The Rechabites were a sort of religious, descended from Jethro and the Cinites. (Calmet) --- They dwelt in the country, and fed sheep, &c., Numbers x. 29. (Tirinus) --- John of Jerus.[Jerusalem?] (c. 25.) says that Jonadab was a disciple of Eliseus, and followed his institute in all things, except continency. (Menochius) --- Blessed him, wishing his peace and prosperity. (Menochius) --- It is not clear whether Jehu or Jonadab pronounced this blessing. (Haydock) --- Heart. Art thou friendly to my cause? --- Thy hand, in sign of concord, and to help him up into his chariot. (Calmet) --- It was of great consequence to obtain the approbation of a man (Haydock) who must have been so revered by the people. (Menochius) --- Jehu acted with the utmost policy. (Haydock)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on 2 Kings 10:15". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/2-kings-10.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Jehonadab. He was a Kenite (1 Chronicles 2:55), descendants of the father-in-law of Moses (Numbers 10:29. Judges 1:16; Judges 4:11. 1 Samuel 15:6). See Jer 35.

as = according as.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 2 Kings 10:15". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/2-kings-10.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And when he was departed thence, he lighted on Jehonadab the son of Rechab coming to meet him: and he saluted him, and said to him, Is thine heart right, as my heart is with thy heart? And Jehonadab answered, It is. If it be, give me thine hand. And he gave him his hand; and he took him up to him into the chariot.

Jehonadab the son of Rechab - (see the notes at 1 Chronicles 2:55.) A person who, from his piety and simple primitive manner of life (Jeremiah 35:1-19), was highly esteemed, and possessed great influence in the country. Jehu saw in a moment the advantage that his cause would gain from the friendship and countenance of this venerable man in the eyes of the people, and accordingly paid him the distinguished attention of inviting him to a seat in his chariot.

Give me thine hand - not simply to aid him in getting up, but for a far more significant and important purpose, the giving, or rather joining hands, being the recognized mode of striking a league or covenant (cf. Proverbs 6:1; Proverbs 11:15), as well as of testifying fealty to a new sovereign; accordingly, it is said he (Jehonadab) gave him (Jehu) his hand.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Kings 10:15". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/2-kings-10.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(15) Jehonadab the son of Rechab.—Comp. Jeremiah 35:6-11; and 1 Chronicles 2:55. Ewald supposes that the Rechabites were one of the new societies formed after the departure of Elijah for the active support of the true religion. Their founder in this sense was Jonadab, who, despairing of being able to practise the legitimate worship in the bosom of the community, retired into the desert with his followers, and, like Israel of old, preferred the rough life of tents to all the allurements of city life. Only unusual circumstances could induce them (like their founder, in the present instance) to re-enter the circle of common life. “The son of Rechab” means the Rechabite.

And he saluted him.—It was important to Jehu to be seen acting in concert with a man revered for sanctity, and powerful as a leader of the orthodox party.

Is thine heart right, as my heart is with thy heart?—The Hebrew is: Is there with thy heart right (sincerity)? but this does not agree with the rest of the question. Some MSS. omit the particle ’eth (“with”); but the original reading is probably preserved in the Vatican LXX: “Is thy heart right [i.e., sincere, honest] with my heart, as my heart with thy heart?” This secures a parallelism of expression. (Syriac: “Is there in thy heart sincerity, like that of my heart with thy heart?”)

If it be.—Literally, An it be (the old English idiom, i.e., and it be). Jehu makes this reply. The LXX. (Alex.) has: “And Jehu said;” Vulg., saith he; Syriac, “It is, and it is; and he said to him” (perhaps an accidental transposition).

Give me thine hand.—As a pledge of good faith and token of amity. Striking hands sealed a compact. (Comp. Isaiah 2:6; and Cheyne’s Note.)

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 10:15". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/2-kings-10.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And when he was departed thence, he lighted on Jehonadab the son of Rechab coming to meet him: and he saluted him, and said to him, Is thine heart right, as my heart is with thy heart? And Jehonadab answered, It is. If it be, give me thine hand. And he gave him his hand; and he took him up to him into the chariot.
lighted on
Heb. found.
13; 9:21; *margins
Jehonadab
Jeremiah 35:6,8,14-19
Jonadab
Rechab.
1 Chronicles 2:55
saluted
Heb. blessed.
Genesis 31:55; 47:7,10
Is thine heart right
1 Chronicles 12:17,18; John 21:15-17; Galatians 4:12
give me
Ezra 10:19; Ezekiel 17:18; Galatians 2:9
he took him
Jehu asked for the hand of Jehonadab not merely for the purpose of assisting him into the chariot, but that he might give him an assurance that he would assist him in the prosecution of his desires; for giving the hand is considered as a pledge of friendship and fidelity, or a form of entering into a contract, among all nations. Mr. Bruce relates, that when he entreated the protection of a sheikh, the great people who were assembled came, "and after joining hands, repeated a kind of prayer, of about two minutes long; by which they declared themselves and their children accursed, if ever they lifted their hands against me in the tell, (or field) in the desert, or on the river; or, in case that I, or mine, should fly to them for refuge, if they did not protect us at the risk of their lives, their families, and their fortunes, or, as they emphatically expressed it, to the death of the last male child among them." Another striking instance occurs in Ockley's History of the Saracens. Telha, just before he died, asked one of Ali's men if he belonged to the emperor of the faithful; and being informed that he did, "Give me then," said he, "your hand, that I may put mine in it, and by this action renew the oath of fidelity which I have already made to Ali."
Acts 8:31
Reciprocal: 1 Kings 20:33 - and he caused;  2 Kings 10:23 - Jehonadab;  Psalm 94:16 - rise up;  Jeremiah 35:2 - the house;  Lamentations 5:6 - given

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 2 Kings 10:15". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/2-kings-10.html.