Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

2 Kings 10:29

However, as for the sins of Jeroboam the son of Nebat, which he made Israel sin, from these Jehu did not depart, even the golden calves that were at Bethel and that were at Dan.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Beth-El;   Calf;   Inconsistency;   Intolerance, Religious;   Religion;   Rulers;   Thompson Chain Reference - Beth-El;   Calves, Jeroboam's;   False;   Golden Calves;   Idolatry;   Images;   Jehu;   Worship, False;   Worship, True and False;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Calves of Jeroboam;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Samaria, samaritans;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Gods and Goddesses, Pagan;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Jehu;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Bethel;   Calf Worship;   Hezekiah;   Kings, the Books of;   Old Testament;   Shechem (1);   Holman Bible Dictionary - Golden Calf;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Jehu;   Sin;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Jehu ;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Bethel;   Jehu;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Beth'el;   Je'hu;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Calf;   Jehu;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Kingdom of Israel;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Calf, Golden;   Jehu;   Judah, Territory of;   Kitto Biblical Cyclopedia - Bethel;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Beth-El;   Calf-Worship;  

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

To abolish the calf-worship was a thought which had probably never occurred to Jehu. He had religious feeling enough, and patriotism enough, to detest the utterly debasing Astarte worship; but the pure worship of Yahweh was altogether beyond and above him.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on 2 Kings 10:29". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/2-kings-10.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

THE SACRED WRITER'S APPRAISAL OF JEHU'S WORK

"Howbeit from the sins of Jeroboam the son of Nebat, wherewith he made Israel to sin, Jehu departed not from after them, to wit, the golden calves that were in Bethel, and that were in Dan. And Jehovah said unto Jehu, Because thou hast done well in that which is right in mine eyes, and hast done unto the house of Ahab according to all that was in my heart, thy sons of the fourth generation shall sit on the throne of Israel. But Jehu took no heed to walk in the law of Jehovah, the God of Israel, with all his heart: he departed not from the sins of Jeroboam, wherewith he made Israel to sin."

This is a tragic appraisal. Honeycutt expressed surprise that, "The Deuteronomic editor limited his summary of Jehu's reign to seven words (2 Kings 10:28);"[19] In fact, the passage contradicts the possibility that any "Deuteronomic editor" ever had anything to do with it. The mythical `Deuteronomic editor' of the critical schools would certainly have been far more appreciative of Jehu's work than what is indicated here. As Josephus tells us, the prophets of God are the authors of the historical books.

"Thy sons of the fourth generation shall sit on the throne of Israel" (2 Kings 10:30). It is related here that God said this to Jehu, yet we can hardly suppose that God appeared directly to such an evil man. "This prophecy was fulfilled in Jehoahaz, Joash, and Jeroboam II."[20] God's speaking to Jehu in such a prophecy, "Probably came via the mouth of Elisha."[21]

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on 2 Kings 10:29". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/2-kings-10.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Howbeit from the sins of Jeroboam the son of Nebat, who made Israel to sin,.... Which is the common character given of that king, a blot never to be wiped off:

Jehu departed not from after them, to wit, the golden calves that were in Bethel, and that were in Dan: he did not abstain from the worship of them, partly because he might not think it idolatry, because God was worshipped in them; hence he calls the worshippers of the calves the servants of the Lord, 2 Kings 10:23, and partly that he might not displease the princes of the people of Israel, who generally gave in to the worship of them; but chiefly lest the kingdom of Israel should return to the house of David, the worship of the calves being a piece of state policy, to keep them from going to Jerusalem to worship, lest thereby they should be drawn off from their allegiance to the king of Israel.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 10:29". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/2-kings-10.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Howbeit from the sins of Jeroboam … Jehu departed not from after them — Jehu had no intention of carrying his zeal for the Lord beyond a certain point, and as he considered it impolitic to encourage his subjects to travel to Jerusalem, he re-established the symbolic worship of the calves.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Kings 10:29". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/2-kings-10.html. 1871-8.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

What a sad account is this! Though Jehu had grace to destroy Baal, he had not virtue to resist the golden calves of idolatry. Alas! what is man in his highest attainments! Oh! dearest Lord Jesus, where shall we look for perfection but to thee! Be thou my righteousness, wisdom, sanctification; for in thee I have all things.

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Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on 2 Kings 10:29". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/2-kings-10.html. 1828.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Howbeit from the sins of Jeroboam the son of Nebat, who made Israel to sin, Jehu departed not from after them, to wit, the golden calves that were in Bethel, and that were in Dan.

Jehu departed not — So that it is plain, his religion was but superficial: otherwise it would not have given way to his policy.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 10:29". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/2-kings-10.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

2 Kings 10:29 Howbeit [from] the sins of Jeroboam the son of Nebat, who made Israel to sin, Jehu departed not from after them, [to wit], the golden calves that [were] in Bethel, and that [were] in Dan.

Ver. 29. Howbeit from the sins of Jeroboam … Jehu departed not.] Because if he had, it might have cost him his kingdom, to the settling whereof he had a hawk’s eye in all his reformations. Principes regionem potius quam religionem quaerunt, saith Chemnitius. It is said (a) that Selymus, the great Turk, and Hismael, the Persian, did, under the colour and zeal of their religion, as they would have it, both pretend just causes of war; although their evil dissembled ambitious desires plainly declared unto the world, that they both shot at one and the same mark: namely, by confirming their power and strength, to extend the bounds of their great empires.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 10:29". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/2-kings-10.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Jehu departed not from after them: herein he discovers his hypocrisy, that he follows God as far as his interest would permit; namely, in destroying the house of Ahab, and the worship of Baal, but no further; for he still resolves to keep up the worship of the calves; partly lest he should disoblige and irritate his own nobles and subjects, who had been long inured, and were heartily affected to it; and partly lest he should open a door for his people to return to their obedience to the house of David. And his sin and folly is the more inexcusable, both because he durst not trust that God with the keeping of his kingdom, of whose power, and faithfulness, and kindness to him he had such ample experience in his giving him the kingdom; and because he had so great and uncontrollable a power in the matters of religion; having first pretended, and seemed to set up, the worship of Baal with all his might, and then destroying it with no less vehemency, none daring to mutter against him in either case; and because the house of David, and kingdom of Judah, his competitor, now was, and was likely to be, in a feeble and declining condition, and much more likely to fall into his hands, than that his kingdom should come into theirs.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 2 Kings 10:29". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/2-kings-10.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

JEHU’S SINS, MISFORTUNES, AND DEATH, 2 Kings 10:29-36.

29.Howbeit — While the Scripture history makes prominent the fact that Jehu was God’s instrument to punish the wicked house of Ahab, and overthrow his dynasty, it conceals not his shortcomings and his sins. Jehu, as Kitto very justly remarks, “was one of those decisive, terrible, ambitious, yet prudent, calculating, and passionless men, whom God from time to time raises up to change the fate of empires and to execute his judgments on the earth. He boasted of his zeal — ’Come and see my zeal for the Lord’ — but at the bottom it was zeal for Jehu. His zeal was great so long as it led to acts which squared with his own interests, but it cooled marvellously when required to take a direction in his judgment less favourable to them.”

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 2 Kings 10:29". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/2-kings-10.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

2 Kings 10:29. Jehu departed not from them — He was partial in his reformation, and did not put away all the evil, because his heart was not right with God. He departed from the sins of Ahab, but not from the sins of Jeroboam: discarded Baal, but adhered to the calves. The worship of Baal was indeed the greater evil, and more heinous in the sight of God, but the worship of the calves was a great evil; and true religion not only implies conversion from gross sin, but from all sin, and not only from false gods, but from false modes of worshipping the true God. The worship of Baal, being upheld by the house of Ahab, also contributed to uphold that house, the numerous ministers of that idolatry being, of course, engaged to support the family which supported them, and with which they must stand or fall; hence Jehu could easily part with that worship, and labour to destroy it; but the worship of the calves was a politic idolatry, begun and kept up for reasons of state, to prevent the return of the ten tribes to the house of David, and therefore Jehu clave to it. But true religion is not only a conversion from those sins which are hostile to our secular interests, but from those that appear to be friendly to them; in forsaking which is the great trial, whether we can deny ourselves For God, and trust in him.

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on 2 Kings 10:29". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/2-kings-10.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Dan. This wicked policy, which was designed to prevent his subjects from submitting again to the kings of Juda, proved his ruin.

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on 2 Kings 10:29". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/2-kings-10.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

made Israel to sin. See note on 1 Kings 14:16.

to wit = namely.

in Dan. See 1 Kings 12:29, 1 Kings 12:30, and compare Genesis 49:17.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 2 Kings 10:29". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/2-kings-10.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Howbeit from the sins of Jeroboam the son of Nebat, who made Israel to sin, Jehu departed not from after them, to wit, the golden calves that were in Bethel, and that were in Dan. Howbeit from the sins of Jeroboam. Jehu had no intention of carrying his zeal for the Lord beyond a certain point, and so be considered it impolitic to encourage big subjects to travel to Jerusalem, he re-established the symbolic worship of the calves. Had Jehu resolved on putting the law into execution against idolaters (Deuteronomy 17:2-5), instead of adopting the deceptive, cruel part he did, he would have acted the part of a constitutional king; and had he, in the integrity of his heart, prosecuted the work of religious reformation thus begun by demolishing images, and restoring the pure worship of Yahweh, it is probable that the national degeneracy might have been arrested, or at least retarded; but be deemed it expedient to follow the policy of Jeroboam in reviving the calf-symbols at Beth-el and Dan, and in so doing, he showed himself unequal to the demands of the time; he failed to realize the ends for which he had been anointed king.

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Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Kings 10:29". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/2-kings-10.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(29) Howbeit from the sins of Jeroboam.—Comp. 1 Kings 12:28, seq., 1 Kings 15:26; 1 Kings 15:30; 1 Kings 15:34. Jehu maintained the worship at Bethel and Dan on the same grounds of state policy as the kings who preceded him.

Howbeit.—Only; the word constantly used by the redactor to qualify his estimate of the conduct of the kings. (Comp. 2 Kings 12:3; 2 Kings 14:4; 2 Kings 15:4.) The verse is, therefore, a parenthetic qualification of the approval implied in 2 Kings 10:28.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 10:29". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/2-kings-10.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Howbeit from the sins of Jeroboam the son of Nebat, who made Israel to sin, Jehu departed not from after them, to wit, the golden calves that were in Bethel, and that were in Dan.
A. M. 3120-3148. B.C. 884-856. the sins
13:2,11; 14:24; 15:9,18,24,28; 17:22; 1 Kings 12:28-30; 13:33,34; 14:16
made Israel
Genesis 20:9; Exodus 32:21; 1 Samuel 2:24; Mark 6:24-26; 1 Corinthians 8:9-13; Galatians 2:12,13
the golden calves
Exodus 32:4; Hosea 8:5,6; 10:5; 13:2
in Beth-el
1 Kings 12:29
Reciprocal: 2 Kings 10:31 - he departed;  2 Kings 13:6 - departed;  2 Chronicles 1:17 - the kings;  Ezekiel 23:8 - whoredoms;  Hosea 1:4 - and I;  Hosea 8:2 - GeneralAmos 8:14 - sin

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Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 2 Kings 10:29". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/2-kings-10.html.