Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

2 Kings 16:1

In the seventeenth year of Pekah the son of Remaliah, Ahaz the son of Jotham, king of Judah, became king.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Ahaz;   Israel, Prophecies Concerning;   Remaliah;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Kings;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Ahaz;   Pekah;   Temple;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Assyria;   Judah, tribe and kingdom;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Pekah;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Ahaz;   Alliance;   Damascus;   Remaliah;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Assyria ;   Pekah ;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Ahaz;   Pekah;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Remali'ah;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Kingdom of Israel;   Kingdom of Judah;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Chronology of the Old Testament;  

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

THE WICKED REIGN OF AHAZ OVER JUDAH

Ahaz was one of the very worst of Judah's kings, only Manasseh and Ammon either reaching or exceeding his state of wickedness and rebellion against God. The full name of this king was Jehoahaz, the same as that of one of the kings of Israel (2 Kings 13:1), as revealed by the discovery of an ancient seal.[1] LaSor dated his reign from 732 to 716 B.C., with a co-regency from 735 B.C.[2]

THE GENERAL CHARACTER OF AHAZ'S REIGN

"In the seventeenth year of Pekah the son of Remaliah Ahaz the son of Jothan king of Judah began to reign. Twenty years old was Ahaz when he began to reign; and he reigned sixteen years in Jerusalem: and he did not that which was right in the eyes of Jehovah his God like David his father. But he walked in the way of the king's of Israel, yea, and made his son to pass through the fire, according to the abomination of the nations, whom Jehovah cast out before the children of Israel. And he sacrificed and burnt incense in the high places, and on the hills, and under every green tree."

Three charges against Ahaz are made here. (1) He did not walk in the way of David; (2) he offered his son as a burnt offering to Molech; and (3) he participated in the licentious worship in the high places. The prior kings had winked at the old Canaanite worship still going on in the high places, but Ahaz was the first king of Judah actually to engage in it himself. There was nothing innocent about that worship in the high places. One should compare the phrase "under every green tree," as used here with the use of it in Jeremiah 3:6, where that prophet wrote that Israel had played the harlot "under every green tree." Yes, "harlotry" was used as a metaphor for worship of pagan gods, but the religious prostitutes were a vital part of that worship, and the words are also literally true.

"Twenty years old was Ahaz when he began to reign" (2 Kings 16:2). "Sixteen years afterward, his son was said to be twenty-five years old, which would mean that he married at ten years of age and had a son when he was eleven."[3] Although that was not impossible, it appears to be better to take the Septuagint (LXX) rendition of "twenty-five years" for the age of Ahaz when he began to reign.

"He made his son to pass through the fire" (2 Kings 16:3b). "This was not a symbolic rite."[4] Diodorous Siculus, as quoted by Hammond, describes such worship as it was practiced in Carthage, where there was a great temple in honor of Saturn (Molok), where there was the horribly ugly image of the god, a human form with a bull's head, having outstretched arms, where the children were laid and rolled downward into the bronze belly of the god. A furnace heated the whole image to a red-hot intensity; and as the screaming child was thrown into the god's arms, the noise was drowned out by flutes and kettle-drums.[5]

"This is the first instance of an actual Molech-sacrifice among the Israelites."[6] However, it was practiced quite frequently afterward as indicated by the denunciations of it by Ezekiel and Jeremiah. Ahab's horrible sacrifice here was doubtless made in that temple which Solomon had erected to Molech (1 Kings 11:7); "Thus we see the frightful flowering of the seed planted by Solomon."[7] Moses himself had warned God's people against such sacrifices, and all of God's prophets had vigorously denounced and condemned it. Ahaz's sacrifice of his son, "Was probably on some extraordinary occasion, like the sacrifice of his son by the king of the Moabites (2 Kings 3:27).[8]

Keil pointed out that, "In the closing year's of Ahaz's reign he actually closed the temple hall and suspended the temple worship (2 Chronicles 28:24)."[9]

Copyright Statement
Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on 2 Kings 16:1". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/2-kings-16.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

In the seventeenth year of Pekah the son of Remaliah Ahaz the son of Jotham king of Judah began to reign. Jotham began to reign in the second of Pekah, and he reigned sixteen years, and therefore his last year would fall in the eighteenth of Pekah; but as his first year might be at the beginning of the second of Pekah, his last was towards the end of the seventeenth of Pekah's, as here; see 2 Kings 15:32.

Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 16:1". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/2-kings-16.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

In the seventeenth year of Pekah the son of Remaliah a Ahaz the son of Jotham king of Judah began to reign.

(a) This was a wicked son of a godly father, as of him again came godly Hezekiah, and of him wicked Manasseh, save that God in the end showed him mercy. Thus we see how uncertain it is to depend on the dignity of our fathers.
Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on 2 Kings 16:1". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/2-kings-16.html. 1599-1645.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

CONTENTS

This chapter is wholly spent in recording the evil reign of Ahaz, king of Judah. The close of the chapter brings in a relief to the mind the introduction of his son Hezekiah, who succeeded him.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on 2 Kings 16:1". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/2-kings-16.html. 1828.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

2 Kings 16:1 In the seventeenth year of Pekah the son of Remaliah Ahaz the son of Jotham king of Judah began to reign.

Ver. 1. Ahaz the son of Jotham.] Under this most wicked prince prophesied Isaiah, Hosea, Micah, and Nahum, but with little good success, so incorrigibly flagitious were now all sorts grown.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 16:1". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/2-kings-16.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

2 KINGS CHAPTER 16

Ahaz’s idolatry, 2 Kings 16:1-4. Rezin king of Syria, and Pekah king of Israel, war against him: he hireth Tiglath-pileser against them, 2 Kings 16:5-9. Ahaz goeth to Damascus to meet the king of Assyria; seeth an altar; the pattern whereof he sends to Urijah, who maketh one like it at Jerusalem: Ahaz sacrificeth on it, 2 Kings 16:10-16. He spoileth the temple: Hezekiah succeedeth him, 2 Kings 16:17-20.

In the seventeenth year of Pekah; of which See Poole "2 Kings 15:30".

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 2 Kings 16:1". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/2-kings-16.html. 1685.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Ahaz. One of the four kings in whose reign Isaiah prophesied. Compare 2 Chronicles 28:1. Isaiah 1:1.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 2 Kings 16:1". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/2-kings-16.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

In the seventeenth year of Pekah the son of Remaliah Ahaz the son of Jotham king of Judah began to reign.

No JFB commentary on this verse.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Kings 16:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/2-kings-16.html. 1871-8.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

In the seventeenth year of Pekah the son of Remaliah Ahaz the son of Jotham king of Judah began to reign.
seventeenth
15:27-30,32,33
Ahaz
15:38; 2 Chronicles 28:1-4; Isaiah 1:1; 7:1; Hosea 1:1; Micah 1:1
Reciprocal: 2 Kings 15:30 - in the twentieth;  1 Chronicles 3:13 - Ahaz;  Matthew 1:9 - Achaz

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 2 Kings 16:1". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/2-kings-16.html.