Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

2 Kings 24:10

At that time the servants of Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon went up to Jerusalem, and the city came under siege.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Babylon;   Israel, Prophecies Concerning;   Jehoiachin;   Jerusalem;   Prophecy;   Siege;   Thompson Chain Reference - Israel;   Jerusalem;   Jews;   Sieges;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Babylon;   Jerusalem;   Kings;   Sieges;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Egypt;   Jehoiachin;   Nebuchadnezzar;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Babylon;   Jehoiachin;   Jeremiah;   Judah, tribe and kingdom;   Zedekiah;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Captivity;   Jerusalem;   Nebuchadnezzar;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Babylon, History and Religion of;   Exile;   Kings, 1 and 2;   Zerubbabel;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Israel;   Jeremiah;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Babylon ;   Jehoiachin ;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Jehoiachin;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Jeho-I'achin;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Captivity;   Jehoiachin;   Siege;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Metals;  

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Came up against Jerusalem - The cause and circumstances of this siege are equally obscure. Perhaps Nebuchadnezzar detected Jehoiachin in some attempt to open communications with Egypt.

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Bibliographical Information
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on 2 Kings 24:10". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/2-kings-24.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

THE FALL OF JERUSALEM AND THE FIRST DEPORTATION

"At that time the servants of Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon came up to Jerusalem, and the city was besieged. And Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon came unto the city, while his servants were besieging it; and Jehoiakin the king of Judah went out to the king of Babylon, he, and his mother, and his servants; and his princes, and his officers; and the king of Babylon took him in the eighth year of his reign. And he carried out thence all the treasures of the house of Jehovah, and the treasures of the king's house, and cut in pieces all the vessels of gold, which Solomon king of Israel had made in the temple of Jehovah, as Jehovah had said. And he carried away all Jerusalem, and all the princes, and all the mighty men of valor, even ten thousand captives, and all the craftsmen and the smiths; none remained, save the poorest sort of the people of the land. And he carried away Jehoiakin to Babylon; and the king's mother, and the king's wives,, and his officers, and the chief men of the land, carried he into captivity from Jerusalem to Babylon. And all the men of might, even seven thousand, and the craftsmen and the smiths a thousand, all of them strong and apt for war, even them the king of Babylon brought captive to Babylon. And the king of Babylon made Mattaniah, Jehoiakin's father's brother, king in his stead, and changed his name to Zedekiah."

These tragic words describe the fall of Jerusalem and the deportation of the cream of its population to Babylon. Daniel and his companions were among the princes carried away. These, in all probability, were emasculated and made eunuchs in the pagan establishment at Babylon. The Book of Daniel relates the fortunes of some of those princes. Significantly, God blessed Daniel with great preferment and power in Nebuchadnezzar's capital.

"In the eighth year of his reign" (2 Kings 24:12). "The eighth year of Nebuchadnezzar's reign was 597 B.C. The siege extended from December (Chislev) 598 B.C. to March (Adar) of 597 B.C., according to Babylonian records."[11]

"And Jehoiakin the king of Judah went out to the king of Babylon" (2 Kings 24:12). Evidently, Jehoiakin believed that by such submission to Nebuchadnezzar he might retain his throne as a vassal of Babylon. Of course, that is what took place earlier at the first conquest of Jerusalem, with the result that Jehoiakim retained his throne as a vassal, but on this occasion, "Nebuchadnezzar showed Jehoiakin no favor at all, treated him as a rebel, and carried him and all the nobility of Jerusalem into captivity in Babylon."[12]

A significant element in this chapter was the plundering and looting of Solomon's temple. "Nebuchadnezzar spoiled Solomon's temple three times: (1) He took some of the treasures away when Jehoiakim was king, placing the golden vessels in the temple of his god in Babylon (Daniel 1:2). These were the vessels profaned by Belshazzar (Daniel 5:2). (2) He continued the destruction by taking many other treasures, breaking and cutting them into pieces when he came up against Jeconiah (as in this chapter). (3) He thoroughly looted and destroyed the temple, even cutting up the brass and all other metal objects of value when the city fell a third time at the end of the reign of Zedekiah (2 Kings 25:13-16)."[13]

"And the king of Babylon made Mattaniah ... king in his stead, and changed his name to Zedekiah" (2 Kings 24:17). Zedekiah, of course, was another wicked son of Josiah; and Nebuchadnezzar's placing him on the throne of Judah should be understood as a full and complete submission of Zedekiah to the will of the king of Babylon. He had evidently sworn with a most solemn oath absolute and continual fealty to the king of Babylon, even invoking the name of Jehovah in that solemn oath. The change of his name to Zedekiah was an essential element in the whole procedure. The meaning of this was that Zedekiah's ultimate rebellion against Babylon was also interpreted by the prophet Jeremiah as rebellion against Jehovah.

This matter is discussed at length at Jeremiah 31.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on 2 Kings 24:10". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/2-kings-24.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

At that time,.... When Jehoiachin reigned:

when the year was expired; so it is in 2 Chronicles 36:10 or at the revolution of the year; which some take to be autumn, the beginning of the civil year with the Jews; but rather it was the spring, the time when kings went out to battle, 2 Samuel 11:1.

the servants of Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon came up against Jerusalem; that is, his army, under proper generals and officers, and by his orders:

and the city was besieged; in form by the Chaldean army.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 24:10". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/2-kings-24.html. 1999.

Keil & Delitzsch Old Testament Commentary

“At that time,” i.e., when Jehoiachin had come to the throne, or, according to 2 Chronicles 36:10, “at the turn of the year,” i.e., in the spring (see at 1 Kings 20:22), the servants (generals) of Nebuchadnezzar marched against Jerusalem, and the city was besieged. The Keri עלוּ is substantially correct, but is an unnecessary alteration of the Chethîb עלה, since the verb when it precedes the subject is not unfrequently used in the singular, though before a plural subject (cf. Ewald, §316, a.). The נב עבדי are different from the גדוּדים of 2 Kings 24:2. As the troops sent against Jehoiakim had not been able to conquer Judah, especially Jerusalem, Nebuchadnezzar sent his generals with an army against Jerusalem, to besiege the city and take it.

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The Keil & Delitzsch Old Testament Commentary is a derivative of a public domain electronic edition.
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Keil, Carl Friedrich & Delitzsch, Franz. "Commentary on 2 Kings 24:10". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/kdo/2-kings-24.html. 1854-1889.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

THE GOD-FORSAKEN CITY

‘The city was besieged.’

2 Kings 24:10

When wrong has been going on for some time it gathers a momentum, which gets beyond men’s power to control. It is like a carriage without a brake descending a steep hill. All is easy and pleasant at first, but as the descent continues the carriage gets beyond the driver’s control, and is dashed to pieces, and not only does the careless driver suffer, but those who are in the carriage suffer also, and some of them may even be killed.

I. King after king had done wrong in Judah, and as each king came to the throne he inherited the evil that his predecessors had done.—For a time the catastrophe was stayed by the long reigns of good men like Hezekiah and Josiah. But it had got beyond control, beyond the possibility of prevention. And as the new kings came—Jehoiakim, Jehoiachin, and Zedekiah—they seemed to grow more reckless the nearer the danger came, till at last the hand of God came down upon them and they and their country suffered the due reward of their deeds.

II. Yes, it was the hand of God. That is stated in a most striking way.—It is said that Zedekiah went on with his wickedness, and even rebelled against Nebuchadnezzar, because God was angry with him. We may think that God should have warned him and prevented him from doing so disastrous a thing as to rebel against the powerful King of Babylon. But God had warned till warning was no use. Nothing was of any use now except punishment. And so God must punish. If He did not punish He would not be the merciful God that He is. He punishes that the evil and all its misery may be stopped.

III. Zedekiah suffered terribly.—He first saw his sons killed before his eyes, and then his eyes were put out. After that he was loaded with chains and carried to Babylon. He suffered more, you may think, than his sins deserved. But he suffered for the sins of his friends as well as for his own. Just as we are benefited if we live with those who are good, so also we suffer if we live with those who are bad. We are bound together, and one who does wrong may not only suffer for it himself, but cause great suffering to others also. And one who does right will be blessed himself and a blessing to all who know him.

Illustrations

(1) ‘In the place of Jehoiachin, Nebuchadnezzar appointed Jehoiachin’s uncle Zedekiah as tributary king of Judah.

For the first few years of his reign Zedekiah was faithful to the Babylonian supremacy. Egypt, however, was, as usual, busily employed in trying to form a Palestinian alliance against Babylon. In the fifth year of his reign (593 b.c.), when the Babylonians were busily engaged in suppressing the Elamite insurgents in the east, Zedekiah suffered himself to be entangled in this conspiracy. Four years later (589 b.c), in the ninth year of Zedekiah’s reign, Nebuchadnezzar found himself free to deal with the Palestinian insurrection. Again the Babylonian army appeared in Syria. And now what Jeremiah had predicted so often was about to come to pass.’

(2) ‘Jeremiah wrote a book of sorrow over the distress. While food or money lasted, a few who had hoarded it away could have a little bread, or buy a drink of water or a little wood to cook the last meal. But the days came when people fainted for hunger, were parched with thirst; children cried for bread, but no one could give it; ladies who had worn robes of scarlet searched in heaps of filth for a mouthful of food. Sickness came with starvation; wounds with war; arrows tipped with fire came flying in the streets; noises like thunder were heard night and day, as great battering-engines pushed by companies of men shook the walls or hurled great stones which wounded and killed the brave soldiers within, who were doing their best to keep their enemies out.’

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Bibliographical Information
Nisbet, James. "Commentary on 2 Kings 24:10". Church Pulpit Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/2-kings-24.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

2 Kings 24:10 At that time the servants of Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon came up against Jerusalem, and the city was besieged.

Ver. 10. At that time.] About the spring. [2 Chronicles 36:10] Much about the same time was Cyrus born for a scourge to Babylon, (a) but for a relief to God’s poor prisoners of hope there; according as Isaiah had foretold, [Isaiah 47:1-2; Isaiah 13:16] and the psalmist. [Psalms 137:8-9] See Isaiah 44:28; Isaiah 45:1-4.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 24:10". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/2-kings-24.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Either,

1. Because the people had made Jehoiachin king without his consent. Or,

2. Because he had some notice, or at least a suspicion, of his intentions to rebel against him, and to join with Egypt against him, as Zedekiah his successor did. But whatsoever was the second and immediate cause of it, the chief cause was God’s commandment, or the direction of his providence, as it was said, 2 Kings 24:3.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 2 Kings 24:10". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/2-kings-24.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

10.Servants of Nebuchadnezzar — His generals, with forces sufficient to besiege the city. As the bands mentioned in 2 Kings 24:2 had failed to take Jerusalem, he now sends more imposing forces.

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 2 Kings 24:10". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/2-kings-24.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

2 Kings 24:10. The servants of Nebuchadnezzar came up against Jerusalem — Either, 1st, Because the people had made Jehoiachin king without his consent: or, 2d, Because he had some notice, or at least a suspicion, of his intentions to rebel and join with Egypt against him, as Zedekiah his successor did. But whatever was the second and immediate cause of it, the chief cause was God’s commandment, or the direction of his providence, as was said 2 Kings 24:3.

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on 2 Kings 24:10". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/2-kings-24.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Came. Hebrew, "servants....he came." But several manuscripts are more accurate and grammatical, "they came." (Kennicott) (Haydock)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on 2 Kings 24:10". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/2-kings-24.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

the servants Of. Some codices, with two early printed editions, Septuagint and Syriac, omit these words, and read "came up".

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 2 Kings 24:10". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/2-kings-24.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

At that time the servants of Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon came up against Jerusalem, and the city was besieged.

At that time - within three months after his accession to the throne; it was the spring of the year (2 Chronicles 36:10): so early did he indicate a feeling hostile to the interests of his Assyrian liege-lord, by forming a league with Egypt. Nebuchadnezzar sent his generals to besiege Jerusalem, as Jeremiah had foretold (Jer. 22:38; 24:30 ), and soon after followed in person. Convinced of the hopelessness of making any effectual resistance, Jehoiachin, going to the Camp of the besiegers, surrendered (2 Kings 24:12), in the expectation, probably, of being allowed to retain his throne as a vassal of the Assyrian empire. But Nebuchadnezzar's clemency toward the kings of Judah was now exhausted; so that Jehoiachin was sent as a captive to Babylon, according to Jeremiah's prediction (Jeremiah 22:24), accompanied by the queen-mother (the same who had held that dignity under Jehoahaz, 2 Kings 23:31), his generals, and officers. This happened in the eighth year of Nebuchaduezzar's reign, computing from the time when he was associated with his father in the government. Those that were left consisted chiefly of the poorer Sort of people and the unskilled workmen. The palace and the temple were ransacked. The smaller golden vessels had been taken on the first capture of Jerusalem, and placed by Nebuchadnezzar in the temple of his god, as tokens of victory, and used by Belshazzar at his impious feast, for the purpose of rewarding his army with these trophies, among which were, probably the golden candlesticks, ark etc. (cf. 2 Chronicles 36:7; Daniel 1:2). Now the gold plating was torn off all the larger temple furniture.

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Kings 24:10". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/2-kings-24.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(10) At that time.—In the spring of the year (2 Chronicles 36:10). Thenius infers from Jeremiah 13:19 (“the cities of the south land are shut up”), that Nebuchadnezzar drew a cordon across that part of the country, to cut off any succours from Egypt.

The servants—i.e., generals. (Comp. 2 Kings 19:6.)

Was besieged.—See margin; and 2 Kings 25:2; Jeremiah 52:5.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 24:10". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/2-kings-24.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

At that time the servants of Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon came up against Jerusalem, and the city was besieged.
At that time
Daniel 1:1,2
was besieged
Heb. came into siege.
25:2
Reciprocal: Deuteronomy 28:52 - General2 Kings 25:1 - Nebuchadnezzar;  2 Chronicles 36:10 - when the year was expired;  Ezra 5:12 - into the hand;  Jeremiah 6:3 - they shall;  Ezekiel 17:3 - came;  Ezekiel 17:12 - Behold;  Ezekiel 21:14 - let the;  Obadiah 1:11 - in the day that the

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Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 2 Kings 24:10". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/2-kings-24.html.