Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

2 Kings 5:25

But he went in and stood before his master. And Elisha said to him, "Where have you been, Gehazi?" And he said, "Your servant went nowhere."
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Covetousness;   Gehazi;   Joram;   Servant;   Worldliness;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Covetousness;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Gehazi;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Disease;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Covetousness;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Gehazi;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Elisha;   Gehazi;   Kings, 1 and 2;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Damascus;   Lie, Lying;   Naaman;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Gehazi ;   Naaman ;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Naaman;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Chief parables and miracles in the bible;   Elisha;   Gehazi;   Jehoahaz;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Eli'sha;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Kingdom of Israel;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Covetousness;   Elisha;   Gehazi;   Lie;   Naaman;  

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Lest his absence should be noticed, Gehazi hastened, without being called, to appear before his master. In the East it is usual for servants to remain most of the day in their lord‘s presence, only quitting it when given some order to execute.

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Bibliographical Information
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:25". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/2-kings-5.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

2 Kings 5:25

Thy servant went no whither.

A lie sticks

A little newsboy, to sell his paper, told a lie. The matter came up in the Sunday school. “Would you tell a lie for a penny?” asked a young lady teacher of one of her boys. “No ma’am,” he answered very decidedly. “For sixpence, then? No ma’am.” “For a shilling? “No, ma’am?” “For a thousand shillings?” Dick was staggered. A thousand shillings looked big. Wouldn’t it buy a lot of things? While he was thinking, another boy behind him called out, “No, ma’am.” “Why not?” asked the teacher. “Because,” said the boy, “when the thousand shillings are all gone, and all the things they’ve got with them have gone too, the lie is there, all the same.” It is so. A lie sticks. Everything else may be gone, but that is left, and it must be carried with you, whether you will or not.

Heredity not wholly a disadvantage

A young man complains to Jupiter that in consequence of his father’s debaucheries he is pierced with pangs and punished with pains for sins not his own. Jupiter replies that in accordance with the very law of which he complains, he also receives from his father delicate nerves, vigorous muscles, and keen senses which are inlets of joy and many noble capacities and faculties of mind and heart. Jupiter offers in his case to suspend the offensive organic law; but warns him that, in losing his pain, he shall also lose all advantages and benefits through that same law of hereditary descent. And he further reminds him that even his pain is a monitor to warn him from the paths of vice trodden by his father. The sufferer withdraws his complaint, resigns himself, and resolves by pious obedience to all bodily laws to bring back his body to a normal and healthy state. (Combe on the ”Constitution of Man. ”)

Continuity of evil influences

Suppose a company of shipowners started a sea captain with an imperfect chart and with an unseaworthy vessel, and after the vessel has been gone five days they feel sorry about it, and wish they had not let the vessel go out in that way. Does that make any difference to those who have gone out? No! In the first storm the captain and the crew go down. And if you come to God in the latter part of your life, when you have given your children an impulse in the wrong direction, those ten, or fifteen, or twenty years of example in the wrong direction will be mightier than the few words you can utter now in the right direction. So it is with the influence you have had anywhere in community. If you have all these years given countenance to those who are neglecting religion, can you correct that? (T. De Witt Talmage.)

Heredity may transmit predisposition to disease

We know from experience that a full measure of health is not often the happy condition of human tissues; we have, in short, a variety of circumstances which, as we say, predispose the individual to disease. One of the commonest forms of predisposition is that due to heredity. Probably it is true that what are known as hereditary diseases are due far more to a hereditary predisposition than to any transmission of the virus itself in any form. Antecedent disease predisposes the tissues to form a nidus for bacteria; conditions of environment or personal habits frequently act in the same way. Damp soils must be held responsible for many disasters to health, not directly, but indirectly, by predisposition; dusty trades and injurious occupations have a similar effect. Any one of these three different influences may in a variety of ways affect the tissues and increase their susceptibility to disease. Not infrequently we may get them combined. (Newman, “Bacteria.”)

Verse 27 The leprosy therefore of Naaman shall cleave unto thee, and unto thy seed for ever.--

Gehazi smitten with leprosy

The sin which led to this punishment suggests--

I. That it is a mark of the highest contempt of the Holy God to link His name with our sinful purposes. “As the Lord liveth,” said Gehazi, “I will take somewhat of him” (2 Kings 5:20). To stamp base metal with the image and name of the king is regarded as a great crime against the country and the monarch. How much greater the crime of stamping upon our evil actions the name of God. Yet some of the most diabolical acts that stain the page of history have been wrought in the name of the sinless Redeemer.

II. That the transgression of the first table of the moral law is a step to the transgression of the second. The man who will speak lightly of a good master will find it an easy matter to misrepresent the character of his fellow-servant. The child who dishonours a good parent will not be likely to be a kind brother. Those who “fear not God,” will as a rule “regard not men” (Luke 18:2). The sin against the less, comes easily after the sin against the greater. Gehazi first profaned the name of God, and then wronged his earthly master.

III. That those who will lie in order to deceive, must lie in order to conceal. Gehazi’s lie to Naaman was soon followed by another to Elisha. It has been said that “a lie has no legs.” There are men in the world who have no limbs upon which they can walk, and are indebted to the artificial help of crutches to make their way in the world. So a lie must be kept up by the crutches of other lies. The punishment for the sin teaches--That those who sin and seek to cover it by concealment, will be compelled, in time, to be the means of its revelation. (Outlines of Sermons by a London Minister.)
.

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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "2 Kings 5:25". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/2-kings-5.html. 1905-1909. New York.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

But he went in, and stood before his master,.... To know his will, and minister to him, as he had used to do, and as if he had never been from the house:

and Elisha said unto him, whence comest thou, Gehazi? where had he been, and where was he last?

and he said, thy servant went no whither; he pretended he had never been out of doors, which was another impudent lie; one would have thought that he who had lived so long with the prophet, and had seen the miracles wrought by him, and knew with what a spirit of prophecy he was endowed, would never have ventured to tell such an untruth, since he might expect to be detected; but covetousness had blinded his eyes and hardened his heart.

Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:25". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/2-kings-5.html. 1999.

Scofield's Reference Notes

no whither

Heb. "not hither or thither."

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These files are considered public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available in the Online Bible Software Library.
Bibliographical Information
Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on 2 Kings 5:25". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/2-kings-5.html. 1917.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

2 Kings 5:25 But he went in, and stood before his master. And Elisha said unto him, Whence [comest thou], Gehazi? And he said, Thy servant went no whither.

Ver. 25. Thy servant went no whither.] Another flat lie; sic mendaciuui mendacio assuit; but with ill success. Our false hearts will answer us in like sort, when they have been ranging and roving in hell’s ways.

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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:25". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/2-kings-5.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

2 Kings 5:25

There was a stern justice in the penalty which followed on Gehazi's lie. Naaman's leprosy should go along with his wealth. In grasping at the one, Gehazi had succeeded in inheriting the other. The justice of the punishment will be more apparent if we consider what it was in Gehazi's conduct that led up to his lie, and which, from his point of view, made it at the moment necessary for him to tell the lie. Gehazi's conduct involved:—I. A violation of the trust which his master had reposed in him. Confidence is to society what cement is to a building; it holds all together. Gehazi was not merely Elisha's servant; he was also, to a great extent, a trusted companion; in a certain sense he was his partner. To use the great position which his relation to Elisha had secured to him for a purpose which he knew Elisha would disapprove was an act which even the pagans of Damascus in their better moments would have shrunk from doing.

II. Gehazi's act was so wrong in the eyes of Elisha because it involved a serious injury to the cause of true religion. Elisha had been careful to refuse the presents which Naaman offered because he did not wish the blessings which Naaman had received to be associated in his mind with the petty details- of a commercial transaction. Gehazi's act, as it must have presented itself to Naaman, had all the appearance of an afterthought on the part of the prophet, which would be fatal to his first and high idea of the prophet's disinterestedness.

III. Notice the blindness of sin, blindness in the midst of so much ingenuity, so much contrivance. No one knew better than Gehazi that Elisha knew a great deal that was going on beyond the range of his eyesight. Sin blinds men to the real circumstances with which they have to deal.

IV. Gehazi's fall teaches us three practical lessons: (1) to keep our desires in order if we mean to keep out of grave sin; (2) to remember that great religious advantages do not in themselves protect a man against grievous sins; (3) the priceless value of truthfulness in the soul's life.

H. P. Liddon, Penny Pulpit, No. 1122.

References: 2 Kings 5:25.—E. Thring, Uppingham Sermons, vol. ii., p. 228; G. Brooks, Outlines of Sermons, p. 419. 2 Kings 5:25-27.—G. B. Ryley, Christian World Pulpit, vol. v., p. 365. 2 Kings 5:26.—R. Heber, Parish Sermons, vol. ii., p. 136. 2 Kings 5:27.—J. Baines, Sermons, p. 186. 2Ki 5—Clergyman's Magazine, vol. i., pp. 78, 79; A. Macleod, The Gentle Heart, p. 131; A. Saphir, Found by the Good Shepherd, p. 351; H. Macmillan, Sunday Magazine, 1873, p. 417. 2 Kings 6:1.—Parker, Christian World Pulpit, vol. xxix., p. 274.



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Bibliographical Information
Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:25". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/2-kings-5.html.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

But he went in, and stood before his master. And Elisha said unto him, Whence comest thou, Gehazi? And he said, Thy servant went no whither.

No JFB commentary on this verse.

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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:25". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/2-kings-5.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(25) But he.—And he himself (after putting away his ill-gotten gains).

Went in.—Into his master’s chamber. Gehazi was already in the house.

Stood before.—Came forward to (2 Chronicles 6:12).

Thy servant went no whither.—Literally, Thy servant went not away hither nor thither.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:25". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/2-kings-5.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

But he went in, and stood before his master. And Elisha said unto him, Whence comest thou, Gehazi? And he said, Thy servant went no whither.
stood before
Proverbs 30:20; Ezekiel 33:31; Matthew 26:15,16,21-15; John 13:2,26-30
Whence
20:14; Genesis 3:8,9; 4:9; 16:8
Thy servant
22; Acts 5:3,4
no whither
Heb. not hither or thither.
Reciprocal: Joshua 1:1 - Moses' minister;  Joshua 7:11 - dissembled;  Joshua 7:21 - they are hid;  1 Samuel 10:14 - no where;  1 Samuel 13:11 - What hast;  2 Samuel 1:3 - From;  2 Kings 8:14 - He told me;  Job 1:7 - Whence;  Proverbs 27:18 - so;  Matthew 26:25 - Judas

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
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Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 2 Kings 5:25". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/2-kings-5.html.