Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

2 Kings 9:13

Then they hurried and each man took his garment and placed it under him on the bare steps, and blew the trumpet, saying, "Jehu is king!"
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Church and State;   Decision;   Enthusiasm;   Jehu;   King;   Trumpet;   Usurpation;   Thompson Chain Reference - Instruments, Chosen;   Music;   Musical Instruments;   Trumpets;   Worship;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Kings;   Trumpet;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Jezebel;   Ramoth;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Phoenicia;   Ramoth-gilead;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Jehu;   Jezebel;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Dress;   House;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Elisha;   Kings, 1 and 2;   Music, Instruments, Dancing;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Government;   Jehu;   Prophecy, Prophets;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Entry into Jerusalem;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Jehu ;   Jezebel ;   Jezreel ;   Ramoth Gilead ;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Jehu;   Ramothgilead;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Anoint;   Jehu;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Kingdom of Israel;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Took every man his garment - This was a ceremony by which they acknowledged him as king; and it was by such a ceremony that the multitudes acknowledged Jesus Christ for the Messiah and King of Israel, a little before his passion: see Matthew 21:7; (note), and the note there. The ceremony was expressive: "As we put our garments under his feet, so we place every thing under his authority, and acknowledge ourselves his servants."

On the top of the stairs - The Chaldee, the rabbins, and several interpreters, understand this of the public sun-dial; which in those ancient times, was formed of steps like stairs, each step serving to indicate, by its shadow, one hour, or such division of time as was commonly used in that country. This dial was, no doubt, in the most public place; and upon the top of it, or on the platform on the top, would be a very proper place to set Jehu, while they blew their trumpets, and proclaimed him king. The Hebrew מעלות maaloth is the same word which is used 2 Kings 20:9-11, to signify the dial of Ahaz; and this was probably the very same dial on which that miracle was afterwards wrought: and this dial, מעלות maaloth, from עלה alah, to go up, ascend, was most evidently made of steps; the shadows projected on which, by a gnomon, at the different elevations of the sun, would serve to show the popular divisions of time. See the notes on 2 Kings 20:9; (note), etc.

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Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on 2 Kings 9:13". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/2-kings-9.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Took every man his garment, and put it under him - The outer cloak of the Jews was a sort of large shawl or blanket, which might well serve for a carpet of state. Such a carpet is commonly represented on the seat of an Assyrian throne in the Nineveh sculptures.

The stairs rose against the walI of the house from the pavement of the court to the level of the upper story, or of the roof. At the top of the stairs would be a flat platform, and this would form a throne, on which the new king could exhibit himself to his subjects.

Blew with trumpets - On this recognized part of the ceremony of a coronation, see 2 Kings 11:14; 2 Samuel 15:10; 1 Kings 1:39.

sa40

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on 2 Kings 9:13". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/2-kings-9.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Then they hasted, and took every man his garment, and put it under him on the top of the stairs,.... That is, under Jehu, that he might be raised higher, and put on an eminence above them, agreeably to the high rank and dignity he was raised unto, and which they hereby acknowledged; and that he might be conspicuous to others: and this was done upon the top of the stairs, the first and highest of them, which led up either to an upper room, or to a scaffold erected for this purpose; the Targum is, on the degree of hours, a sun dial, a stone on which were engraven the twelve hours of the day, and which, by the sun's shadow on it, it might be known what hour it was; and at, or upon this stone, they laid their clothes, for Jehu to sit upon; not their wearing apparel, but carpets, or pieces of tapestry, or such like things:

and blew with trumpets, saying, Jehu is king; and they might come the more easily into such an acknowledgment of him as such, though he was anointed by one whom they had just called a mad fellow; being not so well affected to Ahab's family, and having a great respect for Jehu, the chief commander of the army, and especially being under a particular influence of the divine Providence, which moved them to take such a step.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 9:13". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/2-kings-9.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

they hasted, and took every man his garment — the upper cloak which they spread on the ground, as a token of their homage to their distinguished commander (Matthew 21:7).

top of the stairs — from the room where the prophet had privately anointed Jehu. That general returned to join his brother officers in the public apartment, who, immediately on learning his destined elevation, conducted him to the top of the stairs leading to the roof. This was the most conspicuous place of an Oriental structure that could be chosen, being at the very top of the gate building, and fully in view of the people and military in the open ground in front of the building [Kitto]. The popularity of Jehu with the army thus favored the designs of Providence in procuring his immediate and enthusiastic proclamation as king, and the top of the stairs was taken as a most convenient substitute for a throne.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Kings 9:13". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/2-kings-9.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Then they hasted, and took every man his garment, and put it under him on the top of the stairs, and blew with trumpets, saying, Jehu is king.

They hasted — God putting it into their hearts thus readily to own him.

Under him — Under Jehu. A ceremony used in the eastern parts towards superiors, in token of reverence to his person, that they would not have his feet to touch the ground, and that they put themselves and their concerns under his feet, and into his disposal.

The stairs — In some high and eminent place, whence he might be seen and owned by all the soldiers, who were called together upon this great occasion.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 9:13". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/2-kings-9.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

2 Kings 9:13 Then they hasted, and took every man his garment, and put [it] under him on the top of the stairs, and blew with trumpets, saying, Jehu is king.

Ver. 13. Then they hasted.] See on 2 Kings 9:11.

And took every man his garment, and put it under him.] That is, under Jehu, in token of subjection, and for a ceremony of honour which they used to their new kings, as Matthew 21:7-8. The Romans had a like custom, as Plutarch writeth; and the Grecians, as Athenaeus.

On the top of the stairs.] i.e., In suggesto regio, (a) in some high place, which they made use of for a throne.

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Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 9:13". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/2-kings-9.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Then they hasted; being well-pleased with the thing; partly, from the advantage which hereby they expected; partly, from that desire of change which is in most men’s natures; and principally, by God’s providence inclining their hearts to Jehu.

Took every man his garment, and put it under him; a ceremony used in the eastern parts towards superiors, in token of great reverence to his person, that they would not have his feet to touch the ground, and that they put themselves and their concerns under his feet, and into his disposal. See Poole "Matthew 21:7".

On the top of the stairs; in some high and eminent place, whence he might be seen and owned by all the soldiers, who were called together upon this great occasion.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 2 Kings 9:13". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/2-kings-9.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

13.Took every man his garment — This spreading of garments down for sovereigns to tread upon was and is a common custom in the East.

Compare Matthew 21:7. It was a public expression of subjection and homage.

On the top of the stairs — Literally, On the bone of the steps, that is, on the very steps, or stairway, leading up to the house wherein these warriors were assembled. In their haste to proclaim Jehu king, they did not stop to go and erect a suitable platform and a throne, but used for this purpose the very steps of the house where they were sitting. “The stairs doubtless ran round the inside of the quadrangle of the house, as they do now, for instance, in the ruin called the house of Zaccheus at Jericho, and Jehu sat where they joined the flat platform which formed the top or roof of the house. Thus he was conspicuous against the sky, while the captains were below him in the quadrangle.” — Stanley.

Blew with trumpets — A common custom when a new king was proclaimed. Compare 1 Kings 1:39-40.

Jehu is king — “Their readiness in throwing off their allegiance to Jehoram is something remarkable. But it was known that the house of Ahab was in this generation doomed to destruction. This was a thing people were not likely to forget. It was known that Elisha, who had sent this man, was a commissioned prophet, authorized to declare the will of the Lord. And it is probable that the military were dissatisfied with the rule of a house so completely under the influence of one bad woman, and the errors and crimes of which had, first and last, brought so much discredit upon the nation. Add to this, that in the absence of a fixed succession to a throne which so many successful adventurers had already won, loyalty sits but lightly upon the soldiery; and they are very prone to vote a popular commander into the throne when it becomes vacant, or even to make it vacant for him.” — Kitto.

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 2 Kings 9:13". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/2-kings-9.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

2 Kings 9:13. Then they hasted — Being well pleased with the thing; partly from the advantage which hereby they expected; partly from that desire of change which is in the nature of most men; and principally by God’s providence inclining their hearts to Jehu. And took every man his garment, and put it under him — In token of great reverence for his person, that they would not have his feet to touch the ground, and that they put themselves and their concerns under his feet and into his disposal. It was a ceremony used in the eastern countries toward superiors: see Matthew 21:7. On the top of the stairs — In some high and eminent place, whence he might be seen and owned by all the soldiers, who were called together on this great occasion. Saying, Jehu is king — They proclaimed him by sound of trumpet to be appointed by God to the kingdom of Israel.

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on 2 Kings 9:13". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/2-kings-9.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Garment, out of respect, as the multitude honoured Jesus Christ, Matthew xxi. 7. The pagans sometimes did the like when they carried their idols in procession. (Plutarch, in Alcib.) The king of Persia walked on carpets in the court of the guards, who were styled immortal. (Atheneus 12.) --- Trumpet, according to custom, 3 Kings i. 40. (Calmet)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on 2 Kings 9:13". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/2-kings-9.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

stairs = steps. Acts 21:30, Acts 21:40.

is king = reigneth.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 2 Kings 9:13". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/2-kings-9.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Then they hasted, and took every man his garment, and put it under him on the top of the stairs, and blew with trumpets, saying, Jehu is king.

Hasted, and took every man his garment. The upper cloak, which they spread on the ground as a token of their homage to their distinguished commander (Matthew 21:7).

Top of the stairs - from the room where the prophet had privately anointed Jehu. That general returned to join his brother officers in the public apartment, who, immediately on learning his destined elevation, conducted him to the top of the stairs leading to the roof, and which was the most conspicuous place of an Oriental structure that could be chosen, being at the very top of the gate-building, and fully in view of the people and military in the open ground in front of the building (Kitto). The popularity of Jehu with the army thus favoured the designs of Providence in procuring his immediate and enthusiastic proclamation as king; and the top of the stairs was taken as a most convenient substitute for a throne.

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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Kings 9:13". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/2-kings-9.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(13) Then (and) they hasted.—LXX., “and they heard, and hasted.” This is probably original, the sense being that the moment they heard it, they hastily took up their outer garments, and laid them as a carpet for Jehu to walk upon. (Comp. Luke 19:36.) The instantaneous action of the generals shows that there must have existed a strong feeling against Joram in the army and an enthusiasm for Jehu which only required a word from him to precipitate a revolution.

Put it under him on the top of the stairs.—So Kimchi, “at the uppermost step.” The words are much discussed by commentators. The LXX. has, “and put it underneath him on the garem of the steps” (retaining the Hebrew word gèrem); the Syriac, “and put it under him on a seat of steps;” the Targum, “at the steps of the hours,” i.e., a flight of steps which served as a sundial (comp. 2 Kings 20:11); the Vulg., “and each one, taking his cloak, put it under his feet in similitudinem tribunalis,” i.e., in the fashion of a rostrum, or elevated platform; the Arabic, “on the steps of the rise” (or “elevation”).

The word gèrem, rendered “top,” can hardly have that meaning. In Hebrew it rarely occurs (Proverbs 17:22; Proverbs 25:15), and means bone, for which in Aramaic it is the usual term (Daniel 6:25). In Arabic the word means “body,” and it is usually so explained in one passage of the Bible (Genesis 49:14), “Issachar is a strong ass;” literally, an ass of body. As the Aramaic garmâ is used in the sense of “self,” some would render the present phrase, “on the stairs themselves.” But perhaps we may better translate on the analogy of the Arabic word, “They put (their cloaks) under him, on to (‘el) the body of the stairs.” The stairway on the outside of the house, leading to the roof, served as an extemporised throne, or rather platform, for the king. (Comp. 2 Kings 11:14.) Some Hebrew MSS. have “upon” for “on to.” (Comp. 2 Samuel 21:10, “on the rock.”)

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 9:13". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/2-kings-9.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Then they hasted, and took every man his garment, and put it under him on the top of the stairs, and blew with trumpets, saying, Jehu is king.
and took every
The spreading of garments in the street, before persons to whom it was intended to shew particular honour, was an ancient and very general custom; the garments in these cases being used for carpets. In the Agamemnon of Æschylus, the hypocritical Clytemnestra commands the maids to spread carpets before her returning husband, that on his descending from his chariot he may place his foot on "a purple-covered path." We also find this custom among the Romans. Plutarch relates, that when Cato of Utica left the Macedonian army, where he had become legionary tribune, the soldiers spread their clothes in the way.
Matthew 21:7,8; Mark 11:7,8
on the top
The ancient fortified cities were generally strengthened with a citadel, (Jud 9:46, 51,) commonly built on an eminence, to which they ascended by a flight of stairs, (Ne 3:15.) It is extremely probable, therefore, that Ramoth-gilead, being a frontier town of Israel and Syria, had a tower of this nature; and that Jehu was proclaimed king on the top of the stairs by which they ascended the hill on which the tower stood, i.e., in the area before the door of the tower, and consequently the most public place in the city.
blew with trumpets
2 Samuel 15:10; 1 Kings 1:34,39; Psalms 47:5-7; 98:6
is king
Heb. reigneth.
Reciprocal: Judges 3:27 - he blew;  2 Chronicles 23:13 - sounded;  Luke 19:35 - they cast;  Acts 21:40 - on

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Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 2 Kings 9:13". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/2-kings-9.html.