Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

2 Kings 9:18

So a horseman went to meet him and said, "Thus says the king, ‘Is it peace?'" And Jehu said, "What have you to do with peace? Turn behind me." And the watchman reported, "The messenger came to them, but he did not return."
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Ahaziah;   Church and State;   Conspiracy;   Decision;   Jehu;   Jezreel;   Joram;   Usurpation;   Thompson Chain Reference - Watchmen;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Horse, the;   Kings;   Watchmen;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Jezebel;   Jezreel;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Ahaziah;   Jehoram;   Jehu;   Jezreel;   Phoenicia;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Jezebel;   Jezreel;   Messenger;   Watches;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Transportation and Travel;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Government;   Jehu;   Prophecy, Prophets;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Ahaziah ;   Jehu ;   Jezebel ;   Jezreel ;   Joram, Jehoram;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Jehu;   Ramothgilead;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Jehu;   War;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Jehoram;   Watchman;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

What hast thou to do with peace? - "What is it to thee whether there be peace or war? Join my company, and fall into the rear."

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on 2 Kings 9:18". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/2-kings-9.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

What hast thou to do with peace? - i. e., “What does it matter to thee whether my errand is one of peace or not?”

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on 2 Kings 9:18". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/2-kings-9.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

So there went one on horseback to meet him, and said, thus saith the king, is it peace?.... Are things well in the army, or any disturbance in the kingdom? are you come as friends or enemies?

and Jehu said, what hast thou to do with peace? or to ask such a question:

turn thee behind me; which he was obliged to do, Jehu having such a company of soldiers with him; and this he did, that he might carry no tidings to Joram, that he might not know as yet who he and his company were:

and the watchman told, saying, the messenger came to them, but he cometh not again; of this he sent word to the king what he had observed.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 9:18". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/2-kings-9.html. 1999.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

PEACE, OR A SWORD?

‘And Jehu said, What hast thou to do with peace? turn thee behind me.’

2 Kings 9:18

I. The dispensation of judgment and the dispensation of love, so opposite in all points, did, in fact, proceed from one and the same Divine will.—The sword of Jehu and the healing voice of Christ had, in fact, this common origin; they were both part of the Divine economy for the conquest over evil. One of them flashed forth in vengeance and retribution; the other breathed love even to the most unworthy. But both were alike in this point Divine, that they marked the enormity of sin in the sight of God, albeit the one consumed the sinner and his house, and the other lifted up the sinner and let him go free, because One Who had done no sin was ready to suffer in his stead.

II. The new law of the Gospel, so full of love, so profound, so ennobling in its observance, may begin at once to do its work in the heart as soon as its Divine prescriptions are understood.—But when we look round and find a world full of resistance to that law, we understand that the very fact that it is resisted limits us in our adoption of it as a rule. When the invader, in his cruel selfishness, breaks through the silken cords of the Gospel, and seems to know no law but that of selfishness, it seems that stern language would alone be understood. ‘What hast thou to do with peace? turn thee behind me.”

III. War is a remnant of the old and harsher covenant, which must endure into the covenant of love, simply because of the evil tempers of mankind that are still unsubdued, and because the law of Christ cannot have its perfect operation except where it is leavening the whole mass. We are soldiers of Christ, and His war is ever being carried on. He will fight for us; He will ever find us service.

—Archbishop Thomson.

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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Nisbet, James. "Commentary on 2 Kings 9:18". Church Pulpit Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/2-kings-9.html. 1876.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

2 Kings 9:18 So there went one on horseback to meet him, and said, Thus saith the king, [Is it] peace? And Jehu said, What hast thou to do with peace? turn thee behind me. And the watchman told, saying, The messenger came to them, but he cometh not again.

Ver. 18. Is it peace?] See 2 Kings 9:17.

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Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 9:18". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/2-kings-9.html. 1865-1868.

Sermon Bible Commentary

2 Kings 9:18

I. The dispensation of judgment and the dispensation of love, so opposite in all points, did, in fact, proceed from one and the same Divine will. The sword of Jehu and the healing voice of Christ had, in fact, this common origin; they were both part of the Divine economy for the conquest over evil. One of them flashed forth in vengeance and retribution; the other breathed love even to the most unworthy. But both were alike in this point Divine, that they marked the enormity of sin in the sight of God, albeit the one consumed the sinner and his house, and the other lifted up the sinner and let him go free, because One who had done no sin was ready to suffer in his stead.

II. The new law of the Gospel, so full of love, so profound, so ennobling in its observance, may begin at once to do its work in the heart as soon as its Divine prescriptions are understood. But when we look round and find a world full of resistance to that law, we understand that the very fact that it is resisted limits us in our adoption of it as a rule. When the invader, in his cruel selfishness, breaks through the silken cords of the Gospel, and seems to know no law but that of selfishness, it seems that stern language would alone be understood. "What hast thou to do with peace? turn thee behind me."

III. War is a remnant of the old and harsher covenant, which must endure into the covenant of love, simply because of the evil tempers of mankind that are still unsubdued, and because the law of Christ cannot have its perfect operation except where it is leavening the whole mass. We are soldiers of Christ, and His war is ever being carried on. He will fight for us; He will ever find us service.

Archbishop Thomson, Life in the Light of God's Word, p. 71.


References: 2 Kings 9:18.—J. M. Neale, Sermons in Sackville College, vol. ii., pp. 145, 155. 2 Kings 9:20.—G. Brooks, Outlines of Sermons, p. 267. 2 Kings 9:36.—J. W. Burgon, Ninety-one Short Sermons, No. 73. 2 Kings 9:37.—E. Monro, Practical Sermons on the Old Testament, vol. ii., p. 173. 2Ki 9—Parker, vol. viii., p. 203. 2 Kings 10:10.—R. Heber, Parish Sermons, vol. ii., p. 148.



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Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on 2 Kings 9:18". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/2-kings-9.html.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

What hast thou to do with peace? what right hast thou, or thy master that sent thee, to peace?

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 2 Kings 9:18". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/2-kings-9.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

18.What hast thou to do with peace — The supercilious language of a conqueror who is perfect master of the situation, and can dictate the course to be pursued.

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 2 Kings 9:18". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/2-kings-9.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Peace? As this expression sufficiently vindicated the designs of Jehu, he would not suffer the messenger to return before him. (Haydock)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on 2 Kings 9:18". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/2-kings-9.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

What . . . ? Figure of speech Anteisagoge (App-6).

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 2 Kings 9:18". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/2-kings-9.html. 1909-1922.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(18) One on horseback.—Literally, the rider of the horse.

What hast thou to do with peace?—A rough evasion: “What business is it of yours, on what ground I am come?” Conscious of his strength, Jehu can despise the royal message, and the messenger durst not disobey the fierce general, when ordered summarily to the rear. Of course Jehu wished to prevent an alarm being raised in Jezreel.

Came to them.—Literally, came right up to them. (The Hebrew text should be corrected from 2 Kings 9:20.)

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Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 9:18". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/2-kings-9.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

So there went one on horseback to meet him, and said, Thus saith the king, Is it peace? And Jehu said, What hast thou to do with peace? turn thee behind me. And the watchman told, saying, The messenger came to them, but he cometh not again.
What hast thou to do
19,22; Isaiah 48:22; 59:8; Jeremiah 16:5; Romans 3:17
Reciprocal: 1 Kings 2:13 - Comest;  2 Kings 9:31 - peace

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Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 2 Kings 9:18". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/2-kings-9.html.