Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

2 Kings 9:31

As Jehu entered the gate, she said, "Is it well, Zimri, your master's murderer?"
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Decision;   Elijah;   Homicide;   Jehu;   Jezebel;   Jezreel;   Naboth;   Servant;   Usurpation;   Wife;   Women;   Zimri;   Thompson Chain Reference - Elijah;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Jezebel;   Jezreel;   Zimri;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Jehu;   Jezebel;   Jezreel;   Phoenicia;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Kings, First and Second, Theology of;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Jezebel;   Jezreel;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Ahab;   Architecture in the Biblical Period;   Elijah;   Jezebel;   Zimri;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Government;   Jehu;   Jezebel;   Prophecy, Prophets;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Hosea ;   Jezebel ;   Jezreel ;   Zimri ;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Jehu;   Ramothgilead;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Jez'ebel;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Jehu;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Jehu;   Jezebel;   Jezreel;   Zimri (2);  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Had Zimri peace, who slew his master? - Jarchi paraphrases this place thus: "If thou hast slain thy master, it is no new thing; for Zimri also slew Elah, the son of Baasha;" which words were rather intended to conciliate than to provoke. But the words are understood by most of the versions thus: Health to Zimri, the slayer of his master!

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on 2 Kings 9:31". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/2-kings-9.html. 1832.

The Biblical Illustrator

2 Kings 9:31

Had Zimri peace, who slew his master?

Divine purposes and human agencies

These are not the words of the Spirit of God, but of that wicked witch Jezebel, wife of the idolatrous Ahab. Nevertheless, there is a truth implied in them which it shall be our present business to expound and illustrate. “Had Zimri peace, who slew his master?” What did she mean by this? The answer is in the story of Zimri told in the sixteenth chapter of the first Book of Kings. Elah, son of Baasha, has reigned over Israel but two years, when in a drunken revel, in the house of his steward, he is slain by Zimri, captain of half his chariots, and his throne usurped by the traitor who had thus shed his blood. But for Zimri there is indeed no peace; the seven days of his reign are days of terror and of blood. Tirzah is speedily besieged by the army under Omri which hastens from Gibbethon; and when Zimri sees that his usurped power is gone, he betakes himself to the palace, where, kindling a fire around him, he perishes in the midst of the flames. That Divine purposes are sometimes accomplished by wicked agents; but that this in nowise excuses the agents themselves, or shields them from merited punishment.

I. By many facts in human history.

1. Look at facts in the history of nations.

2. Look at facts in the history of individuals.

There is Jacob concerning whose relation to Esau the prophecy stands that “the elder shall serve the younger”; yet how utterly detestable the means;--the lies, the trickery, the fraud, by which the end is attained, for the purposes of God I have respect, and I know that they shall stand, but for the means used by Jacob and his mother, I have the utmost abhorrence and contempt.

II. In the great central fact of Christianity. I mean the Crucifixion of the Lord. Here, the divinest purpose works itself out by the most satanic agency. The noblest deed of love ever wrought by the great God of love Himself, combines with the meanest, foulest, deed of hatred, ever wrought by man, in the great agony of the Cross. “Him,” says Peter, “being delivered by the determinate counsel and foreknowledge of God, ye by wicked hands have crucified and slain.” And yet one step further--“I wot that through ignorance ye did it.” So that here the chosen channels through which Divine wisdom and Divine love pour themselves upon us are human ignorance and wickedness! “O the depth of the riches,” etc. And here, I merely remark, that to the sentence,which states the principle we are discussing, I might add another member:--namely, That if those wicked agents who, consciously or unconsciously carry out Divine purposes, repent of their sin, they are not excluded from participation in the good they have been instrumentally, and sinfully, accomplishing.

III. In the dissemination of the gospel. Means in themselves inconsistent with the spirit of the Gospel, are in the order of Divine providence, indirectly employed. (J. W. Lance.)

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Bibliographical Information
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "2 Kings 9:31". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/2-kings-9.html. 1905-1909. New York.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And as Jehu entered in at the gate,.... Either of the city of Jezreel, or of the king's palace:

she said, had Zimri peace, who slew his master? Elah the son of Baasha king of Israel; no, he had not; he reigned but seven days, and, being besieged, burnt the king's house over him, and died, 1 Kings 16:10, suggesting that the like would be his fate, who had slain his master Joram; or the words may be rendered, "O Zimri, the slayer of his master"; calling Jehu so, because of his likeness to Zimri.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 9:31". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/2-kings-9.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

And as Jehu entered in at the gate, she said, [Had] m Zimri peace, who slew his master?

(m) As if to say, "Can a traitor or anyone who rises against his superior succeed?", see (1 Kings 16:10).
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on 2 Kings 9:31". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/2-kings-9.html. 1599-1645.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And as Jehu entered in at the gate, she said, Had Zimri peace, who slew his master?

Had Zimri — Remember thy brother traitor Zimri had but a very short enjoyment of the benefit of his treason.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 9:31". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/2-kings-9.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

2 Kings 9:31 And as Jehu entered in at the gate, she said, [Had] Zimri peace, who slew his master?

Ver. 31. She said, Had Zimri peace?] Or, O Zimri - so she calleth Jehu, his master’s murderer, - shall it be peace? thinkest thou to carry it away clear thus? She thought, haply, that being a woman she might say anything, Hecuba-like; and that Jehu would not meddle with her: but he had a particular charge about her, [2 Kings 9:7; 2 Kings 9:10] and his case was not Zimri’s, who came quickly to an ill end indeed; as did also Phocas, who had stewed his master Mauricius in his own broth, and was himself killed piecemeal.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 9:31". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/2-kings-9.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

At the gate of the king’s palace.

Had Zimri peace, who slew his master? remember that thy brother traitor Zimri had but a very short enjoyment of the benefit of his treason, and was speedily and severely punished for it by my grandfather, Omri, 1 Kings 16:9,16, and do thou expect the same from some of my posterity.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 2 Kings 9:31". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/2-kings-9.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

31.Jehu entered in at the gate — Or rather, as the context shows, came up to the gate; that is, the gate of the palace leading into the enclosed court of the palace beyond. This gate seems to have been the royal entrance into the city of Jezreel, so that the palace was at this point built against the outer wall of the city, and to the window over the gate Jezebel had come, in order to look and speak defiance to the approaching destroyer.

Had Zimri peace, who slew his master — This is her last glory, to remind her enemy of the fate of one who had, like him, usurped the royal power, and killed his king, and, as Kitto says, “to cast one bitter, burning word upon the head of the destroyer, such as should haunt and scorch him all his life.”

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 2 Kings 9:31". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/2-kings-9.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

2 Kings 9:31. Had Zimri peace, who slew his master? — Remember that thy brother traitor, Zimri, had but a very short enjoyment of the benefit of his treason, and was speedily and severely punished for it by my grand-father Omri, (see the margin,) and expect thou the same treatment from some of my posterity. She took no notice of the hand of God gone out against her family, but flew in the face of him who was only a sword in that hand. Thus men are very apt, when they are in trouble, to break out into passion against the instruments of their trouble, when they ought to be submissive to God, and angry at themselves only. The cases of Zimri and Jehu were not at all parallel. Zimri, who had come to the throne by blood and treachery, and who, within seven days, was constrained to burn the palace over his head, and himself in it, had no warrant for assuming the government, but was incited to do it purely by his own ambition and cruelty; whereas Jehu was anointed to be king at the express command of God, given to Elijah, (1 Kings 19:16,) and in all he did against the house of Ahab, acted by divine direction. In comparing persons and things, we must carefully distinguish between the precious and the vile; and take heed, lest in the fate of sinful men we read the doom of useful men.

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on 2 Kings 9:31". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/2-kings-9.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Master. Being convinced that she could not gain the affections of Jehu, (Haydock) and thinking that he would not lay hands on a woman, (Menochius) she insolently, or in despair, (Haydock) upbraids him as a new Zambri, who might expect a similar fate, 3 Kings xvi. (Calmet) --- The name of Zambri was used proverbially to denote an ungrateful rebel; as with us Judas is used for a traitor. (Tirinus)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on 2 Kings 9:31". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/2-kings-9.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Had Zimri peace . . . ? Figure of speech Erotesis. App-6. See 1 Kings 16:9-20. Suggesting the wisdom of coming to terms with her.

master = lord.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 2 Kings 9:31". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/2-kings-9.html. 1909-1922.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(31) And as . . . she said.—And Jehu had come into the gate, and she said.

Had Zimri . . . master?—Rather, Art well (literally, Is it peace), thou Zimri, his master’s murderer? The “Is it peace?” which Jezebel addresses to Jehu, appears to be an ironical greeting. Thenius explains: “Is there to be peace or war between me and thee, the rebel?” referring to the same phrase in 2 Kings 9:17-19; 2 Kings 9:22, supra. The phrase is vague enough to admit of many meanings, according to circumstances. Perhaps Jezebel, in her mood of desperate defiance, repeats the question which Jehoram had thrice asked of Jehu, as a hint that she herself is now the sovereign to whom Jehu owes an account of his doings. She goes on to call him a second Zimri—i.e., a regicide like him who slew Baasha, and likely to enjoy as brief a reign as he. (See 1 Kings 16:15-18.)

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on 2 Kings 9:31". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/2-kings-9.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And as Jehu entered in at the gate, she said, Had Zimri peace, who slew his master?
Zimri
1 Kings 16:9-20
peace
Reciprocal: Numbers 16:27 - and stood;  1 Kings 16:10 - Zimri;  1 Kings 16:15 - seven;  2 Kings 9:14 - conspired;  2 Kings 15:10 - slew him;  1 Chronicles 2:6 - Zimri

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 2 Kings 9:31". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/2-kings-9.html.