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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

2 Samuel 11:3

So David sent and inquired about the woman. And one said, "Is this not Bathsheba, the daughter of Eliam, the wife of Uriah the Hittite?"

Adam Clarke Commentary

The daughter of Eliam - Called, 1 Chronicles 3:5, Ammiel; a word of the same meaning, The people of my God, The God of my people. This name expressed the covenant - I will be your God; We will be thy people.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 11:3". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/2-samuel-11.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Eliam - Or Ammiel, 1 Chronicles 3:5, the component words being placed in an inverse order. Bath-sheba was the granddaughter of Ahithophel 2 Samuel 23:34.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 11:3". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/2-samuel-11.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And David sent and inquired after the woman,.... Who she was, what her name, and whether married or unmarried; if the latter, very probably his intention was to marry her, and he might, when he first made the inquiry, design to proceed no further, or to anything that was dishonourable; but it would have been better for him not to have inquired at all, and endeavoured to stifle the motions raised in him at the sight of her:

and one said, is not this Bathsheba, the daughter of Eliam; who in 1 Chronicles 3:5; is called Bathshua, and her father Ammiel, which is the same with Eliam reversed:

the wife of Uriah the Hittite? who either was of that nation originally, and became a proselyte; or had sojourned there for a while, and took the name or had it given him, for some exploit he had performed against that people, as Scipio Africanus, and others among the Romans; this was said by one that David inquired of, or heard him asking about her, and was sufficient to have stopped him from proceeding any further, when he was informed she was another man's wife: some sayF8Shalshalet Hakabala, fol. 8. 2. she was the daughter of Ahithophel's son; see 2 Samuel 23:34.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 11:3". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/2-samuel-11.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

And David sent and enquired after the woman. And [one] said, [Is] not this Bathsheba, the daughter of Eliam, the wife of Uriah the c Hittite?

(c) Who was not an born an Israelite, but converted to the true religion.

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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 11:3". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/2-samuel-11.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

one said — literally, “he said to himself,”

Is not this Bath-sheba? etc. — She seems to have been a celebrated beauty, whose renown had already reached the ears of David, as happens in the East, from reports carried by the women from harem to harem.

Bath-sheba, the daughter of Eliam — or Ammiel (1 Chronicles 3:5), one of David‘s worthies (2 Samuel 23:34), and son of Ahithophel.


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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 11:3". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/2-samuel-11.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

And David sent and enquired after the woman. And one said, Is not this Bathsheba, the daughter of Eliam, the wife of Uriah the Hittite?

He inquired — Instead of suppressing that desire which the sight of his eyes had kindled, he seeks rather to feed it; and first enquires who she was; that if she were unmarried, he might make her either his wife or his concubine.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 11:3". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/2-samuel-11.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

2 Samuel 11:3 And David sent and enquired after the woman. And [one] said, [Is] not this Bathsheba, the daughter of Eliam, the wife of Uriah the Hittite?

Ver. 3. And David sent and inquired after the woman,] viz., Who she was, and whether maid or wife. He should rather have checked himself for looking and lusting after a forbidden beauty - he should have taken an antidote of mortification, before the venom of lust had got to the vitals. But it is hard for him who hath fallen down the ladder of hell a round or two, to stop or step back, till he come to the bottom, without extraordinary help from the hand of Heaven. Can a man commit one sin more, and but one sin more? Unclean creatures went by couples into the ark: so do sins into the soul. Fornication is the devil’s nest-egg, saith one, and causeth many sins to be laid one to and upon another.

Is not this Bathsheba, the daughter of Eliam?] Or Ammiel, [1 Chronicles 3:5] who was the son of Ahithophel, [2 Samuel 23:34] who might, for the dishonour done by David to his niece Bathsheba, be the readier to conspire against him, and to take part with Absalom. (a)

The wife of Uriah the Hittite?] Bathsheba therefore was an honourable lady both by parentage and marriage, for both her father and husband were of the number of David’s worthies: the greater was his sin. Uriah might be called the Hittite, as Scipio was called Africanus, for doing some notable exploit against that accursed nation, the worst of the Canaanites. [Ezekiel 16:3]


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 11:3". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/2-samuel-11.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Instead of suppressing that lust which the sight of his eyes had kindled, he seeks rather to feed it; and first inquires who she was; that, if she were unmarried, he might make her either his wife or his concubine.

Bath-sheba, called also Bath-shuah, 1 Chronicles 3:5, where also Eliam is called Ammiel. The Hittite; so called, either,

1. By his original, being born either of that race, but become a zealous proselyte; or, at least. among that people. Or,

2. By his habitation among them. Or,

3. For some notable exploit of his against that people: see 1 Samuel 26:6, and See Poole "2 Samuel 8:18".


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 2 Samuel 11:3". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/2-samuel-11.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

3. A woman washing herself — For the sake of healthfulness and refreshment after the heats of a summer day. But her washing in such an exposed place was imprudent and immodest, and has justly subjected her to the charge of a desire to be seen.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 11:3". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/2-samuel-11.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

2 Samuel 11:3. David sent and inquired after the woman — Thus, instead of suppressing that desire which the sight of his eyes had kindled, he seeks rather to feed it; and first inquires who she was; that if she were unmarried he might make her either his wife or his concubine. And one said, Is not this Bath-sheba? — This seems to have been an answer given by some one to David’s inquiry. Uriah is called a Hittite, because he was such by nation, but a proselyte to the Jewish religion; and for his valour made one of the king’s guards among the Cherethites and the Pelethites; which was the reason, perhaps, that he had a house so near the king’s.


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Bibliography
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 11:3". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/2-samuel-11.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Eliam. By a transposition of letters, he is called Ammiel, in 1 Paralipomenon iii. 5. Both words signify "my people is God's." This son of Achitophel (chap. xxiii. 34,) was one of David's valiant men, as well as Urias, who is styled the Hethite, being born at Eth; (St. Jerome; Salien) or on account of his extraction, or because he or his ancestors (Haydock) had performed some great exploit against that nation; as Germanicus, Africanus, &c., received those titles among the Romans, for conquering the Germans, &c. (Calmet) --- Eth was a place near Hebron. (Adrichomius 128.) (Menochius) --- The name of Bethsabee is also different in Paralipomenon; the last b in Hebrew being changed into v. Both-shua, both-al-i-am; instead of Both-shoba, both-am-i-al. (Haydock) (Kennicott) --- The grandfather of Bethsabee is supposed to have revolted against David, to revenge the wrong done to her. (Tirinus; Cornelius a Lapide) "Let the weak tremble at the fall of the strong." (St. Augustine, in Psalm l.)


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 11:3". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/2-samuel-11.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Bath-sheba. Called Bath-shua, 1 Chronicles 3:5.

Eliam. Called "Ammiel", 1 Chronicles 3:5. The son of Ahithophel (2 Samuel 23:34).

Uriah. One of David"s faithful soldiers (2 Samuel 23:39. Married the daughter of Eliam (2 Samuel 11:3), who was the son of Ahithophel (2 Samuel 23:34). This relationship probably led to Ahithophel"s disloyalty (2 Samuel 15:12).


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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 11:3". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/2-samuel-11.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And David sent and inquired after the woman. And one said, Is not this Bathsheba, the daughter of Eliam, the wife of Uriah the Hittite?

One said - literally, he said to himself.

Is not this Bath-sheba ... , [ Bat-Sheba` (Hebrew #1339), daughter of the oath; or Bath-shua (1 Chronicles 3:5); Septuagint, Beersabee.] She seems to have been a celebrated beauty, whose renown had already reached the ears of David, as happens in the East, from reports carried by the women from harem to harem.

Bath-sheba, the daughter of Eliam - or Ammiel (1 Chronicles 3:5), one of David's worthies (2 Samuel 23:34), and son of Ahithophel.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 11:3". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/2-samuel-11.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(3) Bath-sheba, the daughter of Eliam.—Her name is spelt in Chronicles Bath-shua, and her father’s name is said to be Ammiel. Ammiel and Eliam are the same name with its component parts transposed, as Scripture names are often varied: God’s people and the people of God.

Wife of Uriah the Hittite.—His name appears (2 Samuel 23:39) in the list of David’s thirty chief heroes, and the whole story represents him as a brave and noble-minded soldier. David had now given rein to his guilty passion so far that the knowledge of Bath-sheba’s being a married woman, and the wife of one of his chief warriors, does not check him.


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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 11:3". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/2-samuel-11.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And David sent and enquired after the woman. And one said, Is not this Bathsheba, the daughter of Eliam, the wife of Uriah the Hittite?
sent
Jeremiah 5:8; Hosea 7:6,7; James 1:14,15
Bath-sheba
or, Bath-shua. Eliam. or, Ammiel.
1 Chronicles 3:5
Uriah
23:39; 1 Chronicles 11:41

Copyright Statement
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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 11:3". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/2-samuel-11.html.

Lectionary Calendar
Sunday, July 12th, 2020
the Week of Proper 10 / Ordinary 15
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