Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

2 Samuel 21:16

Then Ishbi-benob, who was among the descendants of the giant, the weight of whose spear was three hundred shekels of bronze in weight, was girded with a new sword, and he intended to kill David.
New American Standard

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Armies;   Championship;   David;   Goliath;   Ishbi-Benob;   Rapha;   Thompson Chain Reference - Giants;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Philistines, the;   Rephaim, or Giants, the;   Spear;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Abishai;   Ishbibenob;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Abishai;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Anakim;   Copper;   Giants;   Ishbi-Benob;   Philistines;   Rephaim;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Abishai;   Anakim;   Giants;   Ishbi-Benob;   Metals;   Philistia;   Samuel, the Books of;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Abishai;   Bronze;   Giants;   Gob;   Ishbibenob;   Samuel, Books of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Abishai;   David;   Giant;   Haggai;   Ishbi-Benob;   Israel;   Kenites;   Samuel, Books of;   Shamgar;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Arms;   Giant;   Ishbibenob ;   Rapha ;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Giants;   Ishbibenob;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Abishai;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Copper,;   Ish'bi-Be'nob;   Metals;  
Encyclopedias:
Condensed Biblical Cyclopedia - Hebrew Monarchy, the;   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Ahiman;   David;   Giants;   Ishbi-Benob;   New;   Philistines;   Rapha;   Samuel, Books of;   Kitto Biblical Cyclopedia - Abishai;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Cain;   Copper;   Giants;   Goliath;   Shamgar;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Being girded with a new sword - As the word sword is not in the original, we may apply the term new to his armor in general; he had got new arms, a new coat of mail, or something that defended him well, and rendered him very formidable: or it may mean a strong or sharp sword.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 21:16". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/2-samuel-21.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Ishbi-benob - A corrupt reading. The whole passage should perhaps run thus: “And David waxed faint. So they halted in Gob (as in 2 Samuel 21:18-19). And there was a man (in Gob) which was of the sons of the giant, etc.”

Sons of the giant - The “giant” here 2 Samuel 21:18, 2 Samuel 21:20, 2 Samuel 21:22 is “ha-Raphah,” whence, the “Rephaim” Genesis 14:5; Deuteronomy 2:11. The sons of Ha-raphah, or Rephaim, are different from the “Nephilim,” or Giants Genesis 6:4; Numbers 13:33. The sons of Anak were not strictly Rephaim, but Nephilim.

Three hundred shekels of brass - About eight pounds. Goliath‘s spear‘s head weighed “six hundred shekels of iron.”

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 21:16". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/2-samuel-21.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And Ishbibenob, which was of the sons of the giant,.... Of Goliath, or of a giant, of the race of them:

the weight of whose spear weighed three hundred shekels of brass in weight; which must be understood either of the wood of it, or of the head of it, the flaming point of it, as many interpret it; and if so, it was but half the weight of Goliath's spear, unless there was any difference of the weight of iron and of brass, see 1 Samuel 17:7,

he being girded with a new sword; or rather with a new girdle, as the Targum; and so Jarchi, which might be given him as a mark of honour, or as a token of his having a commission in the army:

thought to have slain David; his aim was at him, and perceiving him faint and feeble, thought to take the advantage of it, and dispatch him.

Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 21:16". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/2-samuel-21.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

And Ishbibenob, which [was] of the sons of l the giant, the weight of whose spear [weighed] three hundred m [shekels] of brass in weight, he being girded with a new [sword], thought to have slain David.

(l) Or, of Haraphah, the race of giants.

(m) Which amounts to 9 3/4 pounds.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 21:16". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/2-samuel-21.html. 1599-1645.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

2 Samuel 21:16 And Ishbibenob, which [was] of the sons of the giant, the weight of whose spear [weighed] three hundred [shekels] of brass in weight, he being girded with a new [sword], thought to have slain David.

Ver. 15. Which was of the sons of the giant.] Such as were those before the flood, and the Zamzummims, [Deuteronomy 2:20] and that Gabbara in Pliny brought out of Arabia, under the empire of Claudius, who was nine feet and nine inches high.

Thought to have slain David.] This happened, saith Josephus, when the enemies being put to flight, David pursued them before all others.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 21:16". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/2-samuel-21.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

The giant; so called by way of eminency. Or, of Rapha, a giant so called.

The weight of whose spear weighed three hundred shekels: see 1 Samuel 17:5.

With a new sword, or rather, with a new girdle or belt; for, first, This was the usual habit of soldiers, 1 Samuel 18:4 2 Samuel 18:11 1 Kings 2:5 Isaiah 5:27, and when it was of an extraordinary fashion and price, an ensign of dignity and command in the army, Ezekiel 23:15. So this may be mentioned to note that this was the first time either of his going out to fight, or of his advancement to some eminent place in the army; which made him desirous to signalize himself with some great action. Secondly, This supplement is more natural and usual, the word girdle being easily supplied from the word

being girded; such ellipses of conjugate words being frequent in the Hebrew tongue, as Numbers 11:14 Psalms 76:12 Matthew 20:12. Thirdly, The newness of the sword seems to have no emphasis nor significancy for the present purpose, seeing an old and tried sword would seem more considerable for his encouragement than one new and unproved.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 2 Samuel 21:16". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/2-samuel-21.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

16.Ishbi-benob — The name means, his dwelling on the hill, and was perhaps given him on account of some high citadel or castle which he occupied.

Sons of the giant — Or, sons of Raphah. On the ancient giant race, Rephaim, compare Genesis 14:5; Genesis 15:20; and Deuteronomy 3:11. The word Raphah (or Rapha, as in 1 Chronicles 20:4) seems to have been the proper name of the father of a race of giants that dwelt among the Philistines, but he was doubtless related to the more ancient Rephaim.

Weight of whose spear — The reference is doubtless to the metal head of his spear.

Three hundred shekels — About nine pounds, half the weight of Goliath’s. See 1 Samuel 17:7.

New sword — Better to supply the word armour in place of sword. His entire military garb was new.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 21:16". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/2-samuel-21.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Jesbibenob may signify, "Jesbi, the son of Ob." Septuagint, "Jesbe, of Nob, who was of the race of the giants." Arapha seems to have been one of great fame, (ver. 18, 21, 22) who had several children; unless other giants assumed his name. (Calmet) --- Ounces. Hebrew, "sicles of brass, in weight." Sicles is only understood, as on similar occasions. Neither is sword expressed; (Haydock) so that some think he had on a new suit of armour. Symmachus, "a sword." Roman Septuagint, "a club." The weight of the whole spear is specified in Hebrew, Septuagint, &c., (Calmet) as weighing "300---of brass," (Haydock) of which metal it seems to have been formed, as the Jews had no such money till the captivity. (Calmet)

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 21:16". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/2-samuel-21.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

giant = Rapha. See App-23and App-25,

thought to have slain, or, said he would slay.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 21:16". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/2-samuel-21.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And Ishbibenob, which was of the sons of the giant, the weight of whose spear weighed three hundred shekels of brass in weight, he being girded with a new sword, thought to have slain David.

Ishbi-benob (Ishbe-benob, the Qeri') - his (my) dwelling is at Nob.

Which was of the sons of the giant, [ haa-Raapaah (Hebrew #7497), with the article (cf. 1 Chronicles 20:4; 1 Chronicles 20:6; 1 Chronicles 20:8); Septuagint, en tois ekgonois tou Rafa (with the article also)] - the founder of a class or family remarkable for their strength and stature. In earlier times the Rephaim were a numerous race, inhabiting the regions east of Jordan and various parts in the south of Palestine; but in David's time only a few individuals of that description remained, and these were found among the Philistines.

Thought to have slain David. Although David in the early part of his reign had, by his military energy and signal victories, effectively humbled the power of the Philistines, the appearance of any powerful champion among them revived their hopes and stimulated the hostile spirit of those restless neighbours. It was on one of these occasions, when they had provoked a war, that David went at the head of his army to oppose their further turbulence, when, exhausted with fatigue and the infirmities of age, he was attacked during the contest, and nearly disabled by Ishbi-benob, when Abishai rushed to his aid and slew the monster. But such an occurrence created more than a momentary alarm; and his officers, determined not to expose so precious a life to a similar risk, exacted a solemn promise from the aged king that he would henceforth leave the command of the army to his generals.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 21:16". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/2-samuel-21.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(16) Ishbi-benob.—The name is a strange one, and it is generally thought that some error has crept into the text, but none of the suggested emendations are free from difficulty. Perhaps the most probable is that in the Speaker’s Commentary, by which for Ishbi (the Hebrew margin) they halted is read, and benob, by a very slight change in one letter, becomes at Gob; then a clause is supplied, there was a man, so that the whole reads, “David waxed faint, and they halted at Gob. And there was a man which was of the sons,” &c.; 2 Samuel 21:18 (as well as 2 Samuel 21:19) seems to imply a previous battle in Gob.

Three hundred shekels.—About eight pounds; just half the weight of Goliath’s spear-head (1 Samuel 17:7).

Girded with a new sword.—The word sword is not in the original, and its omission, where intended, is unusual. Either it should be girded with new armour, or else the word for new is intended to denote some otherwise unknown weapon.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 21:16". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/2-samuel-21.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And Ishbibenob, which was of the sons of the giant, the weight of whose spear weighed three hundred shekels of brass in weight, he being girded with a new sword, thought to have slain David.
of the sons
Genesis 6:4; Numbers 13:32,33; Deuteronomy 1:28; 2:10,21; 3:11; 9:2; 1 Samuel 17:4,5
the giant
or, Rapha.
18,20; *marg:; 5:18; Genesis 14:5
whose spear
Heb. the staff, or, the head. thought.
1 Samuel 17:45-51
Reciprocal: Joshua 11:22 - only in Gaza;  Psalm 33:16 - mighty;  Psalm 87:4 - this man;  Psalm 144:10 - who delivereth;  Hebrews 11:34 - escaped

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 2 Samuel 21:16". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/2-samuel-21.html.