Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

2 Timothy 3:17

so that the man of God may be adequate, equipped for every good work.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Holiness;   Minister, Christian;   Perfection;   Word of God;   Works;   Thompson Chain Reference - Leaders;   Man;   Men of God;   Ministers;   Perfection;   Perfection-Imperfection;   Religious;   The Topic Concordance - Doctrine;   Instruction;   Reproof;   Scripture;   Teaching;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Conduct, Christian;   Holiness;   Perfection;   Scriptures, the;   Titles and Names of Saints;   Works, Good;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Education;   Good works;   Guidance;   Perseverance;   Preaching;   Temptation;   Trinity;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Elder;   Law;   Timothy, First and Second, Theology of;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Jesus Christ;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Igdaliah;   Solomon;   Timothy, the Second Epistle to;   Tradition;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Scripture;   2 Timothy;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Perfection;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Brotherly Love;   Conscience ;   Perfect Perfection;   Timothy and Titus Epistles to;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Inspiration;   Scripture;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Excommunication;   Wilson's Dictionary of Bible Types - Perfect;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Lutherans;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Complete;   Furnish;  
Devotionals:
Chip Shots from the Ruff of Life - Devotion for August 31;   Daily Light on the Daily Path - Devotion for November 6;   Every Day Light - Devotion for November 4;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

That the man of God - The preacher of righteousness, the minister of the Gospel, the person who derives his commission from God, and always appears as his herald and servant.

May be perfect - Αρτιος· From αρω, to fit or adapt. It properly signifies an integer or whole number in arithmetic, to which nothing needs to be added to make it complete.

Throughly furnished - Εξηρτισμενος· From εξ, intensive, and αρτιος, complete; see above. Not only complete in himself as to his integrity, religious knowledge, faith in Jesus, and love to God and man, but that he should have all those qualifications which are necessary to complete the character, and insure the success of a preacher, of the Gospel. Timothy was to teach, reprove, correct, and instruct others; and was to be to them a pattern of good works.

From what the apostle says here concerning the qualifications of a Christian minister, we may well exclaim: Who is capable of these things? Is it such a person as has not intellect sufficient for a common trade or calling? No. A preacher of the Gospel should be a man of the soundest sense, the most cultivated mind, the most extensive experience, one who is deeply taught of God, and who has deeply studied man; one who has prayed much, read much, and studied much; one who takes up his work as from God, does it as before God, and refers all to the glory of God; one who abides under the inspiration of the Almighty, and who has hidden the word of God in his heart, that he might not sin against him. No minister formed by man can ever be such as is required here. The school of Christ, and that alone, can ever form such a preacher.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:17". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/2-timothy-3.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

That the man of God may be perfect - The object is not merely to convince and to convert him; it is to furnish all the instruction needful for his entire perfection. The idea here is, not that any one is absolutely perfect, but that the Scriptures have laid down the way which leads to perfection, and that, if any one were perfect, he would find in the Scriptures all the instruction which he needed in those circumstances. There is no deficiency in the Bible for man, in any of the situations in which he may be placed in life; and the whole tendency of the book is to make him who will put himself fairly under its instructions, absolutely perfect.

Thoroughly furnished unto all good works - Margin, “perfected.” The Greek means, to bring to an end; to make complete. The idea is, that whatever good work the man of God desires to perform, or however perfect he aims to be, he will find no deficiency in the Scriptures, but will find there the most ample instructions that he needs. He can never advance so far, as to become forsaken of his guide. He can never make such progress, as to have gone in advance of the volume of revealed truth, and to be thrown upon his own resources in a region which was not thought of by the Author of the Bible. No new phase of human affairs can appear in which it will not direct him; no new plan of benevolence can be started, for which he will not find principles there to guide him; and he can make no progress in knowledge or holiness, where he will not feel that his holy counsellor is in advance of him still, and that it is capable of conducting him even yet into higher and purer regions. Let us, then, study and prize the Bible. It is a holy and a safe guide. It has conducted millions along the dark and dangerous way of life, and has never led one astray. The human mind, in its investigations of truth, has never gone beyond its teachings; nor has man ever advanced into a region so bright that its light has become dim, or where it has not thrown its beams of glory on still far distant objects. We are often in circumstances in which we feel that we have reached the outer limit of what man can teach us; but we never get into such circumstance in regard to the Word of God.

How precious is the book divine,

By, inspiration given!

Bright as a lamp its doctrines shine.

To guide our souls to heaven.

It sweetly cheers our drooping hearts.

In this dark vale of tears:

Life, light, and joy, it still imparts,

And quells our rising fears.

This lamp, through all the tedious night.

Of life, shall guide our way;

Till we behold the clearer light.

Of an eternal day.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:17". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/2-timothy-3.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

that the man of God may be complete, furnished completely unto every good work.

The man of God here is not merely Timothy. "Man" is generic and means "human being." All persons who walk in the way of God are made complete and completely furnished unto every good work by the Holy Scriptures. As Lenski said:

The value of these two verses (2 Timothy 3:16,17) is beyond question. It is a proof passage for verbal inspiration and for much more besides. As a proof passage it is outstanding and yet forms only a part of the entire volume of proof and evidence for verbal inspiration. It is one of the peaks in the Rocky Mountain range that establishes "The Impregnable Rock of Holy Scripture" (Gladstone) as inspired.[30]

Before leaving this incredibly important passage, we shall explore a little further the Scriptural evidence bearing upon the subject of INSPIRATION.

THE INSPIRATION OF THE BIBLE

First of all, and most importantly, our Lord himself believed in the inspiration of the Old Testament.

Matthew 4:4ff. Our Lord, the Redeemer and Saviour of the human race, in his confrontation with the prince of evil at the time of Jesus' great temptation, turned aside every thrust of Satan with the words, "It is written ... it is written ... and again it is written." Is it possible to believe that the Lord of Life in such a confrontation would have appealed to a book that was merely human, fallible or untrustworthy?

Matthew 19:5ff. "God (he who created man) said, For this cause shall a man leave his father and his mother, etc." Jesus said this, thus attributing the authorship of Genesis to the Creator of the world.

John 10:34-36. In this passage, Jesus referred to the Old Testament as "your law ... the Scriptures ... the word of God," adding that "the Scriptures cannot be broken."

Matthew 22:29. Jesus attributed the ignorance of the Sadducees to the fact of their not "knowing the Scriptures."

Luke 24:25. Jesus denounced as "foolish" those who did not "believe all" that stands in the Scripture.

Jesus frequently explained occurrences as coming to pass "that the Scriptures might be fulfilled" (Mark 14:49; John 13:18; 17:12; Mark 12:13, etc.), indicating his utmost confidence that everything in the holy Scriptures would indeed be fulfilled. Of course, as Warfield said, Jesus made such appeals upon the basis "of his ascription of it (the Bible) to God as the author of it."[31]

Secondly, the holy apostles implicitly believed in the total accuracy, infallibility and inspiration of the sacred Scriptures, further proof that Jesus was also the source of that belief; for it is inconceivable that they would have believed such a thing unless it had been taught to them by the Master. 2 Timothy 3:16,17. See discussion above.

2 Peter 1:21. "But no prophecy ever came by the will of man: but men spake from God, being moved by the Holy Spirit." This passage says all that Paul said in the passage above. Furthermore, "prophecy" must be understood in the sense of "all scripture" and not limited to predictive elements. The source of Scripture is God; Scriptures were spoken by man indeed; but the men who spoke it spoke "from God."

The total preaching of the apostles was geared to the conviction that the gospel they delivered was prophetically unfolded in the Old Testament. The death, burial and resurrection of Christ were "according to the Scriptures" (1 Corinthians 15:3,4). When Judas betrayed the Lord, it was "because it is written" (Acts 1:20). The Bereans were "more noble" because they tested even the preaching of apostles "searching the Scriptures to see whether these things were so" (Acts 17:11). Dozens of other examples could be cited, every one of which testifies to the apostolic confidence in the inspiration of the Old Testament (and of the New Testament as well).

This same certainty of its inspiration pertains also to the New Testament.

We have already observed Paul's frequent use of the ancient formula "He saith," or simply "Saith" in the Greek to introduce sections of his own writings (Romans 15:10; 1 Corinthians 6:16; 2 Corinthians 6:2; Galatians 3:16; Ephesians 4:8; 5:14, etc.). Warfield noted that "saith," standing without the pronoun in the writing of the apostles always meant "God saith." "For who could be the speaker of the words of Scripture but God only?"[32] How deplorable it is, therefore, that some commentators and translators supply the pronoun "it" (meaning the Old Testament); and then when they cannot find the passage Paul "quoted," they accuse him of garbling or misquotation! when the truth is that Paul was writing, not quoting Scripture. Paul possibly referred to Luke's gospel in 2 Timothy 2:8; and in 1 Timothy 5:18 he certainly quoted from Luke 10:7. Likewise Peter recognized the inspiration of Paul's writings even regarding some things "hard to be understood" (2 Peter 3:16).

Our Lord made an argument for immortality and the resurrection to depend upon a single word, the verb "I AM," and the tense of it at that. Paul also made an argument relative to the whole Christian religion on a single word, the noun "seed," and the number of it! Those who believe in the Lord and his holy apostles have no trouble whatever with the doctrine of inspiration, despite there being many things concerning it which we shall never be able to understand.

Regarding the inspiration of the New Testament, Jesus promised the apostles, "It is not ye that speak but the Spirit of your Father that speaketh in you" (Matthew 10:10), and also that "he (the Spirit) will bring to your remembrance whatsoever I have said unto you" (John 14:26), and that "he will teach you all things" (John 14:26), and that "he will guide you unto all truth" (John 16:13), and that "he will declare unto you the things that are to come" (John 16:13). The consent of Christians in all ages has viewed these expressions as certification of New Testament inspiration, a fact attested by the apostolic writings having been bound (in the form of the New Testament) to the Old Testament which preceded it, thus forming the Bible, all of which is inspired.

Unintentionally, the enemies of the New Testament are themselves a witness in favor of its inspiration, because of the inordinate amount of time and effort expended by them in their vain efforts to discredit even a single line of it. Why do they not spend similar time and energies in efforts to prove the Declaration of Independence, the Magna Carta, or the works of William Shakespeare to be forgeries, fraudulent or unreliable? Simply because they know instinctively that the New Testament is the word of God, therefore far more important, and much more challenging to their evil genius.

[30] R. C. H. Lenski, op. cit., p. 848.

[31] Benjamin B. Warfield, ISBE, Vol. III, p. 1477.

Copyright Statement
Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:17". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/2-timothy-3.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

That the man of God may be perfect,.... By the man of God may be meant everyone that in a special relation belongs to God; who is chosen by God the Father, redeemed by the Son, and called by the Spirit; but more especially a minister of the Gospel; for as it was usual to call a prophet under the Old Testament by this name, it seems to be transferred from thence to a minister of the New Testament, see 1 Timothy 6:11 and the design of the Scriptures and the end of writing them are, that both preachers of the word, and hearers of it, might have a perfect knowledge of the will of God; that the former might be a complete minister of the Gospel, and that nothing might be wanting for the information of the latter:

thoroughly furnished unto all good works, or "every good work"; particularly to the work of the ministry, which is a good one; and to every part and branch of it, a thorough furniture for which lies in the holy Scriptures; from whence, as scribes well instructed in the kingdom of heaven, do Gospel ministers bring forth things new and old, both for delight and profit: though this may be also applied to all good works in common, which the Scriptures point unto, give directions about, as well as show where strength is to be had to perform them.

Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:17". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/2-timothy-3.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

That the e man of God may be perfect, throughly furnished unto all good works.

(e) The Prophets and expounders of God's will are properly and distinctly called, men of God.
Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:17". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/2-timothy-3.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

man of God — (See on 1 Timothy 6:11).

perfect, throughly furnishedGreek, “thoroughly perfected,” and so “perfect.” The man of God is perfectly accoutred out of Scripture for his work, whether he be a minister (compare 2 Timothy 4:2 with 2 Timothy 3:16) or a spiritual layman. No oral tradition is needed to be added.

Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:17". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/2-timothy-3.html. 1871-8.

Robertson's Word Pictures in the New Testament

The man of God (ο του τεου αντρωποςho tou theou anthrōpos). See note on 1 Timothy 6:11.

May be complete (ινα ηι αρτιοςhina ēi artios). Final clause with ιναhina and present subjunctive of ειμιeimi ΑρτιοςArtios is old word (from root αρωarō to fit), specially adapted, here only in N.T.

Furnished completely (εχηρτισμενοςexērtismenos). Perfect passive participle of εχαρτιζωexartizō rare verb, to furnish (fit) fully (perfective use of εχex), in N.T. only here and Acts 21:5. In Josephus. For καταρτιζωkatartizō see note on Luke 6:40; 2 Corinthians 13:11.

Copyright Statement
The Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament. Copyright Broadman Press 1932,33, Renewal 1960. All rights reserved. Used by permission of Broadman Press (Southern Baptist Sunday School Board)
Bibliographical Information
Robertson, A.T. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:17". "Robertson's Word Pictures of the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rwp/2-timothy-3.html. Broadman Press 1932,33. Renewal 1960.

Vincent's Word Studies

Perfect ( ἄρτιος )

N.T.olxx. Rev. complete; but the idea is rather that of mutual, symmetrical adjustment of all that goes to make the man: harmonious combination of different qualities and powers. Comp. κατάρτισις perfecting 2 Corinthians 13:9: καταρτισμός perfecting(as accomplished), Ephesians 4:12: καταρτίσαι makeperfect or bring into complete adjustment, Hebrews 13:21.

Thoroughly furnished ( ἐξηρτισμένος )

The same root as ἄρτιος . It fills out the idea ἄρτιος ; fitted out. Only here and Acts 11:5(note). oClass.

Unto all good works ( πρὸς πᾶν ἔργον ἀγαθὸν )

More correctly, every good work. Any writing which can produce such profitable results vindicates itself as inspired of God. It is to be noted that the test of the divine inspiration of Scripture is here placed in its practical usefulness.

Copyright Statement
The text of this work is public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Vincent, Marvin R. DD. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:17". "Vincent's Word Studies in the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/vnt/2-timothy-3.html. Charles Schribner's Sons. New York, USA. 1887.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

That the man of God may be perfect, throughly furnished unto all good works.

That the man of God — He that is united to and approved of God.

May be perfect — Blameless himself, and throughly furnished - By the scripture, either to teach, reprove, correct, or train up others.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:17". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/2-timothy-3.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

Да будет совершен (целокупен). Целокупность означает здесь совершенство, в котором нет никакой ущербности. Апостол просто говорит о том, что Писание достаточно для совершенства. Поэтому всякий, не довольствующийся Писанием, хочет мудрствовать больше, чем должно и полезно. Но здесь возникает вопрос: поскольку Павел говорил только о том Писании, которое называлось Ветхим Заветом, как же он мог сказать, что оно усовершает человека со всех сторон? Ведь, если это так, все, что впоследствии добавили к Писанию апостолы, кажется излишним. Отвечаю: относительно сути Писания не было добавлено ничего. Ибо все, содержащееся в сочинениях апостолов, есть лишь чистое и подлинное объяснение закона и пророков, соединенное с предъявлением того, что было в них изложено. Поэтому Павел вполне обоснованно украсил Писания подобной похвалою. И коль скоро сегодня с приходом Евангелия учение Писания стало полнее и яснее, нам остается сказать разве что следующее: надо твердо надеяться (На будущее), что упомянутая Павлом польза проявится гораздо больше в том случае, если мы полюбим получать и видеть ее в своей жизни.

 

 

 

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Calvin, John. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:17". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/2-timothy-3.html. 1840-57.

Scofield's Reference Notes

perfect

complete. (See Scofield "Matthew 5:48").

Copyright Statement
These files are considered public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available in the Online Bible Software Library.
Bibliographical Information
Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on 2 Timothy 3:17". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/2-timothy-3.html. 1917.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

17 That the man of God may be perfect, throughly furnished unto all good works.

Ver. 17. That the man of God] The minister, and so consequently the people too, for whose use the minister hath all. This is observed of them, that still the scholar goes one step farther than the teacher.

May be perfect] αρτιος ( omnibus numeris absotutus), with a perfection of parts, able and apt to make use of the Holy Scriptures to all the former purposes, for the behoof or benefit of his hearers. The authority of the Fathers, saith a grave and learned divine, I never urge for necessity of proof (the Scripture is thereto all-sufficient and superabundant), but only either in some singular points to show consent; or, 2. In our controversies against anti-christians, anti-nomists, Neopelagians; or, 3. When some honest passage of sanctification or seasonable opposition to the corruption of the times is falsely charged with novelty, singularity, and too much preciseness. (Mr Bolton’s Four Last Things.)

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:17". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/2-timothy-3.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

2 Timothy 3:17. That the man of God may be perfect, "That the furniture of the man of God may be complete, and that he may be thoroughly fitted for every good work which his holy calling may require."

Inferences.—Must we not, on the survey of this chapter, in comparison with what we every day behold in life, cry out, "Verily, these are the last days?" They are assuredly times of difficulty and peril. Self-love, pride, ingratitude, treachery, intemperance, insolence, the contempt of all authority, human and divine, each, all of these characters may too plainly declare it: but none with more striking evidence than the excessive love of pleasure, on which so many are doting to destruction, while every consideration, both of religion and of prudence, falls at the shrine of this favourite idol. Men are lovers of pleasure more than lovers of God, more than lovers of their families, yea, though self-interest be in many instances so scandalously pursued, yet more than lovers of themselves; and when they have sacrificed every thing else to their gain, they sacrifice even that gain to luxury. And would to God there were none such, even among those that retain the form of godliness, which so many indeed have scornfully cast off. But O! how vain the form, where the power of it is thus denied! And how peculiarly scandalous are these characters in those who call themselves teachers of religion! Yet to such they are here originally applied; and their race is not yet extinct.

Blessed be God, there are those yet remaining who are the happy reverse of these; ministers, who can appeal to the consciences of men, as to their doctrine, their conversation, their resolution, their fidelity, their gentleness, their charity, and their patience. Happy are they, how ill soever they may be treated in the world! Happy would they be, though exposed to all the terrors of persecution which the apostles and their first followers endured! but we are all warned to prepare for some degree of it; and indeed who can wonder if, amid so many evils, they who will not go on with the multitude, should sometimes be rudely pressed by them; and it may be, in some instances, cast down and trampled under foot. But be it so; though cast down, they shall not be destroyed: (2 Corinthians 4:9.) A little time will balance all. An hour of eternity will more than balance it. Let us guard against the deceits by which so many suffer. Let us guard, above all, against those deceits which men practise upon themselves, and whereby they hurt themselves infinitely more than all their fraud or violence can hurt any who are not accessary to their own undoing.

REFLECTIONS.—1st, The apostle apprizes Timothy of the dangerous days which were hastening on. This know also, that in the last days perilous times shall come, when sad corruptions, creeping into the church, shall make it difficult to preserve a pure conscience. For men shall be lovers of their ownselves, wholly devoted to the pursuits of their worldly honour and interests; covetous, insatiate after filthy lucre; proud, and vain-glorious boasters; blasphemers of God and man; disobedient to parents; unthankful to their benefactors; unholy in heart and conversation; without natural affection, which appears even in brutes; truce breakers, perfidious to the most solemn engagements; false accusers, like devils incarnate, blackening, with every opprobrious calumny, their opponents; incontinent, indulging every bestial appetite; fierce and furious in their tempers; despisers of those that are good, and treating men, far their betters, with contempt; traitors, false to their trusts, betraying their nearest friends; heady, driving furiously in their wicked courses, impatient of controul; high minded, puffed up with a vain conceit of their own superiority; lovers of pleasures more than lovers of God; and what is the aggravation of all their other abominations, in making great pretensions to piety, having a form of godliness and affecting rigid attachment to the externals of worship, but denying the power thereof, real enemies to vital religion: from such turn away, and shun them as the plague.

These corruptions began in the Gnostick's, who in the apostle's days appeared; and the perilous times advanced to their height, when the Roman pontiffs, after a train of diabolical practices, raised their blasphemous hierarchy, and consecrated their abominations. And to the papal apostacy are all these characters strikingly applicable.

2nd, The apostle proceeds,

1. To point out the artful and pernicious practices of the seducers. For of this sort are they which creep into houses, with every wheedling art, and lead captive silly women laden with sins, led away with divers lusts, imposing upon them with flattering speeches, and gaining them to their party, ever learning of these vain teachers, and never able to come to the knowledge of the truth, but bewildered in the endless mazes of error. Now as Jannes and Jambres withstood Moses, setting up their pretended miracles in opposition to his divine commission, so do these also resist the truth of the gospel—men of like corrupt minds as these Egyptian sorcerers, reprobate concerning the faith, rejected and abhorred of God.

2. He foretells that all their efforts should be impotent. But they shall proceed no further than the magicians did, nor be able essentially and finally to deceive the faithful saints of God; for an effectual check shall be given to them, and their folly shall be manifest unto all men, as theirs also was; and all their lying miracles shall be detected. Note; Error may, for a time, prevail; but truth shall finally be triumphant.

3rdly, Nothing could better serve to guard Timothy against these seducers, than the striking contrast between their conduct and that of the blessed Paul.

1. He reminds him of what he had seen. But thou hast fully known my doctrine, and the uniform tenor of my preaching; my exemplary manner of life, steady purpose to advance God's glory and the good of men's souls, unshaken faith, fervent charity, unwearied patience amid the many and grievous persecutions, afflictions which came unto me at Antioch, at Iconium, at Lystra: what persecutions I endured: but out of them all the Lord delivered me. With such an example Timothy should be animated to fidelity, and might surely expect the same supports and deliverances.

2. He informs him that suffering must be more or less every Christian's lot, and especially in those times. Yea, and all that will live godly in Christ Jesus, shall suffer persecution, of one kind or other, from mockery to martyrdom. There is indeed a godliness in form that the world speaks well of; but to be godly in Christ Jesus, in spirit and temper conformed to him, will ever render us abhorred of a world that lieth in wickedness.

3. He predicts the fatal end of these deceivers. But evil men and seducers shall wax worse and worse, hurried on from one excess of wickedness to another, deceiving and being deceived, till, having filled up the measure of their iniquities, they perish with the arch-deceiver in everlasting burnings.

4thly, As he would be exposed to great temptations, the apostle exhorts him to cleave to the Scriptures, as the only infallible guide to truth.

But continue thou in the things which thou hast learned, and hast been assured of, the pure and unadulterated doctrines of the gospel, which on the most satisfying evidence thou hast believed, knowing of whom thou hast learned them, even from me, divinely commissioned from the great Redeemer: and that from a child thou hast known the holy scriptures, early initiated in these sacred records, which are able to make thee wise unto salvation, through faith which is in Christ Jesus, who is the sum and substance of the whole, and to whom both the law and the prophets bear witness. All scripture is given by inspiration of God, both the Old and New Testament have the same divine original; and is profitable for doctrine, no doctrine demanding our credence and submission, but what can be clearly proved from thence; for reproof of errors, heresies, and all manner of evil; for correction of whatever is found amiss in the church; for instruction in righteousness, how holiness can be obtained, and how we can be enabled so to walk as to please God: that the man of God, the true believer, may be perfect, throughly instructed in all the mind of God, and furnished unto all good works, whether as a Christian for those of his station, or as a minister for the arduous service in which he is engaged. Note; (1.) Parents should betimes endeavour to lead their children to the Bible. (2.) All the volumes of mere human learning can never teach us so much wisdom as one page, one line of the book of God; after all these labours we must have been left to perish in ignorance; but in the oracles of truth, life and immortality are brought to light, and the poorest and most unlettered saint of God is wiser, in the things which make for his everlasting peace, than the deepest metaphysician, or the most profound philosopher. (3.) All scripture is of divine authority, therefore on God's testimony to be received with faith. Our wisdom, where any thing mysterious is revealed, is, not to reason, but to believe. (4.) The book of God is the Christian's great magazine; he can be in no state and condition, but he will there find direction, instruction, reproof, or comfort, exactly suited to his circumstances.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:17". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/2-timothy-3.html. 1801-1803.

Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

2 Timothy 3:17. ἵνα declares the purpose which Scripture is to serve.

ἄρτιος τοῦ θεοῦ ἄνθρωπος] ἄρτιος (literally, “adapted”) is a ἅπ. λεγ., equivalent to τέλειος, Colossians 1:28, “perfect;” according to Hofmann: “in suitable condition,” which, however, agrees with the notion of perfection.

τοῦ θεοῦ ἄνθρωπος] is mostly understood by expositors to denote those entrusted with the office of evangelist, and is referred specially to Timothy. The latter point is clearly wrong, since 2 Timothy 3:16 is general in sense; the apostle speaks here not of Timothy only, but of every one who is an ἄνθρ. τ. θεοῦ. Even although Timothy is so named in 1 Timothy 6:11 with reference to his office, it does not follow that here, where the thought is quite general, it is a name for the office; every believing Christian by his relation to God (van Oosterzee: “he who by the Holy Spirit is born of God and is related to God”) may receive the same name.

πρὸς πᾶν ἔργον ἀγαθὸν ἐξηρτισμένος] a more precise definition of ἄρτιος.

πᾶν ἔργ. ἀγ. is also, for the most part, understood to have an official reference. Bengel: genera talium operum enumerantur 2 Timothy 3:16; nam homo Dei debet docere, convincere, corrigere, instituere 2 Timothy 4:2. But this is wrong; it is rather to be taken quite generally (Wiesinger, van Oosterzee; de Wette differs). 2 Timothy 3:16 does not tell for what purpose Scripture may be used with others, but what is its influence on one who occupies himself with it; and though 2 Timothy 4:2 does deal with Timothy’s official work, that does not prove that πᾶν ἔργ. ἀγ. is only to be limited to this special thought.

ἐξηρτιομένος] equipped, Luther: “skilled.”

The same word occurs in Acts 21:5, but in another connection (see Meyer on the passage); corresponding to it we find κατηρτισμένος in Luke 6:40 and other passages.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Meyer, Heinrich. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:17". Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hmc/2-timothy-3.html. 1832.

Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament

2 Timothy 3:17. ἄρτιος may be perfect) in his duty.— τοῦ θεοῦ ἄνθρωπος, the man of God) 1 Timothy 6:11, note.— πρὸς πᾶν, for every good work) These kinds of such works are enumerated, 2 Timothy 3:16. For the man of God ought to teach, reprove, correct, train or instruct; comp. 2 Timothy 4:2.— ἐξηρτισμένος, thoroughly fitted or perfected [furnished]) by Scripture. He ought ἐξαρτίζεσθαι, to be thoroughly perfected, then he will be ἄρτιος, perfect. To become and to be differ.

—————

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Bengel, Johann Albrecht. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:17". Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jab/2-timothy-3.html. 1897.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

That the man of God may be perfect; that both ministers and all godly men may be as perfect as they can be in the state of mortality, fitted for the duties of their several callings and places.

Throughly furnished unto all good works; and be prepared to every work which is good, acceptable and well-pleasing unto God, whether it be a work of piety, or justice and charity. The Scripture, as to all, is so full a direction, that Christians need not go down to the Philistines to whet their tools, nor be beholden to unwritten traditions, or to the writings of pagan philosophers, for directions what to do, how to worship God, or manage any part of their conversation, either as to their general calling, or as to their particular relations.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:17". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/2-timothy-3.html. 1685.

Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture

совершен Способен выполнять все, к чему призвал его Господь (ср. Кол. 2:10).

Божий человек Обычный термин для обозначения проповедника Божьей истины. См. пояснение к 1Тим. 6:11.

приготовлен Удовлетворяет всем требованиям благочестивого служения и праведной жизни. Слово достигает этого не только в жизни человека Божия, но и в жизни всех, кто последует Ему (Еф. 4:11-13).

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
MacLaren, Alexander. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:17". Alexander MacLaren's Expositions of Holy Scripture. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mac/2-timothy-3.html.

Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament

The man of God; especially the religious teacher.

Perfect, thoroughly furnished; prepared and furnished on all sides.

Unto all good works; pertaining to him as a teacher. These include his life as well as his labors. As the Lord said to dead matter, "Let there be light," and there was light, Genesis 1:3; Psalms 33:6, Hebrews 1:2; so he speaks in Scripture to dark, dead souls, and they become light in the Lord. He who breathed into man the breath of life, and made him a living soul, breathed into Scripture a life-giving power. Hence it is called quick or life-giving and powerful, Hebrews 4:12, converting the soul. "The words that I speak unto you, they are spirit, and they are life." John 6:63. Hence too the reason why the man of sin, whose domain is like the valley of dry bones in Ezekiel’s vision, Ezekiel 37:1-10, is opposed to giving Scripture free course among his people. If he should, it would cause a shaking among those bones, clothe them with sinews and flesh, and the Spirit whose breath it is would breathe into them spiritual life, and they would stand up for God an exceeding great army. Thus would God consume popery with the spirit of his mouth, and destroy it with the brightness of his coming. 2 Thessalonians 2:8.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Edwards, Justin. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:17". "Family Bible New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/fam/2-timothy-3.html. American Tract Society. 1851.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

REFLECTIONS

READER! while the Apostle is thus speaking to the Church, of the perilous times that should come, may we not say with John: Little Children, it is the last time. And as we have heard that Antichrist shall come, even now are there many Antichrists; whereby we know that, it is the last time. But, Reader! who can hear what the beloved Apostle hath added to this solemn scripture, without the most painful concern? They went out from us, but they were not of us! It is distressing enough to be told by the Spirit in prophecy, that the Church shall be assaulted by heresies, in the latter day dispensation; and that we are of those latter ages in which those heresies appear, but to be told, that even in the Churches, where the truth as it is in Jesus is professed, men shall arise speaking perverse things to draw away disciples after them; these are trembling dispensations indeed. But, Reader! do not overlook the security of the faithful. That unction from the Holy One, which all truly regenerated children of God in Christ possess, teacheth all things, and will keep the Lord's people; and the wicked one shall touch them not. This is our promise. And blessed promise it is, in this present evil day.

And shall not you and I bless God the Spirit both for the information, and the means of security? Do we not behold in this chapter, sufficient marks of character, for discerning the signs of the times, to judge faithful servants of the Lord, from time-pleasers? Where we behold men lovers of their ownselves, proud, boasters, and the like; and a leanness of soul among the people, who are content with the form of godliness, but deny, and are ignorant of the power thereof: and when we contrast such a state, with that which Paul describes of himself, (and which more or less must distinguish all like Paul), whose doctrine and manner of life cannot but beget hatred, evil speaking and persecution; from all Pharisees, and mere nominal Professors of religion; are not the different characters as clearly defined, as if drawn by a sun-beam? Blessed be God the Holy Ghost, for his gracious foretelling of those perilous times; and for his divine teaching of his people to try the spirits, and to discern them. Reader! let us be waiting at wisdom's gate, in these awful days of heresy. And let us behold and see, how evil men, and seducers, among Pharisees, and mere Professors, wax worse and worse; more wretched, more lean of soul, deceiving men like themselves, not God's people, and being themselves deceived. And let those holy scriptures of our God, which are profitable for all things to the man of God, be daily in our hand, while God the Spirit is instructing our heart; that we may be found of that happy number, made strong by grace, in the faith which is in Christ Jesus.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:17". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/2-timothy-3.html. 1828.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘That the man of God may be complete, furnished completely unto every good work.’

And the result is that the man of God (a description used of the prophets in the Old Testament, and having in mind therefore Spirit inspired men) who fully responds to the Scriptures and what is written in them, will become a complete servant of God, completely furnished to every good work. The Scriptures are basically all that he requires in order to be furnished with the truth. Thus through careful study of the Scriptures the purpose of 2 Timothy 2:19-21, to be ‘prepared unto every good work’ will have been accomplished. It is not enough just to be purged from false teaching, we must be grounded in the truth. Note here the interesting point that it is not enough just to be Spirit inspired (a man of God). If such a man is to be seen as teaching the truth he must do so according to the Scriptures.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Pett, Peter. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:17". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/2-timothy-3.html. 2013.

Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament

2 Timothy 3:17. That the man of God. This, in technical language, is the final cause of the inspiration of Scripture

the reason why God has thus made it profitable. The man of God’ is used here, as before in 1 Timothy 6:11, as a half official term, as in 1 Kings 13:1, 2 Kings 6:6; 2 Kings 6:9, to indicate the work of Timothy as a prophet and evangelist.

Perfect. In the sense of being complete at all points. The participle thoroughly furnished’ is in the Greek formed from the same root, so that the effect answers to that of the English, ‘that the man of God may be complete, completely equipped.’ The explanation which has been given of this verse refers it primarily to the work of Scripture in fitting the minister of Christ, such as was Timothy, for his appointed work. But it is obvious that the work is not limited to this, and that this is the end for which Scripture was given in relation to each individual soul. It is obvious that St. Paul refers chiefly, many would say exclusively, to the Scriptures of the Old Testament; and it may well be believed that he had no thought at the time that this letter of personal counsel and strong emotion would come under the category of the Scripture of which he thus speaks. We need not, however, limit the word to this meaning. Other ‘writings’ or Scriptures were beginning to be known as such, records of the Gospel history (1 Timothy 5:18), records of prophetic utterances (Romans 16:26; 2 Peter 1:20), some of St. Paul’s own Epistles (2 Peter 3:16). The fact that the word had gained this wider range explains St. Paul’s addition of the qualifying adjective, not ‘every Scripture’ absolutely, but ‘every God-inspired Scripture,’ as though giving a test by which that inspiration might be recognised.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Schaff, Philip. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:17". "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/scn/2-timothy-3.html. 1879-90.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

That = In order that. Greek. hina.

the man of God. See App-49.

God. App-98.

perfect = fitted. Greek. artios. Only here. App-126.

throughly furnished = equipped. See Acts 21:5. App-126.

unto. App-104.

all. works = every work.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:17". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/2-timothy-3.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

That the man of God may be perfect, throughly furnished unto all good works.

Man of God (note, 1 Timothy 6:11).

Perfect, throughly furnished - `thoroughly perfected' [ artios (Greek #739) - exeertismenos (Greek #1822)]; complete (unmutilated) in the adaptation of parts and aptitude for use: [ teleios (Greek #5046)] absolutely perfect. If the Scripture be not perfect itself, how can it make the man of God perfect? But he is perfectly accoutred out of Scripture for his work, whether as a minister (cf. 2 Timothy 4:2 with 2 Timothy 3:16) or a layman. No oral out of Scripture for his work, whether as a minister (cf. 2 Timothy 4:2 with 2 Timothy 3:16) or a layman. No oral tradition is needed.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:17". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/2-timothy-3.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(17) That the man of God may be perfect, throughly furnished unto all good works.—The “man of God” here is no official designation, but simply designates the Christian generally, who is striving, with his Master’s help, to live a life pleasing to God; and the “good works” have no special reference to the labours of Timothy and his brother presbyters, but include all those generous and self-sacrificing acts to which, in these Epistles, so many references have been made.

It was in the Holy Scriptures that the true servant of the Lord, the man of God, would find defined with clearness and precision the nature of those works the Holy Spirit was pleased to call “good.”

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:17". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/2-timothy-3.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

That the man of God may be perfect, throughly furnished unto all good works.
the man
Psalms 119:98-100; 1 Timothy 6:11
throughly furnished
or, perfected.
2:21; Nehemiah 2:18; Acts 9:36; 2 Corinthians 9:8; Ephesians 2:10; Titus 2:14; 3:1; Hebrews 10:24 Reciprocal: Deuteronomy 4:8 - GeneralDeuteronomy 33:1 - the man;  Joshua 14:6 - the man;  2 Chronicles 25:7 - a man of God;  Nehemiah 12:24 - the man;  Job 36:4 - perfect;  Psalm 102:18 - This;  Jeremiah 35:4 - a man;  Matthew 13:52 - scribe;  Mark 14:6 - a good;  Acts 20:20 - profitable;  Romans 4:23 - GeneralRomans 12:2 - good;  Romans 15:4 - whatsoever;  2 Corinthians 13:9 - even;  Philippians 3:15 - as;  1 Timothy 5:10 - good;  2 Timothy 3:10 - my;  James 1:4 - perfect and

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:17". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/2-timothy-3.html.

Commentary by J.C.Philpot on select texts of the Bible

2 Timothy 3:17

"That the man of God may be perfect, throughly furnished unto all good works." 2 Timothy 3:17

What perfection does the Holy Spirit speak of here? Certainly not perfection in the flesh; that is but a wild dream of free-will and Arminianism. But perfection here and elsewhere means a being well-established and grounded in the faith, as we find the Apostle speaking ( Hebrews 5:14), "Strong food belongs to those who are of full age" (literally, as we read in the margin, "perfect"), "even those who by reason of use have their senses exercised to discern both good and evil." Christian perfection does not then consist in perfection in the flesh, but in having arrived at maturity in the divine life, in being what I may call a Christian adult, or what the Apostle terms "a MAN in Christ."

When Paul therefore says, "Let us therefore, as many as be perfect," he means "being no more children, tossed to and fro, and carried about with every wind of doctrine," but favored with a measure of Christian wisdom and strength. It is this Christian maturity which is called in Scripture, "perfection," and it is only obtained by suffering. It is only in the furnace that the tin and dross of pharisaic righteousness is purged away; and the soul comes out of the furnace "a vessel unto honor, sanctified and fit for the Master"s use."

The Lord of life and glory was made "perfect by suffering;" and there is no other way whereby his followers are made spiritually perfect. Until a man is led into suffering, he does not know the truth in its sweetness. We are full of free-will, pride, presumption, and self-righteousness. But when the soul is baptized into suffering, it is in a measure established in the truth, strengthened in the things of God, and conformed to the image of Christ.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Philpot, Joseph Charles. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:17". Commentary by J.C.Philpot on select texts of the Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jcp/2-timothy-3.html.

Stanley Derickson - Notes on Selected Books

That the man of God may be perfect, throughly furnished unto all good works."

This is the purpose of the Word - the proper preparation of the man of God - preparing him for the GOOD WORKS that His God expects of him.

Good works has fallen into the category of bad words in recent years within many churches. Works are not the "in thing" for the run of the mill believer - he does that at his job and he comes to church to be fed and nurtured - or so goes the logic of things.

God through Paul says the Word is to prepare the believer for proper living and good works - not in the great bye and bye, but now and right now! All believers should produce good works.

I might add that good works don"t necessarily need to be within the pastor's control nor within the church, but some of the good works should benefit the church in some manner.

I might also add that church leadership should get to know their people well enough so that they know if there are good works or not in a persons life. If not there should be encouragement toward them, if there are then encouragement in them would be quite appropriate.

Many a pastor assumes that if a person is not active in the good works they want them active in that they are not doing anything.

The Holy Spirit is capable of leading the individual priest into those areas of works that He wants them in without the pastor's intermediary activities. Not to say that the pastor is not to seek works from his people as he feels lead - just that if he is turned down by someone, he should not judge the turn down to be laziness on the part of the parishioner.

Copyright Statement
Copyright 2008. Used by Permission. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopy, recording or otherwise without the prior permission of the author, except as provided by U.S.A. copyright laws. Do feel free to make copies for friends that might be interested as long as you do not make profit from the copies. This is God's work and I don't want anyone to profit from it in a material way.
Bibliographical Information
Derickson, Stanley. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:17". "Stanley Derickson - Notes on Selected Books". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sdn/2-timothy-3.html.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

17.Man of God—The Christian minister. Huther objects that Paul does not here prescribe Scripture as an instrument to use in morally forming others, but in forming one’s self. Very true. But it is for forming one’s self to be a perfect former of others. Yet while addressed to Timothy as pastor in Ephesus, it implies inclusively every man who is zealous unto all good works.

 

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:17". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/2-timothy-3.html. 1874-1909.

The Expositor's Greek Testament

2 Timothy 3:17. : perfectus, completely equipped for his work as a Man of God. would have reference to his performance of it.

: See on 1 Timothy 6:11. The Man of God has here a primary reference to the minister of the Gospel.

, . . .: see 2 Timothy 2:21; and, for this use of , 1 Peter 3:15, 2 Corinthians 2:16; 2 Corinthians 10:4, Ephesians 4:29, Hebrews 5:14 and on , Moulton and Milligan, Expositor, vii., vii. 285.

Cf. the use of , Luke 6:40, 2 Corinthians 13:11, Hebrews 13:21, 1 Peter 5:10.

 

 

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Nicol, W. Robertson, M.A., L.L.D. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:17". The Expositor's Greek Testament. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/egt/2-timothy-3.html. 1897-1910.

The Bible Study New Testament

17. So that the man. [ANTHROPOS.] This is the same idea as the Lord’s servant (2 Timothy 2:22-25). The Holy Spirit continually inspires the Scriptures, not in the sense of giving a new revelation, but in the sense of making the revealed truth a living, vital thing!

 

 

 

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Ice, Rhoderick D. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:17". "The Bible Study New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/2-timothy-3.html. College Press, Joplin, MO. 1974.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

17That the man of God may be perfect. Perfect means here a blameless person, one in whom there is nothing defective; for he asserts absolutely, that the Scripture is sufficient for perfection. Accordingly, he who is not satisfied with Scripture desires to be wiser than is either proper or desirable.

But here an objection arises. Seeing that Paul speaks of the Scriptures, which is the name given to the Old Testament, how does he say that it makes a man thoroughly perfect? for, if it be so, what was afterwards added by the apostles may be thought superfluous. I reply, so far as relates to the substance, nothing has been added; for the writings of the apostles contain nothing else than a simple and natural explanation of the Law and the Prophets, together with a manifestation of the things expressed in them. This eulogium, therefore, is not inappropriately bestowed on the Scriptures by Paul; and, seeing that its instruction is now rendered more full and clear by the addition of the Gospel, what can be said but that we ought assuredly to hope that the usefulness, of which Paul speaks, will be much more displayed, if we are willing to make trial and receive it?

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Calvin, John. "Commentary on 2 Timothy 3:17". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/2-timothy-3.html. 1840-57.