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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Daniel 11:45

"He will pitch the tents of his royal pavilion between the seas and the beautiful Holy Mountain; yet he will come to his end, and no one will help him.

Adam Clarke Commentary

He shalt plant the tabernacles - He shall make a last stand in Judea, and there shall his power be smitten.

He shall come to his end, and none shall help him - All his confederate and tributary kingdoms, states, and provinces shall desert him and leave that government to come to a shameful end.

In the interpretation of this chapter I have generally followed Bp. Newton, in his most excellent Dissertations on the Prophecies, consulting other eminent authors occasionally.

From the beginning of the chapter to the end of Daniel 11:30; all is very clear and plain, relative to the Grecian, Syrian, and Egyptian histories; from the thirty-first verse to the end, the mode of interpretation is not so satisfactory, in its application to the times since Christ. Yet possibly these alone may be intended; though the whole might be, with considerable ease, applied to the remaining part of the Syrian and Egyptian history. It is a wonderful piece of prophecy, and of great utility to the cause of Divine revelation.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Daniel 11:45". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/daniel-11.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

And he shall plant the tabernacles of his palace - The loyal tents; the military tents of himself and his court. Oriental princes, when they went forth even in war, marched in great state, with a large retinue of the officers of their court, and often with their wives and concubines, and with all the appliances of luxury. Compare the account of the invasion of Greece by Xerxes, or of the camp of Darius, as taken by Alexander the Great. The military stations of Antiochus, therefore, in this march, would be, for a time, the residence of the court, and would be distinguished for as great a degree of royal luxury as the circumstances would allow. At the same time, they would consist of tabernacles or tents, as those stations were not designed to be permanent. The meaning is, that the royal temporary residence in this expedition, and previous to the close - the end of the whole matter, that is, the death of Antiochus - would be in the mountain here referred to.

Between the seas - That is, between some seas in the “east,” or “north” - for it was by tidings from the east and north that he would be disturbed and summoned forth, Daniel 11:44. We are, therefore, most naturally to look for this place in one of those quarters. The fact was, that he had two objects in view - the one was to put down the revolt in Armenia, and the other to replenish his exhausted treasury from Persia. The former would be naturally what he would first endeavor to accomplish, for if he suffered the revolt to proceed, it might increase to such an extent that it would be impossible to subdue it. Besides, he would not be likely to go to Persia when there was a formidable insurrection in his rear, by which he might be harassed either in Persia, or on his return. It is most probable, therefore, that he would first quell the rebellion in Armenia on his way to Persia, and that the place here referred to where he would pitch his royal tent, and where he would end his days, would be some mountain where he would encamp before he reached the confines of Persia. There have been various conjectures as to the place here denoted by the phrase “between the seas,” and much speculation has been employed to determine the precise location.

Jerome renders it, “And he shall pitch his tent in Apadno between the seas” - regarding the word which our translators have rendered “his palaces” (אפדנו 'apadenô ) as a proper name denoting a place. So the Greek, ἐφαδανῷ ephadanō The Syriac renders it, “in a plain, between the sea and the mountain.” Theodoret takes it for a place near Jerusalem; Jerome says it was near Nicopolis, which was formerly called Emmaus, where the mountainous parts of Judea began to rise, and that it lay between the Dead Sea on the east, and the Mediterranean on the west, where he supposes that Anti-christ will pitch his tent; Porphyry and Calmer place it between the two rivers, the Tigris and Euphrates - the latter supposing it means “Padan of two rivers,” that is, some place in Mesopotamia; and Dr. Goodwin supposes that the British Isles are intended, “which so eminently stand ‹between the seas.‘” Prof. Stuart understands this of the Mediterranean Sea, and that the idea is, that the encampment of Antiochus was in some situation between this sea and Jerusalem, mentioned here as “the holy and beautiful mountain.”

So far as the phrase used here - “between the seas” - is concerned, there can be no difficulty. It might be applied to any place lying between two sheets of water, as the country between the Dead Sea and the Mediterranean, or the Dead Sea, and Persian Gulf; or the Caspian and Euxine Seas; or the Caspian Sea and the Persian Gulf, for there is nothing in the language to determine the exact locality. There is no reason for taking the word אפדנו 'apadenô as a proper name - the literal meaning of it being tent or tabernacle; and the simple idea in the passage is, that the transaction here referred to - the event which would close this series, and which would constitute the “end” of these affairs - would occur in some mountainous region situated between two seas or bodies of water. Any such place, so far as the meaning of the word is concerned, would correspond with this prophecy.

In the glorious holy mountain - That is, this would occur

(a) in a mountain, or in a mountainous region; and

(b) it would be a mountain to which the appellation used here - “glorious holy” - would be properly given.

The most obvious application of this phrase, it cannot be doubted, would be Jerusalem, as being the “holy mountain,” or “the mountain of holiness,” and as the place which the word “glorious” (צבי tsı̂by ) would most naturally suggest. Compare Daniel 11:16, Daniel 11:41. Bertholdt and Dereser propose a change in the text here, and understand it as signifying that “he would pitch his tent between a sea and a mountain, and would seize upon a temple (קדשׁ qôdesh ) there.” But there is no authority for so changing the text. Rosenmuller, whom Lengerke follows, renders it, “between some sea and the glorious holy mountain;” Lengerke supposes that the meaning is, that Antiochus, on his return from Egypt, and before he went to Persia, “pitched his tents in that region, somewhere along the coasts of the Mediterranean, for the purpose of chastising the Jews,” and that this is the reference here. But this, as well as the proposed reading of Dereser and Bertholdt, is a forced interpretation. Gesenius (Lexicon) supposes that the phrase means, “mount of holy beauty,” i. e., Mount Sion. There are some things which are clear, and which the honest principles of interpretation demand in this passage, such as the following:

(a) What is here stated was to occur after the rumour from the east and the north Daniel 11:44 should call forth the person here referred to on this expedition.

(b) It would not be long before his “end,” - before the close of the series, and would be connected with that; or would be the place where that would occur.

(c) It would be on some mountainous region, to which the appellation “glorious holy” might with propriety be applied.

The only question of difficulty is, whether it is necessary to interpret this of Jerusalem, or whether it may be applied to some other mountainous region where it may be supposed Antiochus “pitched his tents” on his last expedition to the East; and near the close of his life. Jerome renders this, Supermontem inclytum, et sanctum; the Greek, “on the holy mountain Sabaein” - σαβαεὶν sabaein The Syriac, “in a plain, between a sea and a mountain, and shall preserve his sanctuary.” The literal meaning of the passage may be thus expressed, “on a mountain of beauty that is holy or sacred.” The essential things are,

(a) that it would be on a mountain, or in a mountainous region;

(b) that this mountain would be celebrated or distinguished for “beauty” - צבי tsebı̂y - that is, for the beauty of its situation, or the beauty of its scenery, or the beauty of its structures - or that it should be regarded as beautiful;

(c) that it would be held as sacred or holy - קדשׁ qôdesh - that is, as sacred to religion, or regarded as a holy place, or a place of worship.

Now it is true that this language might be applied to Mount Sion, for that was a mountain; it was distinguished for beauty, or was so regarded by those who dwelt there (compare Psalm 48:2); and it was holy, as being the place where the worship of God was celebrated. But it is also true, that, so far as the language is concerned, it might be applied to any other mountain or mountainous region that was distinguished for beauty, and that was regarded as sacred, or in any way consecrated to religion. I see no objection, therefore, to the supposition, that this may be understood of some mountain or elevated spot which was held as sacred to religion, or where a temple was reared for worship, and hence, it may have referred to some mountain, in the vicinity of some temple dedicated to idol worship, where Antiochus would pitch his tent for the purpose of rapine and plunder.

Yet he shall come to his end - Evidently in the expedition referred to, and in the vicinity referred to. Though he had gone full of wrath; and though he was preparing to wreak his vengeance on the people of God; and though he had every prospect of success in the enterprise, yet he would come to an end there, or would die. This would be the end of his career, and would be at the same time the end of that series of calamities that the angel predicted. The assurance is more than once given Daniel 11:27, Daniel 11:35; that there was an “appointed” time during which these troubles would continue, or that there would be an “end” of them at the appointed time, and the design was, that when these inflictions came upon the Jews they should be permitted to comfort themselves with the assurance that they would have a termination - that is, that the institutions of religion in their land would not be utterly overthrown.

And none shall help him - None shall save his life; none shall rescue him out of his danger. That is, he would certainly die, and his plans of evil would thus be brought to a close.

The question now is, whether this can be applied to the closing scenes in the life of Antiochus Epiphanes. The materials for writing the life of Antiochus are indeed scanty, but there is little doubt as to the place and manner of his death. According to all the accounts, he received intelligence of the success of the Jewish arms under Judas Maccabeus, and the overthrow of the Syrians, at Elymais or Persepolis (2 Maccabees 9:2), in Persia; and as he was detained there by an insurrection of the people, occasioned by his robbing the celebrated Temple of Diana (Jos. Ant. b. xii. ch. 9: Section 1), in which his father, Antiochus the Great, lost his life; his vexation was almost beyond endurance. He set out on his return with a determination to make every possible effort to exterminate the Jews; but during his journey he was attacked by a disease, in which he suffered excessive pain, and was tormented by the bitterest anguish of conscience, on account of his sacrilege and other crimes. He finally died at Tabae in Paratacene, on the frontiers of Persia and Babylon, in the year 163 B. C, after a reign of eleven years. See the account of his wretched death in 2 Maccabees 9; Jos. Antiq. b. xii. ch. ix.; Section 1; Prideaux, Con. iii. pp. 272,273; Polybius in Excerpta Valesii de Virtutibus et Vitiis, xxxi., and Appian, Syriac. xlvi. 80. Now this account agrees substantially with the prediction in the passage before us in the following respects:

(a) The circumstances which called him forth. It was on account of “tidings” or rumours out of the east and north that he went on this last expedition.

(b) The place specified where the last scenes would occur, “between the seas.” Any one has only to look on a map of the Eastern hemisphere to see that the ancient Persepolis, the capital of Persia, where the rumour of the success of the Jews reached him which induced him to return, is “between the seas” - the Caspian Sea and the Persian Gulf - lying not far from midway between the two.

(c) The “glorious holy mountain,” or, as the interpretation above proposed would render it, “the mountain of beauty,” sacred to religion or to worship.

(1) the whole region was mountainous.

(2) it is not unlikely that a temple would be raised on a mountain or elevated place, for this was the almost universal custom among the ancients, and it may be assumed as not improbable, that the temple of Diana, at Elymais, or Persepolis, which Antiochus robbed, and where he “pitched his tent,” was on such a place. Such a place would be regarded as “holy,” and would be spoken of as “an ornament,” or as beautiful, for this was the language which the Hebrews were accustomed to apply to a place of worship.

I suppose, therefore, that the reference is here to the closing scene in the life of Antiochus, and that the account in the prophecy agrees in the most striking manner with the facts of history, and consequently that it is not necessary to look to any other events for a fulfillment, or to suppose that it has any secondary and ultimate reference to what would occur in far-distant years.

In view of this exposition, we may see the force of the opinion maintained by Porphyry, that this portion of the book of Daniel must have been written after the events occurred. He could not but see, as anyone can now, the surprising accuracy of the statements of the chapter, and their applicability to the events of history as they had actually occurred; and seeing this, there was but one of two courses to be taken - either to admit the inspiration of the book, or to maintain that it was written after the events. He chose the latter alternative; and, so far as can be judged from the few fragments which we have of his work in the commentary of Jerome on this book, he did it solely on the ground of the accuracy of the description. He referred to no external evidence; he adduced no historical proofs that the book was written subsequent to the events; but he maintained simply that an account so minute and exact could not have been written before the events, and that the very accuracy of the alleged predictions, and their entire agreement with history, was full demonstration that they were written after. The testimony of Porphyry, therefore, may be allowed to be a sufficient proof of the correspondence of this portion of the book of Daniel with the facts of history; and if the book was written before the age of Antiochus Epiphanes, the evidence is clear of its inspiration, for no man will seriously maintain that these historic events could be drawn out, with so much particularity of detail, by any natural skill, three hundred and seventy years before they occurred, as must have been the case if written by Daniel. Human sagacity does not extend its vision thus far into the future with the power of foretelling the fates of kingdoms, and giving in detail the lives and fortunes of individual men. Either the infidel must dispose of the testimony that Daniel lived and wrote at the time alleged, or, as an honest man, he should admit that he was inspired.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Daniel 11:45". "Barnes' Notes on the New Testament". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/daniel-11.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And he shall plant the tabernacles of his palace,.... Or "pavilion"F3אפדנו "praetorii sui", Vatablus. So Aquila in Drusius. ; the tents for his princes and generals that come with him; which shall be placed about his own, and where he will think himself safe and secure, and sure of victory. Symmachus renders the words, "the tents of his cavalry"F4 τας σκηνας του ιπποστασιου αυτου, Symm.; "papiliones equitatus sui", interpr. Hieronymo; "vel potius tentoria equilis sui, seu stabuli equorum suorum", Fuller. ; or the stables of his horses; which agrees well enough with the Turks, whole cavalry is usually very large, their armies chiefly consisting of horsemen; such he shall bring into the land of Judea, and place them as after mentioned, as if he had got the day, and had obtained a settlement. The word used has the signification of covering and clothing; hence some translate it, "the tents of his curtain"F5"Tentoria aulaei sui", Schindler, col. 108. ; tents covered with curtains or veils, such as the tents of kings, generals, and principal officers, were covered with, distinguished from others by the splendour and magnificence of them. It seems to be derived from the same root as the ephod, a curious garment wore by the high priest among the Jews; hence Saadiah interprets it here a covering figured and wrought very artificially; and it is by some rendered "the tents or tabernacles of his tunic or clothing"F6"Tentoria tunicae suae", Fuller; "tentoria hujus amietus", Cocceius, Lex. col. 57. . And it is an ingenious conjecture of a learned man of our own countryF7Fuller. Miscell. Sacr. l. 5. c. 18. So Lydius, De Re Miliari, l. 4. c. 2. p. 155, 156. , that it may refer to an ancient custom of the Roman emperors, who used before a battle to have a scarlet coat spread over their tents, or hung up upon a spear, to give notice of it, as appears from Plutarch, Isidore, and others; and so this furious enemy of the church of God is here represented as setting up his bloody flag or ensign, and preparing for battle, threatening with utter desolation and destruction. And this will be

between the seas, in the glorious holy mountain; in the mountain or mountains of the land of Israel, upon which it is certain Gog or the Turk shall come, and there he shall fall, Ezekiel 39:2, particularly the mountains about Jerusalem, and more especially Mount Zion, or Moriah, as Jacchiades; on which the temple was built formerly, and was glorious and holy on that account, and for which reason the epithets may be retained; though it will now be glorious and holy, through a glorious and holy people, the Jews, become Christian, residing and worshipping in Jerusalem; whose situation is between two seas, the Mediterranean sea to the west, and the sea of Sodom, or the Syrian or Persian sea, to the east, called the hinder and the former seas in Zechariah 14:8. Some take the word אפדנו, "Apadno", translated "palace", for the proper name of a place, Theodoret takes it to be a place near Jerusalem; and Jerom says it was near Nicopolis, which was formerly called Emmaus; where the mountainous parts of Judea begin to rise, and lay between the Dead sea on the east, and the great sea on the west, where he supposes antichrist will pitch his tent: and Porphyry, as he relates, who interprets the whole of Antiochus, places it between the two rivers Tigris and Euphrates; he says that Antiochus went on an expedition against Artaxis, king of Armenia, and, having slain many of his army, pitched his tent in the place Apadno, which is situated between two large rivers, Tigris and Euphrates; and that he afterwards went to the top of a mountain, in the province of Elymais, the further part of Persia to the east, with a design to rob the temple of Diana; but being discovered by the people was obliged to flee, and that he died with grief in Tabes, a town in Persia: and Father Calmet is of opinion that a place between those two rivers before mentioned is meant, and translates the words thus,

"he shall pitch his tents in Apadno of the two seas;'

or in Padan of two rivers, Mesopotamia, situated between the Euphrates and the Tigris, two large rivers, and justly compared with the sea, particularly for their inundations. Dr. GoodwinF8Exposition of the Revelation, part 2. p. 166.

expresses his fears that our British isles are here invaded, which so eminently stand between the seas, and which God has made the eminent seat of the church in these latter days; and his fears would seem to be too well grounded, were the Romish or western antichrist here designed; but the Turk, or the eastern antichrist, is manifestly spoken of, as appears by the context: and the reason why he is so much observed, and so many things said of him, is, because the Jews have, and will have, the greatest concern with him, their country being in his hands; and it is for their sakes chiefly that the whole of this prophecy is delivered out; however, both antichrists, the one and the other, shall come to utter destruction, as follows: "yet he shall come to his end, and none shall help him"; he shall fall upon the mountains of Israel, he and his princes, his generals, and captains, and mighty men; the whole Ottoman empire shall be destroyed, signified by the drying up of the river Euphrates, which is in his dominions, Revelation 16:12, and of the vast multitudes that shall come with him, Persia, Ethiopia, Lybia, Gomer, and Togarmah, Ezekiel 38:5 and the numerous provinces he is master of; none shall be able to help him, or save him from ruin: of the destruction of the Turk, under the name of Gog, see Ezekiel 39:1.


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Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Daniel 11:45". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/daniel-11.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

And he shall plant the tabernacles f of his palace between the seas in the glorious holy mountain; yet he shall come to his end, and none shall help him.

(f) The Romans after this reigned quietly throughout all countries, and from sea to sea, and in Judea: but at length because of their cruelty God will destroy them.

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Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Daniel 11:45". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/daniel-11.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

between the seas — the Dead Sea and the Mediterranean.

tabernacles of … palace — his palace-like military tents, such as Oriental princes travel with. See on Daniel 11:40, as to the time of Antiochus‘ attack on Judea, and his subsequent “end” at Tabes, which was caused by chagrin both at hearing that his forces under Lysias were overcome by the Jews, and at the failure of his expedition against the temple of Elymais (2 Maccabees 9:5).

holy mountain — Jerusalem and Mount Zion. The desolation of the sanctuary by Antiochus, and also the desecration of the consecrated ground round Jerusalem by the idolatrous Roman ensigns, as also by the Mohammedan mosque, and, finally, by the last Antichrist, are referred to. So the last Antichrist is to sit upon “the mount of the congregation” (Isaiah 14:13), but “shall be brought down to hell” (compare Note, see on Daniel 7:26; 2 Thessalonians 2:8).


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This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Daniel 11:45". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/daniel-11.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

None shall help him - God shall cut him off in the midst of his days. And when he destroys, who can help?

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Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Daniel 11:45". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes

on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/daniel-11.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

The angel at length concludes with the settled sway of the Romans in Asia Minor and the regions of the coast, as well as in Syria, Judea, and Persia. We have already shewn how everything here predicted is related by profane historians, and each event is well known to all who are moderately versed in the knowledge of those times. We must now notice the phrase, The Roman king should fix the tents of his palace This expression signifies not only the carrying on of the war by the Romans in the east, but their being lords of the whole of that region. When he had said they should fix their tents according to the usual practice of warfare, he might have been content with the usual method of speech, but he contrasts the word “palace” with frequent migrations, and signifies their not measuring their camp according to the usage of warfare, but their occupying a fixed station for a permanence. Why then does he speak of tents? Because Asia was not the seat of their empire; for they were careful in not attributing more dignity to any place than was expedient for themselves. For this reason the proconsuls took with them numerous attendants, to avoid the necessity of any fixed palace they had their own tents, and often remained in such temporary dwellings as they found on their road. This language of the angel — they shall fix the tents of their palace — will suit the Romans exceedingly well, because they reigned there in tranquillity after the east was subdued; and yet they had no fixed habitation, because they did not wish any place to become strong enough to rebel against them. When he says, between the seas, some think the Dead Sea intended, and the Lake of Asphalt, as opposed to the Mediterranean Sea. I do not hesitate to think the Persian Sea is intended by the angel. He does not say the Romans should become masters of all the lands lying between the two seas, but he only says they should fix the tents of their palace between the seas; and we know this to have been done when they held the dominion between the Euxine and the Persian Gulf. The extent of the sway of Mithridates is well known, for historians record twenty-two nations as subject to his power. Afterwards, on one side stood Asia Minor, which consisted of many nations, according to our statement elsewhere, and Armenia became theirs after Tigranes was conquered, while Cilicia, though only a part of a province, was a very extensive and wealthy region. It had many deserts and many stony and uncultivated mountains, while there were in Cilicia many rich cities, though it did not form a single province, like Syria and Judea, so that it is not surprising when the angel says the Romans should fix their tents between the seas, for their habitation was beyond the Mediterranean Sea. They first passed over into Sicily and then into Spain; thirdly, they began to extend their power into Greece and Asia Minor against Antiochus, and then they seized upon the whole east. On the one shore was Asia Minor and many other nations; and on the other side was the Syrian Sea, including Judea as far as the Egyptian Sea. We observe, then, the tranquillity of the Roman Empire between the seas, and yet it had no permanent seat there, because the proconsuls spent their time as foreigners in the midst of a strange country.

At length he adds, They should come to the mountain of the desire of holiness I have already expressed the reason why this prophecy was uttered; it was to prevent the novelty of these events from disturbing the minds of the pious, when they saw so barbarous and distant a nation trampling upon them, and ruling with pride, insolence, and cruelty. When, therefore, so sorrowful a spectacle was set before the eyes of the pious, they required no ordinary supports lest they should yield to the pressure of despair. The angel therefore predicts future events, to produce the acknowledgment of nothing really happening by chance; and next, to shew how all these turbulent motions throughout the world are governed by a divine power. The consolation follows, they shall come at length to their end, and no one shall bring them help This was not fulfilled immediately, for after Crassus had despoiled the temple, and had suffered in an adverse engagement against the Parthians, the Romans did not fail all at once, but their monarchy flourished even more and more under Augustus. The city was then razed to the ground by Titus, and the very name and existence of the Jewish nation all but; annihilated. Then, after this, the Romans suffered disgraceful defeats; they were east out of nearly the whole east, and compelled to treat with the Parthians, the Persians, and other nations, till their empire was entirely ruined. If we study the history of the next hundred years no nation will be found to have suffered such severe punishments as the Romans, and no monarchy was ever overthrown with greater disgrace. God then poured such fury upon that nation as to render them the gazing-stock of the world. Tim angel’s words are not in vain, their own end should soon come; after they had devastated and depopulated all lands, and penetrated and pervaded everywhere, and all the world had given themselves up to their power, then the Romans became utterly ruined and swept away. They should have gone to help them Without doubt this prophecy may be here extended to rite promulgation of the gospel; for although Christ was born about one age before the preaching of the gospel, yet he truly shone forth to the world by means of that promulgation. The angel therefore brought up his prophecy to that point of time. He now subjoins, —


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Daniel 11:45". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/daniel-11.html. 1840-57.

Scofield's Reference Notes

palace

(See Scofield "Daniel 11:2").


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These files are considered public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available in the Online Bible Software Library.

Bibliography
Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on Daniel 11:45". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/daniel-11.html. 1917.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

REFLECTIONS

PAUSE, my soul, over this Chapter, and behold in it the evidences of the Lord's tender mercies over his people. Though they were in captivity, and justly suffering punishment for their sins, yet, still the Lord hath an eye over them for good, and will not, finally cast away his people whom he foreknew. Hence they shall be told what is to happen to them, after their deliverance from Babylon. The Persian, and the Grecian, and the Roman government, are shown to be in succession to each other, and all to make way for Christ. And no doubt, He that brought the Prophet acquainted with the events which were to come to pass, gave him also an assurance of the Church's redemption in Jesus, with all the blessings that were to follow, by reason of Christ's coming.

Reader! and shall not you and I find confidence in the whole of God's promises in Christ, to look still forward, with the most pleasing faith, for the accomplishment of all yet remaining to be fulfilled, in the person, work, and righteousness, of God our Saviour? Did Daniel thus receive knowledge in the events to come concerning the Church; and is the interests of the Church less dear to Christ now? Have not we lived to see all things accomplished, which were here foretold; and are not all these so many additional testimonies to the truth, as it is in Jesus? Hail holy, blessed, Almighty Lord give to both Writer and Reader, grace, to wait in full assurance of faith, for all the events connected with thy second coming. And oh! grant, that that faith, may be so lively, in all its actings upon thee, that when thou shalt appear we may have confidence, and not be ashamed before thee, at thy coming.


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Bibliography
Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Daniel 11:45". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/daniel-11.html. 1828.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Daniel 11:45 And he shall plant the tabernacles of his palace between the seas in the glorious holy mountain; yet he shall come to his end, and none shall help him.

Ver. 45. And he shall plant the tabernacles of his palace,] i.e., He shall pitch his tent-royal (in token of full power given to his captains Lysias and the rest) in Emmaus, near to Jerusalem, to keep the Jews in subjection. [1 Maccabees 3:40; 1 Maccabees 4:3]

Between the seas.] The Dead Sea and the Medditerranean Sea, which are the bounds of Judea, called here the glorious holy mountain. (a)

Yet he shall come to his end.] A loathsome and lamentable one. See 1 Maccabees 6:8, 2 Maccabees 9:5-12 not so much because he would have spoiled the temple of Diana, but because he did spoil the temple at Jerusalem.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Daniel 11:45". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/daniel-11.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Between the seas; the Euxine and Mediterranean. at Constantinople, and even to the Red Sea;

in the glorious holy mountain, in the church of Christ eastern: so the Turk. Or in the western seas, the Mediterranean and Adriatic: so the pope, reaching to the western ocean. Both antichrists, one without, and the other within the temple of God.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Daniel 11:45". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/daniel-11.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

45. R.V., “And he shall plant the tents of his palace between the seas and [margin, at] the glorious holy mountain; yet he shall come to his end and none shall help him.” He shall pitch his headquarters near to Jerusalem between the Mediterranean and Mount Zion, and work an awful destruction upon the holy people (see notes Daniel 11:31-36); but his own “end” is near and no heavenly help will come to him such as is offered to the persecuted Israelites (Daniel 10:21; Daniel 12:1). The tragic circumstances connected with the death of Antiochus are perhaps exaggerated in the Jewish writings, but at the best it was a death of dishonor following several years of disappointment, poverty, and failure. There are many opinions as to the meaning of the sea (or, seas) near to which Antiochus pitched his palace tents. Meinhold, for example, thinks these were the Euphrates and Tigris, between which Antiochus camped after his victory over the Armenians; but the above explanation seems best to us. The “holy mount,” as used in Scripture, seems always to refer to the temple mountain. We do not agree with Terry that this verse clearly implies that Antiochus came to “his end” in his Palestine camp. (Compare note Daniel 11:44.) The very form of apocalyptic composition forbids any such insistency upon the customary prosaic unities of time and place.

His end — This is simply the repetition of a refrain which has been repeated again and again (Daniel 11:27; Daniel 11:35-40).

The “end of the indignation” is closely connected with the end of the little horn, and wherever the one has been promised the other has been threatened. Beyond this “end” of persecution — as beyond the “end” which Jeremiah saw at the close of the seventy years captivity-there lies another period of struggle dimly seen and then everlasting victory!


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Daniel 11:45". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/daniel-11.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Apadno. Some take it for the proper name of a place; others, from the Hebrew translate it, his palace. (Challoner) --- He fixed his royal tent between the Mediterranean and the Dead Sea. (Worthington) ---Porphyrius explains this of the march beyond the Euphrates, which St. Jerome does not disapprove. Apadno may denote Mesopotamia, which is styled Padan Aram. --- Glorious. Hebrew: Zebi, (Calmet) or Tsebi, (Haydock) may allude to Mount Taba, where the king perished, without help. (1 Machabees vi. 11. and 2 Machabees ix. 9.) St. Jerome and many others explain all this of antichrist, and no doubt he was prefigured. The like events will probably take place again towards the end of the world. But as the particulars cannot be ascertained, we have adhered to the history of Antiochus. (Calmet)


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Daniel 11:45". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/daniel-11.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

plant = spread out.

tabernacles, &c. = palatial tent.

come to his end. This could not be said of Antiochus, for he died at Tabae, in Persia. "The wilful king" comes to his end in Judea, between Jerusalem and the Mediterranean Sea.

and none shall help him. For he is smitten by God Himself. See Isaiah 11:4. Zech 12 and Zech 14; 2 Thessalonians 2:8. Revelation 19:20. The grave does not receive him (for Isaiah 14:19 is only a comparison "like"), and he is not joined with them in burial. He is cast into the lake of fire.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Daniel 11:45". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/daniel-11.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And he shall plant the tabernacles of his palace between the seas in the glorious holy mountain; yet he shall come to his end, and none shall help him.

And he shall plant the tabernacles of his palace between the seas in the glorious holy mountain. Then he turned to check Artaxias, king of Armenia. He died in the Persian town Tabes, 164 BC, as both Polybius and Porphyry agree. Doubtless antitypically, the final Antichrist, and his predecessor Mohammed, are intended, to whom the language may be more fully applicable than to Antiochus the type.

He shall plant the tabernacles of his palace between the seas - between the Dead Sea and the Mediterranean.

Tabernacles of ... palace - his palace-like military tents, such as Oriental princes travel with. See note, Daniel 11:40, as to the time of Antiochus' attack on Judea, and his subsequent "end" at Tabes, which was caused by the visitation of God during his chagrin both at hearing that his forces under Lysias were overcome by the Jews, and at the failure of his expedition against the temple of Elymais (2 Maccabees 9:5, 'The Lord Almighty, the God of Israel, smote him with an incurable and invisible plague; for as soon as he had spoken thee words (that he would make Jerusalem a common burying place of the Jews), a pain of the bowels, that was remediless, came upon him, and sore torments in the inner parts: and that most justly, because he had tormented other men's bowels with many and strange torments'). In the glorious holy mountain - Jerusalem and mount Sion. The desolation of the sanctuary by Antiochus, and also the desecration of the consecrated ground round Jerusalem by the idolatrous Roman ensigns, as also by the Mohammedan mosque, and, finally, by the last Antichrist, is referred to. So the last Antichrist is to sit upon "the mount of the congregation" (Isaiah 14:13), but "shall be brought down to hell" (cf. note, Daniel 7:26; 2 Thessalonians 2:8).

Remarks:

(1) This chapter foretells, in most minute detail, the successive histories of Xerxes of Persia; Alexander the Great, king of Macedon and conqueror of Persia; the four-fold division of Alexander's kingdom at his death, and the consequent conflicts between the kings of the north and the kings of the south, the Seleucidae and the Ptolemies; and, lastly, the proud violence of Antiochus Epiphanes against the covenant-people of God, and his final doom. The details are given with such minuteness beforehand, in order to strengthen and support the faithful ones among God's ancient people, in the fiery ordeal through which they were about to pass, during the long period when they were to be without any living prophets. If the world-powers were about to permitted to trample under foot the people of the covenant, the latter would take comfort in knowing that their God had told them of it "in the Scripture of truth" (Daniel 10:21) long before: and had also engaged that, though the trial under Antiochus, the Old Testament Antichrist, was be most severe, yet it was to be of short duration, and he was to come to his end, and none should help him (Daniel 11:45).

(2) Never was the transitoriness of earthly greatness more strikingly shown than in the case of Xerxes king of Persia, who was "far richer than all" his royal predecessors, and who "by his strength through his riches stirred up all against the realm of Grecia" (Daniel 11:2). After having gathered land and sea forces to the number of 2,600,041 men out of his vast empire, he invaded Greece. But how differently he returned, humbled and defeated, only eight months after he had left Asia full of pride and confident of victory! Worldly pomp, power, and riches soon pass away, and do not even give solid satisfaction to their possessor while he has them. Lot us seek the true riches, which are imperishable and all-satisfying, and we shall never be disappointed.

(3) Alexander the Great, by conquest, obtained the vast dominion once held by the Persian king, and for his brief span of life "did according to his will" (Daniel 11:3). Unlikely as it would have seemed to mere human foresight that such a completely-established dominion should fall to pieces, God so ordered it, and the Scriptures of truth foretold it: therefore so it was, at his death his empire no longer continued one united whole, but, as Daniel foretold ages before, it was "divided toward the four winds of heaven, and not to his posterity, nor according to his dominion which he ruled" (Daniel 11:4). Thus God in His providence puts down one and sets up another, according to His sovereign pleasure. The kingdom is the Lord's; and while we give honour to them to whom honour is due, let us never forget there is One above who is infinitely higher than they, and to whom our highest allegiance is due.

(4) The tangled web of earthly politics is full of intrigues, ambition, selfishness, violence, and treachery (Daniel 11:15-29). How little are the objects to be coveted which are attained only by such means! History tells of many instances of kings whose hearts were set on doing mischief to one another, under the mask of cordiality, speaking lies at one table. But lies are sure in the end not to prosper (Daniel 11:2). Yet God all the while overrules the schemes and workings of those men who "exalt themselves, to establish" His own purpose, in spite of themselves (Daniel 11:14). The conflicts and plots between the kings of Syria in the north and the kings of Egypt in the south are singled out for special description, because holy Scripture handles secular history only in so far as it bears upon the interests of Israel, the covenant-people, and His Church. Judea, as lying between Syria and Egypt, necessarily was affected seriously by the struggle between the kings of those two countries. Let us similarly view the politics of nations, chiefly as they affect the interests of the kingdom of God and the people of God; because these latter alone are abiding: all things else are of secondary importance, inasmuch as they are rapidly passing away. (5) The career of Antiochus Epiphanes, in his persecution of the people of God and blasphemous enmity against Yahweh and His sanctuary, is described in language which evidently is not exhausted by the incidents of his history, but is designed in the fullest sense to describe the last Antichrist, of whom Antiochus was the Old Testament forerunner. The adoption of the so-called refinements and usages of the ungodly world, and a growing indifference to the exclusive and paramount claims of the only true God, on the part of those Jews who "forsook the holy covenant" (Daniel 11:30), were the first insidious steps toward preparing the way for the open blasphemies of Antiochus. So it shall be in the last days. A false liberalism, which reduces all religion to a mere matter of individual opinion, as though no one creed were revealed by God as the absolute truth to be believed and obeyed exclusively, combined with a growing laxity of practice and an exaggerated exaltation of art and human science and invention, as if man were now almost independent of God and constituted the judge of revelation, are symptoms, already being manifested, that we are verging toward those coming last days of anti-Christian apostasy.

(6) No world-ruler before Antiochus had ever of set purpose and continuously interfered with the religion of the people of God. This was a new peril that then first threatened the very existence of the worship of God on earth. Hence, arose the need of such a detailed prophecy of it before the event. So accurate and full is the correspondence between the prophecy and the events, that Porphyry, the opponent of revelation, feeling it impossible to deny the correspondence, was driven to the expedient of maintaining, from the accuracy, that the prophecy must have been written subsequently to the event. But the Jews, as being the enemies of Christianity, are unanswerable witnesses for the reality of the book as a prophecy before the event: for, if they could, they would gladly deny the genuineness and authenticity of Daniel, who, in the ninth chapter, plainly supports the Christian view as to Messiah's death: but they do not deny, but maintain the book to be what it professes to be, a genuine prophecy of events which Daniel foretold by the Spirit of God.

Therefore Porphyry's view in which man modern rationalists share, is utterly untenable. What a comfort to the faithful few among the Jews in the days of Antiochus it must have been to know that, though many of the Jews forsook and did wickedly against the covenant (Daniel 11:30; Daniel 11:32), Messiah would ere long come to "confirm the covenant" (Daniel 9:27): and though Antiochus polluted the sanctuary and took away the daily sacrifice (Daniel 11:31), Messiah would "cause the sacrifice and the oblation to cease," and the sanctuary subsequently to be destroyed (Daniel 9:27); and yet that He would "make an evil of sins, and bring in everlasting righteousness" (Daniel 11:24); so that they would perceive that after all a material temple and legal sacrifices were not so absolutely necessary to salvation as they had thought them heretofore! God can provide his people with spiritual comforts in the worst of times; therefore let us never cast away our hope and confidence in Him.

(7) "The abomination of desolation, or idol to be set up by the desolater in the sanctuary of God, was, in accordance with the prophecy, first set up by Antiochus in the temple of Yahweh; next by the Romans under Titus; next by the apostate Church of Rome in the spiritual temple; then by the Mohammedans, who have had their Mosque of Omar on the site of the temple for ages: and the last crowning fulfillment shall be when the personal Antichrist shall set up his image (Revelation 13:1-18) for worship in the restored temple at Jerusalem.

Thus from age to age Scripture is ever receiving successive fulfillments of its pregnant and wide-reaching predictions, and of its everlasting principles of truth. Persecution is permitted for the probation of men's character. Those of spiritual understanding, when they are afflicted, shall have their dross purged away thereby (Daniel 11:33; Daniel 11:35), and shall be the instruments in God's hands of instructing and confirming many in all ages. Though even they should fall for a time, they shall not be utterly cast down: and when raised by the grace of God again, they are taught the lesson of humility and distrust of themselves, meekness toward others who fall, and love to Him who has so lovingly restored them. God will not allow His people to be tried beyond a fixed limit; and the duty of the godly is to wait patiently for "the time of the end" which God has "appointed" (Daniel 11:35). The Antichrist who is coming will not regard Messiah, "the desire of all nations" (Haggai 2:7), and the desire of Jewish mothers (Daniel 11:37) in all ages.

As the Jews would not receive the true Messiah; who came in His Father's name, they shall be given over to a judicial delusion, so as to receive the false Messiah who shall come in his own name (John 5:43); so shall the indignation of God against the Jews, for their wicked blindness, be accomplished (Daniel 11:36). But after Antichrist has reached the summit of his blasphemous ambition, and "planted the tabernacles of his palace between the seas in the glorious holy mountain" (Daniel 11:45), and when the covenant-people shall be at their lowest point of depression, then shall the Lord Himself manifestly interpose in their behalf (Zechariah 12:1-14; Zechariah 14:1-21), and Antichrist "shall come to his end, and none shall help him." Let us be warned by the case of the Jews not to be high-minded, but to fear. Our only safety in the coming times of apostasy, as indeed in the present times, when its Antichristian elements are already working, is prayerfully and watchfully to keep fast hold of "the Scripture of truth" (Daniel 10:21), and ever to look to the Spirit of Truth to guide us into all truth, both of doctrine and of practice.


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Daniel 11:45". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/daniel-11.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(45) He shall plant . . .—For a similar prophecy, comp. Jeremiah 43:10 (where see the Targum). The king is here represented as halting while a palatial tent is being erected for him. The word “palace” is omitted by the LXX., and simply transliterated “Apedno” by St. Jerome and Theodotion, as if it were a proper name.

Between the seas—i.e., between the Mediterranean and the Dead Sea.

The glorious holy mountain.—Literally, The mountain of the holy ornament, generally explained to be Mount Zion. (Comp. Psalms 48:2.) This he threatens, as once did the Assyrian (comp. Isaiah 10:32-34), but without success.

He shall come to his end.—It is to be remarked that the end of this king is placed in the same locality which is elsewhere predicted by the prophets as the scene of the overthrow of Antichrist (Ezekiel 39:4; Joel 3:2; Joel 3:12; Zechariah 14:2).


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Daniel 11:45". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/daniel-11.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And he shall plant the tabernacles of his palace between the seas in the glorious holy mountain; yet he shall come to his end, and none shall help him.
between
Joel 2:20; Zechariah 14:8
in the
16,41; Psalms 48:2; Isaiah 2:2; 14:13; Micah 4:2; 2 Thessalonians 2:4
glorious holy mountain
or, goodly. Heb. mountain of delight of holiness. he shall come.
2:35; 7:26; 8:25; Ezekiel 38:22,23; 39:2; 2 Thessalonians 2:8; Revelation 13:10; 14:14-20; Revelation 19:19-21; 20:2,9

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Daniel 11:45". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/daniel-11.html.

Arthur Peake's Commentary on the Bible

Daniel 11:45. between the sea and . . . mountain: the prophecy supposes that Antiochus will die in Palestine somewhere between the Mediterranean and Mt. Zion. As a matter of fact, he actually died at Tabs in Persia.


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Bibliography
Peake, Arthur. "Commentary on Daniel 11:45". "Arthur Peake's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pfc/daniel-11.html. 1919.


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