corner graphic   Hi,    
ver. 2.0.20.10.30
Finding the new version too difficult to understand? Go to classic.studylight.org/

Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Daniel 8:13

Then I heard a holy one speaking, and another holy one said to that particular one who was speaking, "How long will the vision about the regular sacrifice apply, while the transgression causes horror, so as to allow both the holy place and the host to be trampled?"


Adam Clarke Commentary

One saint speaking, and another saint said - One angel asked another how long the sanctuary was to be trodden down?


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Daniel 8:13". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/daniel-8.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Then I heard one saint speaking - One holy one. The vision was now ended, and the prophet represents himself now as hearing earnest inquiries as to the length of time during which this desolation was to continue. This conversation, or these inquiries, he represents himself as hearing among those whom he calls “saints” - or holy ones - קדשׁ qâdôsh This word might refer to a saint on earth, or to an angel - to any holy being. As one of these, however, was able to explain the vision, and to tell how long the desolation was to continue, it is more natural to refer it to angels. So Lengerke understands it. The representation is, that one holy one, or angel, was heard by Daniel speaking on this subject, but nothing is recorded of what he said. It is implied only that he was conversing about the desolations that were to come upon the holy city and the people of God. To him thus speaking, and who is introduced as having power to explain it, another holy one approaches, and asks how long this state of things was to continue. The answer to this question Daniel 8:14 is made, not to the one who made the inquiry, but to Daniel, evidently that it might be recorded. Daniel does not say where this vision occurred - whether in heaven or on earth. It was so near to him, however, that he could hear what was said.

And another saint - Another holy one - probably an angel. If so, we may conclude, what is in itself every way probable, that one angel has more knowledge than another, or that things are communicated to some which are not to others.

Unto that certain saint which spake - Margin, Palmoni, or, the numberer of secrets, or, the wondeful numberer. The Hebrew word, פלמוני palemônı̂y occurs nowhere else in the Scriptures. The similar form, פלני pelonı̂y occurs in Rth 4:1 , “Ho, such a one, turn aside;” in 1 Samuel 21:2, “appointed my servants to such and such a place;” and 2 Kings 6:8, “In such and such a place.” The Italic words denote the corresponding Hebrew word. The word, according to Gesenius, means some one, a certain one; in Arabic, one who is distinct or definite, whom one points out as with the finger, and not by name. It is derived from an obsolete noun, פלון pâlôn from the verb פלה pâlâh to distinguish, and is united commonly with the word אלמני 'alemonı̂y - meaning, properly, one concealed or unknown. It is language, therefore, which would be properly addressed to an unknown person with whom we would desire to speak, or whom we would designate by the finger, or in some such way, without being able to call the name. Thus applied in the passage here, it means that Daniel did not know the names of the persons thus speaking, but simply saw that one was speaking to another. He had no other way of designating or distinguishing them than by applying a term which was commonly used of a stranger when one wished to address him, or to point him out, or to call him to him. There is no foundation in the word for the meaning suggested in the margin. Theodotion does not attempt to translate the word, but retains it - φελμουνὶ phelmouni - Phelmouni. The Latin Vulgate well expresses the meaning, dixit unus sanctus alteri nescio loquenti. The full sense is undoubtedly conveyed by the two ideas,

(a) that the one referred to was unknown by name, and

(b) that he wished to designate him in some way, or to point him out.

How long shall be the vision concerning the daily sacrifice? - How long is what is designed to be represented by the vision to continue; that is, how long in fact will the offering of the daily sacrifice in the temple be suspended?

And the transgression of desolation - Margin, making desolate. That is, the act of iniquity on the part of Antiochus producing such desolation in the holy city and the temple - show long is that to continue?

To give both the sanctuary - The temple; the holy place where God dwelt by a visible symbol, and where he was worshipped.

And the host - The people of God - the Jewish people.

To be trodden under foot - To be utterly despised and prostrated - as anything which is trodden under our feet.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Daniel 8:13". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/daniel-8.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Then I heard one saint speaking,.... An angel, either a created angel, pure and holy in his nature, as Gabriel; or the uncreated Angel Jesus Christ, the Word of God; what he was speaking of is not said; perhaps Daniel did not hear what he said, though he heard him speaking, or perceived that he spake; yet did not understand what he said, or what was the subject of his discourse; very probably it was something relative to the vision now seen:

and another saint said unto that certain saint that spake; another angel said to him that spake, whose name is unknown, only called such an one, or Palmoni, which some render "the wonderful numberer"; or, "the numberer of secrets", or "that has all secrets numbered"F7לפלמוני "illi qui occulta in numerato habet", Junius & Tremellius. ; and apply it to Christ, whose name is "Pele", wonderful; the eternal Word of God, that is in the bosom of the Father, and knows all secrets, and the number of times and seasons, how long they will last; what created angels know not, he does; and therefore they apply to him for instruction and knowledge in hidden things:

how long shall be the vision concerning the daily sacrifice, and the transgression of desolation, to give both the sanctuary and the host to be trodden underfoot? that is, how long will this vision last? or when will this prophecy be at an end, and have its full and final accomplishment? how long will the sacrifice be taken away, or made to cease? how long will that transgression, that abomination, making the temple desolate, the image of Jupiter Olympius set up by Antiochus, continue in it? how long shall it be given to him, or he be permitted to tread under foot, and use in the most contemptuous manner, the temple of the Lord, and his people?


Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Daniel 8:13". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/daniel-8.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

Then I heard one u saint speaking, and another saint said unto that certain [saint] which spake, How long [shall be] the vision [concerning] the daily [sacrifice], and the transgression of x desolation, to give both the sanctuary and the y host to be trodden under foot?

(u) Meaning that he heard one of the angels asking this question of Christ, whom he called a certain one, or a secret one, or a marvellous one.

(x) That is, the Jews' sins, which were the cause of its destruction.

(y) That is, which suppresses God's religion and his people.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Daniel 8:13". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/daniel-8.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

that certain saint — Daniel did not know the names of these two holy angels, but saw only that one was speaking to the other.

How long shall be the vision concerning … daily sacrifice — How long shall the daily sacrifice be suspended?

transgression of desolation — literally, “making desolate,” that is, Antiochus desolating profanation of the temple (Daniel 11:31; Daniel 12:11). Compare as to Rome and the last Antichrist, Matthew 24:15.


Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Daniel 8:13". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/daniel-8.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Then I heard one saint speaking, and another saint said unto that certain saint which spake, How long shall be the vision concerning the daily sacrifice, and the transgression of desolation, to give both the sanctuary and the host to be trodden under foot?

One saint — That is, one holy angel.

How long — How long shall Antiochus continue his vexations against the people and prevent the worship of God? This is, the treading down of the sanctuary, and the host.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Daniel 8:13". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/daniel-8.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

Here he expresses more clearly, what I formerly said, unfolding God’s intention of consoling and soothing the sorrows of the pious lest they should sink under the severity of their trials, at the sight of an impious tyrant domineering in the sanctuary of God. Besides, the spot which God had promised should be his perpetual dwelling-place, was exposed to impious superstitions, for the idol of Jupiter Olympius was erected there, the history of the Maccabees informs us. (2 Maccabees 1:57; 2 Maccabees 6:2.) God therefore wished to uphold his servants, lest too severe a temptation should overwhelm them, and lest trial in so many forms should cause them to yield and become deficient in piety through want of courage. But while Daniel is stupefied through astonishment, God provides for his infirmity by means of an angel. Daniel himself, without doubt, inquired concerning the vision as we shall see he did afterwards; but here God desired to meet him, as he saw the holy man so overcome by fear as scarcely to dare to make any inquiry. God, therefore, here affords no common proof of his paternal goodness and indulgence, in interposing and sending his angel to make inquiries in the Prophet’s name. He says, then, he heard a holy one, meaning an angel. For, although God deigns to call the faithful while dwelling in the world by this honorable title, yet the superior purity of angels is familiar to us, as they are altogether free from the lusts of the flesh. But we, alas! are detained in this prison-house, we are bound down in slavery to sin, and are polluted by much corruption. The holiness of angels, however, is far greater than that of mortals, and thus this attribute of “holiness” is properly applied to them. When Daniel was caught up by the prophetic spirit, he was separated from the society of men, and was admitted to that of angels.

An angel then, said to the wonderful one The Hebrews often use this expression when they mean “whoever it may be” — ploni almoni and apply it to places as well as persons. They use it also of any place unknown to them or concealed from them. They treat the noun as compounded of two words, and many interpret it of any one unknown, but I think the word to be more emphatic than this. (62) Daniel here brings forward an angel speaking, and adds dignity to his description by calling him “holy.” Without doubt, then, the person of whom the angel asked the question was his superior; it is not likely that he would be called “a certain one,” while the angel is termed a holy one. Reason, then, requires the expression to be applied to some angel whose glory was incomprehensible, or at least far superior to ordinary ones; for, as Daniel calls one angel “holy,” so he would have called the rest, as we shall afterwards see. When treating, however, of a distinct being, he uses the word פלמוני, palmoni, and its etymology guides us to its sense, as meaning something mysterious and incomprehensible. Then, who does not see that Christ is denoted, who is the chief of angels and far superior to them all? In the ninth chapter of Isaiah, (Isaiah 9:6,) he is called פלא pela, “wonderful.” The word in the text is a compound one, as we have said, but as פלא pela, signifies “hidden” in Hebrew, as Christ is so called, and as in Jude 3:1, God claims this name as peculiarly his own, all these points agree well together. The sense then is, an angel comes to Christ for the sake of Daniel and of the whole Church, and seeks from him as from the supreme teacher and master, the meaning of the declarations which we have just heard. We need not feel surprise at angels inquiring into eternity, as if it were unknown to them. It is the property of Deity alone to know all things, while the knowledge of angels is necessarily limited. Paul teaches us to wonder at the Church being collected out of profane and strange people; this was a mystery hidden from angels themselves, before God really showed himself the father of the whole world. (Ephesians 3:10.) Hence, there is no absurdity in supposing angels to inquire into mysteries, as ignorance is not necessarily deserving of blame, and as God has not raised his creatures for his own level. It is his peculiar province to know all things, and to have everything under his eye. The angel desires to understand this mystery, not so much for his own sake as on account of the whole Church; for we know them to be our ministers, according to the clear testimony of the Apostle. (Hebrews 1:14.) As they keep watch over us so carefully, it does not surprise us to find the angel inquiring so anxiously concerning this vision, and thus benefiting the whole Church by the hand of Daniel.

Meanwhile, we must notice, how Christ is the chief of angels and also their instructor, because he is the eternal Wisdom of God. Angels, therefore, must draw all the light of their intelligence from that single fountain. Thus angels draw us to Christ by their example, and induce us to devote ourselves to him through the persuasion that this is the supreme and only wisdom. If we are his disciples, being obedient, humble, and teachable, we shall desire to know only what he will make manifest to us. But the angel asks. What is the meaning of the vision of the perpetual sacrifice, and of the sin? that is, what, is the object of the vision concerning the abrogation of the perpetual sacrifice, and concerning the sin which lays waste? As to the second point, we explained yesterday the various opinions of interpreters, some twisting it to Antiochus, who impiously dared to violate God’s temple, and others to the priests. But we said the people were intended, lest many, as they are accustomed, should blame the Almighty for so heavily afflicting the Church. But God wished to bear witness to the origin of this devastation from the sins of the people. It is just as if the angel had said, How long will the sacrifices cease? How long will this vengeance, by which God will chastise the wickedness of his people, endure? For the sin is called devastating, through being the cause of that calamity. It is afterwards added, how long will the sanctuary and the army be trodden, down? that is, how long will the worship of God, and true piety, and the people itself, be trodden down under this cruel tyranny of Antiochus? But this question has far more efficacy, than if the Prophet had said, as we saw yesterday, that the punishment should be uniform and temporal. It was now necessary to explain what had already been stated more clearly. Thus this question was interposed with the view of rendering Daniel more attentive, and of stirring up the people by this narrative to the pursuit of learning. For it is no common event when angels approach Christ for our sakes, and inquire into the events which concern the state and safety of the Church. As, therefore, angels discharge this duty, we must be worse than stony, if we are not urged to eagerness and carefulness in the pursuit of divine knowledge. We see, then, why this passage concerning the angel is interposed.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.

Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Daniel 8:13". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/daniel-8.html. 1840-57.

Scofield's Reference Notes

desolation

Seven times in Daniel the "desolation" is spoken of:

(1) Of the sanctuary, Daniel 8:13 fulfilled by Antiochus Epiphanes, B.C. 175-170.

(2) Of the sanctuary, Daniel 9:17 the condition in Daniel's time, when the Jews were in exile and the sanctuary desolate.

(3) Generally, of the land, Daniel 9:18 also referring to Daniel's time.

(4) Of the sanctuary, Daniel 9:26 fulfilled A.D. 70, in the destruction of city and temple after the cutting off of Messiah. Luke 21:20.

(5,6,7) Of the sanctuary, by the Beast, Daniel 9:27; Daniel 11:31; Daniel 12:11 Cf; Matthew 24:15; Mark 13:14; 2 Thessalonians 2:3; 2 Thessalonians 2:8-12; Revelation 13:14; Revelation 13:15.

one saint Or, holy one, idem. Daniel 4:13; Daniel 4:17.


Copyright Statement
These files are considered public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available in the Online Bible Software Library.

Bibliography
Scofield, C. I. "Scofield Reference Notes on Daniel 8:13". "Scofield Reference Notes (1917 Edition)". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/srn/daniel-8.html. 1917.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Daniel 8:13 Then I heard one saint speaking, and another saint said unto that certain [saint] which spake, How long [shall be] the vision [concerning] the daily [sacrifice], and the transgression of desolation, to give both the sanctuary and the host to be trodden under foot?

Ver. 13. And I heard one saint speaking,] i.e., One holy angel; for they are solicitous of God’s glory, and sensitive to the saints’ sufferings, whereof they would have a speedy end. And should not we be so too, weeping with those that weep, and rejoicing with those that rejoice?

And another saint said unto that certain saint which spake.] Anonymo illi qui loquebatur, so Piscator rendereth it; others, To the wonderful numberer who spake - i.e., who commanded Gabriel to declare the vision to Daniel. [Daniel 8:16] This was Jesus Christ, the Wisdom and Word of God. He who knoweth all the secrets of his Father as perfectly as if they were numbered before him.

How long shall be the vision.] It appeareth, then, that angels know not all secrets, but that their knowledge is limited; they know not so much, but they would know more. [Ephesians 3:10 1 Peter 1:12]

Concerning the daily sacrifice.] The loss whereof was a just matter of lamentation to godly minds. See Zephaniah 3:18.

And the transgression of desolation.] Transgression is a land desolating evil. [Lamentations 1:9]

And the host to be trodden under foot,] i.e., The professors of the truth were overturned; some by persuasion, others by persecution.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Daniel 8:13". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/daniel-8.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Daniel 8:13. How long shall be the vision concerning, &c.— There is no word for concerning in this verse, which may be rendered more properly, For how long time shall the vision last, the daily sacrifice be taken away, and the transgression of desolation continue? After the same manner the question is translated in the LXX, Arabic, and Vulgate. See Bishop Newton.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Daniel 8:13". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/daniel-8.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

By the first

saint is meant a holy angel, by the other is meant Jesus Christ,

Palmoni, a

numberer or revealer of secrets, a wonderful revealer, Isaiah 9:6. Of him the angel asks this secret concerning the calamity of the church, how long it would last, for Daniel’s sake and his people. For the Lord Christ is the Teacher of his people, the Wisdom of God, and hath all this in his power by office, and as he stands in relation to his church, and for them.

The Lord knows his suffering people are much concerned about the time of their sufferings, because there is an appointed time for it, and the Lord doth sometimes reveal it, as we see here, unto his considering ones, Daniel 8:5, and praying saints, Da 9; they cry out in their agonies, How long, O Lord? and it is an addition to their sorrow that no man knoweth how long, Psalms 74:9. How long shall Antiochus continue his tyrannical vexations against the people of God, and the worship of God? This is the

treading down of the sanctuary and the host.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Daniel 8:13". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/daniel-8.html. 1685.

Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible

‘Then I heard a holy one speaking, and another holy one said to that certain one who spoke, “How long will be the vision about the continual things (worship rites) and the transgression that appals (or makes desolate), to give both the sanctuary and the host to be trodden underfoot?” And he said to me, “To two thousand three hundred mornings and evenings. Then will the sanctuary be cleansed (made righteous).” ’

Here we have a conversation between two holy ones, or angels, in which the question is put as to how long the devastating things that are to happen will last.

We could paraphrase it as ‘how long will it take for the vision to be fulfilled, during which the continual rites will cease, and the transgression that appals takes place, and from the time when the sanctuary and God’s people are trodden under foot, to the date when the sanctuary is finally made righteous (justified)?’

The main ideas to be considered are:

1) The cessation of the continual rites of true worship. This represented the decrees by which true worship was forbidden, including the observance of the Sabbath, the offering of the morning and evening sacrifices, and the carrying out of the other regular ritual observances.

2) The transgression that appals. This could have been the active participation in worship of a high priest who was not of the recognised priestly line, the stealing of the temple vessels by that high priest, the murder of the true high priest by instigation of that high priest, or the final sacrilege of offering a pig on the altar. All these could be seen as transgressions that ‘appalled’. Compare Ezra 9:4 where he too was appalled. at the holy seed mixing in marriage with the inhabitants of the land, and Jeremiah 2:12 where God calls on the heavens to be appalled at the idolatry of God’s people.

3) The treading under foot of the sanctuary and God’s people. This occurred the moment that Menelaus was appointed and took up office. The sanctity of the sanctuary and the concerns of the people were both trodden under foot. And this then continued in what followed.

4) The date when the temple is finally ‘made righteous’. This may have been the time when the temple was purified, or it may have been seen as only accomplished when the defiler had died. It may thus refer to the date of Antiochus’ death.

The reply to the question is then, for two thousand three hundred mornings and evenings, after which the sanctuary will be ‘made righteous’.

The ‘desolation’ or ‘astonishment’ may refer to the time when the High Priest Menelaus was appointed who was not of the priestly line, thus defiling the sanctuary, the time when he stole the sacred temple vessels for his own use, taking them out of the sanctuary, the time when he slew the true high priest who was sacred before God, or to the time when the daily sacrifices ceased, all being transgressions which astonished and desolated the true Israel. The transgression may have been that of Antiochus, or that of the high priest, or that of the leadership of Israel who allowed it, or all three.

The ‘two thousand three hundred mornings and evenings’ presents a difficulty of interpretation. Does this mean two thousand three hundred days, (compare the regular use of mornings and evenings in Genesis 1), or does it mean one thousand one hundred and fifty evening sacrifices and one thousand one hundred and fifty morning sacrifices which have been omitted because of the persecution? The latter may well be an accurate indication of the length of time that the sacrifices ceased.

And if it means two thousand three hundred days is it then the equivalent of ‘a time, times (e.g. five times) and half a time’ (Daniel 7:25) where it signified a period that came to more than six but less than seven times, thought of here in terms of years? Seven years would be, say, two thousand five hundred and twenty days, Thus two thousand three hundred could be a round number indicating not reaching the perfect seven years because God prevented it, expressed here in days so as to suggest that every day of that dreadful time was counted by God.

One thing we can be sure of is that it does not mean two thousand three hundred years. It does not say ‘days’ it says evenings and mornings. Besides it is very questionable whether we have a right to see days as representing years anywhere except when it is made perfectly clear in the context. The prophets cannot be so straitjacketed or presumed upon.

If we take the two thousand three hundred evenings and mornings as representing the number of evening and morning sacrifices, thus one thousand one hundred and fifty days, we can obtain this by adding the 1,080 days (360 + 360 + 360) between the sacrificing of a pig on the altar and the purifying of the temple, plus an extra ten as the finalising of the building of the pagan altar was early December and the cessation late December (the former the 15th the latter the 25th of Chislev) making 1,090 days, and adding two round months because the actual sacrifices ceased prior to the altar being set up, thus making 1,150 days. Alternately the two months may be to take into account work done in preparation for the final desecration, once the sacrifices had been forbidden (1 Maccabees 1:45). Either way we can reach the 1,150 days referred to in this chapter as ‘2,300 evenings mornings’ (i.e. morning and evening sacrifices).

If we consider the meaning to be two thousand three hundred days, however, the period being over six years, but falling short of seven, compare ‘a time, times and half a time’, it may be from 171 BC, when Menelaus the High Priest appointed by Antiochus, who was not of the recognised priestly line, profaned the sanctuary itself by acting as High Priest, or from the time when he stole and profaned the temple vessels, or from 170 BC when he killed Onias III, the High Priest recognised by the people and by God (Daniel 11:22), (any of these might be ‘the transgression that appals’) to 164 BC, the death of Antiochus, a date chosen on the grounds that only the death of the defiler could finally ‘make righteous’ the holy sanctuary and ‘atone’ for the blasphemy.

One thing we can be sure of is that it refers to a period during the reign of Antiochus during which he caused the sabbaths and the sacrifices to cease, desecrated the temple and persecuted Israel severely.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Pett, Peter. "Commentary on Daniel 8:13". "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/daniel-8.html. 2013.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

13. “Then I heard a holy one speaking; and another holy one said unto that certain one which spake, How long shall be the vision concerning the continual burnt offering, and the transgression that maketh desolate, to give both the sanctuary and the host to be trodden under foot?” (R.V.) (Compare Daniel 4:13; Zechariah 1:12-13.) Even the angels are interested in the question how long this defilement of the temple and punishment of the holy people is to last. As long as their transgression lasts the punishment will continue. However, the “transgression that maketh desolate” mentioned here may not refer to Israel’s sin but to the “iniquity (or abomination) of desolation” which was set up by this arch transgressor, Antiochus, in the temple. (See notes Daniel 11:31; Daniel 12:11.)


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Daniel 8:13". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/daniel-8.html. 1874-1909.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

The holy ones (Heb. qados) that Daniel heard conversing were evidently angels (cf. Daniel 4:17). Here the transgression in view seems to be that of Antiochus, not the Jews (cf. Daniel 8:12). It causes horror among the Jews because it involves desecration of the sanctuary ( Daniel 8:11). The holy place is the temple, and the host is the Jews. The angel wanted to know how long the desecration of the sanctuary and the persecution of the Jews would last.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Daniel 8:13". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/daniel-8.html. 2012.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Another. We do not inquire how the angels explained themselves, or whether they instruct each other. This conversation was for the prophet's information. (Calmet) --- One angel asked the other a question about futurity. (Worthington)


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Daniel 8:13". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/daniel-8.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

saint = holy [one]. An angelic attendant. Compare Daniel 4:13. Deuteronomy 33:2. Job 5:1; Job 15:15. Psalms 89:5, Psalms 89:7. Zechariah 14:5.

that certain saint = a certain [unnamed] one, or such an one, as in Ruth 4:1. Or, a proper name Palmoni = the wonderful one, or the wonderful [numberer], as in Judges 13:18. Isaiah 9:6. Psalms 139:6.

How long . . . ? Referring to the duration of what is said concerning "the daily sacrifice" and the desolation; not the interval before the fulfillment.

concerning, &c. = of "the daily sacrifice" [as taken away].

and. Supply "and [the setting up of] the desolating (or astounding) rebellion.

to give, &c. : or, after He hath given over the sanctuary, &c.

the host. Here it is the "host", the technical term for the ministers of the sanctuary. Compare Numbers 4:23, Numbers 4:30, Numbers 4:35, Numbers 4:39, Numbers 4:43; Numbers 8:24, Numbers 8:25.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Daniel 8:13". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/daniel-8.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Then I heard one saint speaking, and another saint said unto that certain saint which spake, How long shall be the vision concerning the daily sacrifice, and the transgression of desolation, to give both the sanctuary and the host to be trodden under foot?

Another saint said unto that certain saint. Daniel did not know the names of these two holy angels, but saw only that one was speaking to the other.

How long shall be the vision concerning the daily sacrifice? - How long shall the daily sacrifice be suspended?

And the transgression of desolation - literally, making desolate - i:e., Antiochus' desolating profanation of the temple (Daniel 11:31, "They shall place the abomination that maketh desolate;" Daniel 12:11). See above on Daniel 8:11 the quotation in full from 1 Maccabees 1:1-64. Compare as to Rome and the last Antichrist, Matthew 24:15, "When ye therefore shall see the abomination of desolation (the idol of the pagan invader), spoken of by Daniel the prophet, stand in the holy place ... then let them which be in Judea flies into the mountains").


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Daniel 8:13". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/daniel-8.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(13) One saint—i.e., an angel, who, however, has not been mentioned before. This part of the vision recalls Daniel 7:16. It is implied that the angels were conversing upon the subject of this awful revelation concerning the future of God’s people. Only a portion of what they said is here recorded.

The vision.—The inquiry means, “How long shall be the duration of the object of this vision, so far as it has to do with the great apostasy?”

Transgression of desolation.—Comp. Daniel 9:27. Probably these words mean the same as the “abomination that maketh desolate” (Daniel 11:31; Daniel 12:11; see 1 Maccabees 1:59).


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Daniel 8:13". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/daniel-8.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Then I heard one saint speaking, and another saint said unto that certain saint which spake, How long shall be the vision concerning the daily sacrifice, and the transgression of desolation, to give both the sanctuary and the host to be trodden under foot?
one saint
4:13; 7:16; 12:5,6; Deuteronomy 33:2; Zechariah 1:9-12,19; 2:3,4; 14:5; 1 Thessalonians 3:13; 1 Peter 1:12; Jude 1:14
that certain saint
or, the numberer of secrets, or, the wonderful numberer. Heb. Palmoni.
Judges 13:18; *marg:; Isaiah 9:6; Matthew 11:27; Luke 10:22; John 1:18
How
12:6; Psalms 74:9; 79:5; Isaiah 6:11; Revelation 6:10
the vision
11,12
and the
9:27; 11:31; 12:11; Matthew 24:15; Mark 13:14; Luke 21:20
of desolation
or, making desolate. to be.
7:23; Isaiah 63:18; Luke 21:24; Hebrews 10:29; Revelation 11:2

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Daniel 8:13". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/daniel-8.html.

Lectionary Calendar
Friday, October 30th, 2020
the Week of Proper 25 / Ordinary 30
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
To report dead links, typos, or html errors or suggestions about making these resources more useful use our convenient contact form
Powered by Lightspeed Technology