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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Deuteronomy 5:33

"You shall walk in all the way which the LORD your God has commanded you, that you may live and that it may be well with you, and that you may prolong your days in the land which you will possess.

Adam Clarke Commentary

Ye shall walk in all the ways, etc. - God never gave a commandment to man which he did not design that he should obey. He who selects from the Divine testimonies such precepts as he feels but little inclination to transgress, and lives in the breach of others, sins against the grand legislative authority of God, and shall be treated as a rebel.

That ye may live - תחיון ticheyun, that ye may enjoy life, (for the paragogic nun, at the end of the word, deepens the sense), that it may be well with you לכם ותוב vetob lachem, and good shall be to you - God will prosper you in all things essential to the welfare of your bodies, and the salvation of your souls.

That ye may prolong your days in the land - That ye may arrive at a good old age, and grow more and more meet for the inheritance among the saints in light.

On this very important verse we may remark, a long life is a great blessing, if a man live to God, because it is in life, and in life alone, that a preparation for eternal glory may be acquired. Those who wish to die soon, have never yet learned to live, and know not the value of life or time. Many have a vain hope that they shall get either in death, or in the other world, a preparation for glory. This is a fatal error. Here, alone, we may acquaint ourselves with God, and receive that holiness without which none can see him. Reader, be thankful to him that thou art still in a state of probation; and pray that thou mayest live for eternity.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 5:33". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/deuteronomy-5.html. 1832.

The Biblical Illustrator

Deuteronomy 5:33

That ye may live, and . . . prolong your days.

Prosperity and adversity

I. We fall, I conceive, into a very inaccurate method of speech, when we say that the prize which God proposes to His people is set forth in one of these clauses; the duty, or performance by which they are to earn that prize, in the other. Moses teaches his countrymen that God has conferred upon them the highest prize which man can conceive, freely and without any merit on their part.

II. Is there no duty, then, enjoined in the words of my text? Does it merely speak of a blessing or a privilege? Certainly when it is said, “Ye shall walk in all the ways which the Lord your God hath commanded you,” it must be meant that there was something required on the part of the creature as well as something bestowed by the Creator. If we believe that an actual living being to whom we are related has put us in this way, and that it is a way of dependence upon Himself, we can understand how the preservation of it becomes a duty to Him; we begin in fact to know what duty is. If, finally, we believe that He who puts us in this way is the only person who can keep us in it, or prevent us from going out of it, we may feel that His command is itself a power; that it does not merely say, “Thus and thus you must do, thus and thus you must not do”; but, “This will I enable you to do, this will I prevent you from doing.”

III. We come then at length to this class of blessings which are shortly gathered up in the words: “That ye may live, and that it may be well with you, and that ye may prolong your days in the land which ye shall possess.” It is here signified in very simple, clear language, which admits, I conceive, of no double sense, that a people in a right, orderly, godly state shall be a well-doing people; a people with all the signs and tokens of strength, growth, triumph; a people marked for permanence and indefinite expansion. I cannot put another meaning upon these words; I should think that a wish to dilute their force was a proof of the greatest carelessness about the authority from which they proceed, as well as of the most shocking inhumanity. If it be the distinction of saints and spiritual men that they do not trouble themselves about the external prosperity of a land, that they do not care whether the oxen are strong to labour, whether the sheep are bringing forth thousands and ten thousands, whether there is no complaining in the streets; if they are so occupied in the future as to have no interest in the present, too busy with their souls to have leisure for thinking about the ruin which may be threatening the bodies of their fellow men--then I say at once Moses, David, Isaiah, Jeremiah, were not saints and spiritual men. Since they held that God’s order was the perfectly right and living order, they could not but think that all disorder, all wrong and death which had invaded it, must have come through man’s neglect to fulfil the part which had been assigned him;--through his unwillingness to till and subdue the earth which he was meant to till and subdue; through his idleness and distrust and self-seeking, his refusal to walk in the ways which God had commanded.

IV. And therefore it cannot be true--the whole history of the Jews declares it not to be true--that the blessings of adversity were unknown to them, were reserved for a later period. Which of the good men of the Old Testament was not proved in a furnace? Into whose soul did the iron at some time not enter? It was not because they believed in God’s promises to their nation, and were sure that its outward prosperity must and would at last correspond to its inward health and vitality; it was not because they longed for the earth to bring forth and bud, to have heaps of corn upon it, that its presses might burst forth with new wine; it was not on this account that they had to endure less of inward sadness, or fewer reproaches from the kings and priests and people to whom they spoke. No; the more strong their feeling was that God had chosen their nation and made a covenant with it, the greater was the struggle with their individual selfishness. (F. D. Maurice, M. A.)
.


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Bibliography
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Deuteronomy 5:33". The Biblical Illustrator. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/deuteronomy-5.html. 1905-1909. New York.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Ye shall walk in all the ways which the Lord your God hath commanded you,.... None are to be avoided or departed from on any consideration whatever; see Psalm 119:6 an instance of this we have in Zacharias and Elizabeth, Luke 1:6 that ye may live; corporeally, comfortably, in all the outward enjoyments of life needful for them, particularly in the possession of the land of Canaan, and the benefits of it; for these promises of life upon obedience seem to reach no further, unless as types and emblems of what is enjoyed through the obedience and righteousness of Christ, as the following phrases show:

and that it may be well with you, and that ye may prolong your days in the land which ye shall possess; the land of Canaan; though the Jewish writersF13Moreh Nevochim, par. 3. c. 27. p. 418. carry it further, even to heaven and eternal happiness; and so may we in the sense before given.


Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 5:33". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/deuteronomy-5.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

Ye shall walk in all the ways which the LORD your God hath commanded you, that ye may m live, and [that it may be] well with you, and [that] ye may prolong [your] days in the land which ye shall possess.

(m) In the same way that God, by way of our obedience, gives us all happiness: so from disobeying God proceed all our miseries.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 5:33". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/deuteronomy-5.html. 1599-1645.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

REFLECTIONS

OH! thou great law-giver, and law-fulfiller, of a better dispensation, founded upon better promises! May I behold thee in all thy precious offices and characters, while reading in this chapter thy servant Moses commanding the attention of the people. In the name of JEHOVAH thou camest personally once in the days of thy flesh; and now thou comest spiritually in the day of thy power, commanding all thy people to hear the gospel offer of thy blood and righteousness! Oh! give me grace, to receive thy precious word, and cry out, with the affection of one of old, Oh! how I love thy law! it is my meditation all the day! Blessed JESUS! may it be my portion to receive the law of faith, which is obeyed, not by works of righteousness, which I have done, or can do, but by thine own perfect obedience, in a law-fulfilling, and law-satisfying righteousness. And grant, gracious GOD, that while I see myself justified by thy blood and righteousness from all things by which I never could be justified by the law of Moses, may I be enabled, by the sweet influences of the HOLY GHOST, so to live a life of faith, on thee and thy complete salvation, that though dead to the law, as a covenant of works, I may not be without law unto GOD, but under the law to CHRIST.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 5:33". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/deuteronomy-5.html. 1828.

James Nisbet's Church Pulpit Commentary

THE RIGHT WALK

‘Ye shall walk in all the ways which the Lord your God hath commanded you, that ye may live, and that it may be well with you, and that ye may prolong your days in the land which ye shall possess.’

Deuteronomy 5:33

I. One of these clauses is commonly said to enjoin a duty, the other to promise the blessings which those might confidently look for who performed it. This is not a satisfactory definition. Moses teaches his countrymen that God has conferred upon them the highest, prize which man can conceive, freely and without any merit on their part. Was the knowledge of the living and unseen God nothing in itself, but only valuable in virtue of some results that were to come of it? Moses tells his countrymen that it was everything. To hold it fast was to be a nation; to lose it was to sink back into that condition out of which they had been raised.

II. Is there no duty then assigned in the text?—Certainly when it is said, ‘Ye shall walk in all the ways which the Lord your God hath commanded you,’ it must be meant that there is something required on the part of the creature as well as something bestowed by the Creator. We cannot understand what is required unless we understand what is bestowed. If we believe that a way has been made for us, and that we have been put in that way, we can apprehend the force of the precept to walk in it, we can feel what is meant by transgression and revolt.

III. It is here signified in very simple, clear language that a people in a right, orderly, godly state shall be a well-doing people, a people with all the signs and tokens of strength, growth, triumph, a people marked for permanence and indefinite expansion.

IV. It cannot be true that the blessings of adversity were unknown to the Jews, were reserved for a later period. The more strong their feeling was that God had chosen their nation and made a covenant with it, the greater was their struggle with their individual selfishness, their desire of great things for themselves, the more need had they of God’s fires to purify them. No men could be more taught than the Jewish seers were that punishments are necessary for individuals and nations, and that ‘whom the Lord loveth He chasteneth.’

V. It is a perilous and an almost fatal notion that Christian men have less to do with the present than the Jews had, that their minds and their religion are to be projected into a region after death, because there only the Divine Presence is dwelling. The alternative is between a faith which shall belong to men as men, which shall concern all their ordinary pursuits, toils, relations—the alternative is between such a faith and absolute atheism.

Rev. F. D. Maurice.

Illustration

(1) ‘Man needs a mediator. Conscious of the evil of his heart and life, he dares not face the All Holy. But there is a Mediator, a Daysman; not a servant, however noble and faithful, but the Son, who can lay a hand upon each. He has gone near, and has heard all that the Father has to say, and has spoken it to us; but, oh, how eagerly He yearns that there were such a heart in us that we would keep those commandments always, then indeed it would be well with us. We should live in the power of life eternal. We should possess the land of rest and plenty. We should prolong our days as the days of heaven upon earth.’

(2) ‘The actual entrance into the New Covenant is not effected, unless there has been this personal meeting, this heart to heart contract between the sinner and his Saviour. This is necessary to that vital union to Him on which all Christian life depends. What does the hearer know of this experimentally?’


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Nisbet, James. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 5:33". Church Pulpit Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cpc/deuteronomy-5.html. 1876.

Sermon Bible Commentary

Deuteronomy 5:33

I. One of these clauses is commonly said to enjoin a duty, the other to promise the blessings which those might confidently look for who performed it. This is not a satisfactory definition. Moses teaches his countrymen that God has conferred upon them the highest prize which man can conceive, freely and without any merit on their part. Was the knowledge of the living and unseen God nothing in itself, but only valuable in virtue of some results that were to come of it? Moses tells his countrymen that it was everything. To hold it fast was to be a nation; to lose it was to sink back into that condition out of which they had been raised.

II. Is there no duty then assigned in the text? Certainly when it is said, "Ye shall walk in all the ways which the Lord your God hath commanded you," it must be meant that there is something required on the part of the creature as well as something bestowed by the Creator. We cannot understand what is required unless we understand what is bestowed. If we believe that a way has been made for us, and that we have been put in that way, we can apprehend the force of the precept to walk in it, we can feel what is meant by transgression and revolt.

III. It is here signified in very simple, clear language that a people in a right, orderly, godly state shall be a well-doing people, a people with all the signs and tokens of strength, growth, triumph, a people marked for permanence and indefinite expansion.

IV. It cannot be true that the blessings of adversity were unknown to the Jews, were reserved for a later period. The more strong their feeling was that God had chosen their nation and made a covenant with it, the greater was their struggle with their individual selfishness, their desire of great things for themselves, the more need had they of God's fires to purify them. No men could be more taught than the Jewish seers were that punishments are necessary for individuals and nations, and that "whom the Lord loveth He chasteneth."

V. It is a perilous and an almost fatal notion that Christian men have less to do with the present than the Jews had, that their minds and their religion are to be projected into a region after death, because there only the Divine Presence is dwelling.

The alternative is between a faith which shall belong to men as men, which shall concern all their ordinary pursuits, toils, relations—the alternative is between such a faith and absolute atheism.

F. D. Maurice, Patriarchs and Lawgivers of the Old Testament, p. 241.


References: Deuteronomy 6:1-12.—Parker, vol. iv., p. 136. Deuteronomy 6:1-25.—Clergyman's Magazine, vol. iv., p. 217.




Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Nicoll, William R. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 5:33". "Sermon Bible Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/sbc/deuteronomy-5.html.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Ye shall walk in all the ways which the LORD your God hath commanded you, that ye may live, and that it may be well with you, and that ye may prolong your days in the land which ye shall possess.
walk
10:12; Psalms 119:6; Jeremiah 7:23; Luke 1:6; Romans 2:7
well
29; 4:40; Jeremiah 7:23; 1 Timothy 4:8

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Deuteronomy 5:33". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/deuteronomy-5.html.


Lectionary Calendar
Monday, November 12th, 2018
the Week of Proper 27 / Ordinary 32
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