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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Ecclesiastes 5:10

He who loves money will not be satisfied with money, nor he who loves abundance with its income. This too is vanity.

Adam Clarke Commentary

He that loveth silver shall not be satisfied with silver - The more he gets, the more he would get; for the saying is true: -

Crescit amor nummi, quantum ipsa pecunia crescit.

"The love of money increases, in proportion as money itself increases."


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Ecclesiastes 5:10". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/ecclesiastes-5.html. 1832.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

RICHES UNABLE TO SATISFY THE POSSESSOR

"He that loveth silver shall not be satisfied with silver; nor he that loveth abundance, with increase: This also is vanity. When goods are increased, they are increased that eat them; and what advantage is there to the owner thereof, save the beholding of them with his eyes? The sleep of the laboring man is sweet, whether he eat little or much; but the fullness of the rich man will not suffer him to sleep."

"He that loveth silver shall not be satisfied with silver" (Ecclesiastes 5:10). Solomon in these lines appears to be envious of the peaceful sleep of an ordinary laboring man; and there is a confession here by the richest man of all antiquity that wealth had brought him no satisfaction, but only more responsibility, more anxiety and sleeplessness.

"They are increased that eat them" (Ecclesiastes 5:11). This, of course, is just another way of saying that, "as people make more money, their expenses also increase." It is even true in the physical sense of the human body itself. It requires much more to feed a fat man than a lean one.


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James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Ecclesiastes 5:10". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/ecclesiastes-5.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

He that loveth silver shall not be satisfied with silver,.... The tillage of the earth is necessary, a very laudable and useful employment, and men do well to busy themselves in it; without this, neither the common people nor the greatest personages can be supplied with the necessaries of life; but then an immoderate love of money is criminal, which is here meant by loving silver, one kind of money, which when loved beyond measure is the root of all evil; and besides, when a man has got ever so much of it, he is not satisfied, he still wants more, like the horse leech at the vein cries Give, give; or he cannot eat silver, so Jarchi; or be "fed with money", as Mr. Broughton renders it; and herein the fruits of the earth, for which the husbandman labours, have the preference to silver; for these he can eat, and be filled and satisfied with them, but he cannot eat his bags of gold and silver;

nor he that loveth abundance with increase; that is, he that coveteth a great deal of this world's things shall not be satisfied with the increase of them, let that be what it will; or, he shall have "no increase"F6לא תבואה "non erit proventus illi", Vatablus, Mercerus, Gejerus; "nullum fructum percipit", Tigurine version. , be ever the better for his abundance, or enjoy the comfort and benefit of it: or, "he that loveth abundance from whence there is no increase"F7"Qui amat copiam, sc. multitudinem ex qua non est sperandus profectus", Schmidt, so Gussetius. ; that loves to have a multitude of people about him, as manservants and maidservants; a large equipage, as Aben Ezra suggests, which are of very little use and service, or none at all;

this is also vanity: the immoderate love of money, coveting large estates and possessions, and to have a train of servants. Jarchi allegorically interprets silver and abundance, of the commands, and the multitude of them.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Ecclesiastes 5:10". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/ecclesiastes-5.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Not only will God punish at last, but meanwhile the oppressive gainers of “silver” find no solid “satisfaction” in it.

shall not be satisfied — so the oppressor “eateth his own flesh” (see on Ecclesiastes 4:1 and see on Ecclesiastes 4:5).

with increase — is not satisfied with the gain that he makes.


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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Ecclesiastes 5:10". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/ecclesiastes-5.html. 1871-8.

Keil & Delitzsch Commentary on the Old Testament

“He who loveth silver is not satisfied with silver; and he whose love cleaveth to abundance, hath nothing of it: also this is vain.” The transition in this series of proverbs is not unmediated; for the injustice which, according to Ecclesiastes 5:7, prevails in the state as it now is becomes subservient to covetousness, in the very nature of which there lies insatiableness: semper avarus eget, hunc nulla pecunia replet . That the author speaks of the “ sacra fames argenti ” (not auri ) arises from this, that not זהב , but כסף , is the specific word for coin.

(Note: A Jewish fancy supposes that כסף is chosen because it consists of letters rising in value (20, 60, 80); while, on the contrary, זהב consists of letters decreasing in value (7, 5, 2).)

Mendelssohn-Friedländer also explains: “He who loveth silver is not satisfied with silver,” i.e. , it does not make him full; that might perhaps be linguistically possible (cf. e.g. , Proverbs 12:11), although the author would in that case probably have written the words מן־הכּסף , after Ecclesiastes 6:3; but “to be not full of money” is, after Ecclesiastes 1:8, and especially Ecclesiastes 4:8, Habakkuk 2:5, cf. Proverbs 27:20 = never to have enough of money, but always to desire more.

That which follows, Ecclesiastes 5:9 , is, according to Hitz., a question: And who hath joy in abundance, which bringeth nothing in? But such questions, with the answer to be supplied, are not in Koheleth's style; and what would then be understood by capital without interest? Others, as Zöckler, supply ישׂבּע : and he that loveth abundance of possessions (is) not (full) of income; but that which is gained by these hard ellipses is only a tautology. With right, the Targ., Syr., Jerome, the Venet., and Luther take lo tevuah as the answer or conclusion; and who clings to abundance of possessions with his love? - he has no fruit thereof; or, with a weakening of the interrog. pronoun into the relative (as at Ecclesiastes 1:9; cf. under Psalms 34:13): he who ... clings has nothing of it. Hamon signifies a tumult, a noisy multitude, particularly of earthly goods, as at Psalms 37:16; 1 Chronicles 29:16; Isaiah 60:5. The connection of אהב with ב , occurring only here, follows the analogy of חפץ בּ and the like. The conclusion is synon. with levilti ho'il ; e.g. , Isaiah 44:10; Jeremiah 7:8. All the Codd. read לא ; לו in this sense would be meaningless.

(Note: In Maccoth 10 a , לו is read three times in succession; the Midrash Wajikra , c. 22, reads לא , and thus it is always found without Kerı̂ and without variation.)

The designation of advantage by tevuah , the farmer enjoys the fruit of his labour; but he who hangs his heart on the continual tumult, noise, pomp of more numerous and greater possessions is possible, to him all real profit - i.e. , all pleasant, peaceful enjoyment - is lost. With the increase of the possessions there is an increase also of unrest, and the possessor has in reality nothing but the sight of them.


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The Keil & Delitzsch Commentary on the Old Testament is a derivative of a public domain electronic edition.

Bibliography
Keil, Carl Friedrich & Delitzsch, Franz. "Commentary on Ecclesiastes 5:10". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/kdo/ecclesiastes-5.html. 1854-1889.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Ecclesiastes 5:10 He that loveth silver shall not be satisfied with silver; nor he that loveth abundance with increase: this [is] also vanity.

Ver. 10. He that loveth silver shall not be satisfied with silver.] As he cannot fill his belly, nor clothe his back with it, so neither can he satisfy his inordinate appetite and desire after it, though he had heaped and hoarded it up, as the great Caliph of Babylon had - that covetous wretch, starved to death by Haalon, brother to Mango, the great Cham of Cataia, in the midst of his gold, silver, and precious stones, whereof, till then, he could never have enough. (a) Auri nempe fames parto fit maior ab auro, (b) A man may as soon fill a chest with grace as a heart with wealth. As a circle cannot fill a triangle, so neither can the whole world, if it could be compassed, possibly fill the heart of man. Anima rationalis caeteris omnibus occupari potest, impleri non potest: (c) The reasonable soul may be busied about other things, but it cannot be filled with them. Non plus satiatur cor auro, quam corpus aura, As air fills not the body, so neither doth money the mind. It cannot, therefore, be man’s chiefest good, as mammonists make it, since it doth not terminate his appetite, but that although he hath never so much of it, yet is he as hungry after more as if he were not worth a halfpenny. Theoeritus brings in the covetous person first wishing -

Mille meis errent in montibus agni;

that he had a thousand sheep in his flock. And this when he had gotten, then, Pauperis est namerare pecus. He would have cattle without number. The Greeks derive their word for desire (d) from a root that signifieth to burn, Now, if one should heap never so much fuel upon a fire, it would not quench it, but kindle it the more. So here. Surely, as a ship may be overladen with silver, even unto sinking, and yet have compass and sides enough to hold ten times more, so a covetous wretch, though he hath enough to sink him, yet never hath he enough to satisfy him. Cataline was ever alieni appetens, sui profusus, (e) not more prodigal of his own than desirous after other men’s estates.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Ecclesiastes 5:10". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/ecclesiastes-5.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Ecclesiastes 5:10. He that loveth abundance, &c.— And he who loveth numerous company, no income shall be sufficient for him. See Desvoeux, p. 281.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Ecclesiastes 5:10". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/ecclesiastes-5.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

The greatest treasures of silver do not satisfy the covetous possessor of it; partly because his mind is insatiable, and his desires are increased by and with gains; partly because silver of itself cannot satisfy his natural desires and necessities as the fruits of the field can do, and the miserable wretch grudgeth to part with his silver, though it be to purchase things needful and convenient for him.

That loveth abundance; or, that loveth it (to wit, silver) in abundance; that desires and lays up great treasures.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Ecclesiastes 5:10". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/ecclesiastes-5.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

10. Loveth silver — In several languages “silver” is the general term for money. The first money spoken of in Scripture — coined silver — is called “lambs,” each piece being the value of a lamb. Numa, who first coined money at Rome, made pieces of “silver” equal in value to a sheep, and bearing the figure of a sheep, pecus, whence our word “pecuniary.”

Not be satisfied — The insatiable nature of avarice is the frequent theme of the moralist in all ages. This “dropsy of the soul” grows ever more thirsty.

“The pale and servile drudge “twixt man and man,” has in itself little value, but it can represent many values, and for that, is desirable. The perpetration of any crime can be procured with money, as some one can always be found who can be hired, and so “the love of money” becomes the root of any evil. The perpetual annoyance of the wealthy man is in the fact that so many, caring little for him, are greedy for his money. Little can he know who, if any, are his true and disinterested friends. Thus, a great estate, if it is to be kept such, demands care and labour that only its owner can perform, while, for himself, he can take but such good of food, clothing, and pleasure as one little body and soul can appropriate. The rest, beyond the gratification of seeing it, is all for others. The inward consciousness of this often makes the rich the more jealous, proud, and peevish.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Ecclesiastes 5:10". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/ecclesiastes-5.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Them. He shews the vanity of the great.


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Ecclesiastes 5:10". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/ecclesiastes-5.html. 1859.

Mark Dunagan Commentary on the Bible

"He who loves money will not be satisfied with money, nor he who loves abundance with its income. This too is vanity."

One of the great passages on the lack of real satisfaction which every greedy person will eventually face. "The unappeased craving it creates is very obvious in the gambler, the tycoon and the well-paid materialist who never has enough-for the love of money grows by what it feeds on…If anything is worse than the addiction money brings, it is the emptiness it leaves. Man, with eternity in his heart, needs better nourishment than this" (Kidner p. 56). This is one reason why greed will plunge us into destruction (1 Timothy f). Even though Jesus plainly said that no man can serve two masters (Matt. 6:24), many people seem bent on trying to prove Him wrong.


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Bibliography
Dunagan, Mark. "Commentary on Ecclesiastes 5:10". "Mark Dunagan Commentaries on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dun/ecclesiastes-5.html. 1999-2014.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

nor he that loveth, &c. = And who is [ever] content with abundance without increase (capital without interest). No socialism or "corruption" of text here.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Ecclesiastes 5:10". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/ecclesiastes-5.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

He that loveth silver shall not be satisfied with silver; nor he that loveth abundance with increase: this is also vanity.

Not be satisfied with silver Not only will God punish at last, but meanwhile, "not be satisfied with silver" - the oppressive gainers of "silver" find no solid 'satisfaction' in it.

Nor he that loveth abundance (Hamon-literally, multitude, bustle; implying the turmoil which is inseparable from wealth) "with increase" - is not satisfied with the gain that he makes.


Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Ecclesiastes 5:10". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/ecclesiastes-5.html. 1871-8.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

He that loveth silver shall not be satisfied with silver; nor he that loveth abundance with increase: this is also vanity.
He that
The more he gets, the more he would get; for Crescit amor nummi, quantum ipsa pecunia crescit, "The love of money increases, in proportion as money itself increases."
4:8; 6:7; Psalms 52:1,7; 62:10; Proverbs 30:15,16; Habakkuk 2:5-7; Matthew 6:19,24; Luke 12:15; 1 Timothy 6:10
this
1:17; 2:11,17,18,26; 3:19; 4:4,8,16

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Ecclesiastes 5:10". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/ecclesiastes-5.html.

Ecclesiastes 5:10 The rich man is the heathen. This is especially clear in Ecclesiastes 5:6 where the same subject is treated. But it is also evident from a comparison with Ecclesiastes 5:7, where the poor man is the Israelite. The connection with Ecclesiastes 5:7-8 is quite plain. There the minds of those who lie groaning under the oppressions of the heathen are directed to the impending judgment of God. Here the author exhibits to them the true significance of riches, and thus teaches them to regard in a different manner their own losses, and the heathen gains. Hitzig remarks, "this section consoles the poor man, or him who is poor in the way described in Ecclesiastes 5:7; the friend of money, (Ecclesiastes 5:9), is one who from covetousness oppresses the poor, (Ecclesiastes 5:7). In James 2:1-13; James 5:1-6, also is the rich man the heathen. He is foolish who vexes himself about a handful of vanity:"—this is proved in the first class, by the fact that riches do not satisfy the heart,—a fact which must be patent to every one who has noticed how the rich man is ever craving for more. In the second clause of the verse it is affirmed that riches afford no profit at all, that they are unfruitful. To the words here, "He that loveth silver shall not be satisfied with riches," Jerome adduces the parallel dictum from Horace, "semper avarus eget." Luther compares Ecclesiastes 1:8, "the eye is not satisfied with seeing, nor the ear filled with hearing:" and remarks—"Alexander the Great had not enough in his many kingdoms, not even in a whole world. It is just so in other things also. The man who has learning, wisdom, honour, property, strength, beauty, health, and so forth, is notwithstanding not satisfied therewith. Thus the wretched poverty-stricken life of the covetous man is a good mirror for the rest of us. For as the greedy bellies and penny kissers have money and yet dare not use a farthing of it cheerfully, but are constantly looking further for money which they have not, so is our conduct m regard to all other gifts. What is a poor, troubled, uneasy heart and mind, which is always looking for that which it does not yet possess but avaricious: therefore is it vanity and vexation? Are not on the contrary those happy people who content themselves with God's present mercies, with moderate means of life, and leave God to care for the future?" And whoso loveth riches hath no gain: Vulgate: fructum non capiet ex eis. In regard to מי אהב, which corresponds to the simple אהב previously employed, see Ewald, § 331 b. (ion never signifies directly riches, but always, noise, bustle. In Psalms 37:16, the noise of the wicked stands for their wealth, which surrounds them who scrape together, who employ cunning and force, with noise, bustle and disquiet: and so here riches are represented as tumult, noise. We are thus taught that they have much inconvenience from this wealth of nothing. Why there is no profit is further shown subsequently when the author seeks by a vivid and picturesque representation to impress their hearts with the fact that life does not consist in the multitude of our possessions. Also this is vanity; like so much besides on this poor earth which offers so many fictitious possessions.


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Bibliography
Hengstenberg, Ernst. "Commentary on Ecclesiastes 5:10". Ernst Hengstenberg on John, Revelation, Ecclesiastes, Ezekiel & Psalms. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/heg/ecclesiastes-5.html.

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