Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Haggai 2:16

from that time when one came to a grain heap of twenty measures, there would be only ten; and when one came to the wine vat to draw fifty measures, there would be only twenty.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Lukewarmness;   Thompson Chain Reference - Agriculture;   Agriculture-Horticulture;   Barrenness;   Winepress;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Oil;   Olive-Tree, the;   Wine;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Press;   Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Zechariah, book of;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Consecrate;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Fat;   Wine;   Wine-Press;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Haggai;   Oil;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Haggai;   Pressfat;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Haggai;   Press, Pressfat;   Wine and Strong Drink;   Zerubbabel;   Hastings' Dictionary of the New Testament - Messiah;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Haggai ;   Zerubbabel ;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Obsolete or obscure words in the english av bible;   Smith Bible Dictionary - Fat,;   Watson's Biblical & Theological Dictionary - Wine Press;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Haggai;   Joshua (3);   Pressfat;   Wine;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Since those days were - I have shown my displeasure against you, by sending blasting and mildew; and so poor have been your crops that a heap of corn which should have produced twenty measures produced only ten; and that quantity of grapes which in other years would have produced fifty measures, through their poverty, smallness, etc., produced only twenty. And this has been the case ever since the first stone was laid in this temple; for your hearts were not right with me, and therefore I blasted you in all the labors of your hands; and yet ye have not turned to me, Haggai 2:17.

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Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Haggai 2:16". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/haggai-2.html. 1832.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

"Through all that time, when one came to a heap of twenty measures, there were but ten; when one came to the winevat to draw out fifty vessels, there were but twenty."

"Through all that time ..." Through all the fourteen years after they had returned to Jerusalem to rebuild the Temple, and during which time they had utterly neglected it. Crops failed, expectations were not met; God did not bless them. So-called "modern man" is inclined to reject any view that connects his earthly success with concern for holy religion, but he is profoundly wrong in this. A broad view of the human race on earth clearly reveals that the people who have honored God enjoy degrees of earthly prosperity unmatched and even unapproached by anything visible in those lands where paganism still prevails. As long as a substantial proportion of a nation are God-fearing, honest, Christ-worshipping people, the land prospers, much of the prosperity spilling over to bless blatant and unrepentant sinners; but when the character of a whole nation is changed, the blessings of God are invariably withheld. Individually, therefore, there must be countless exceptions to the principle expounded by Haggai; but, as applied to nations, there are no historical exceptions to it. Godless Russia, possessing three fifths of the resources of the whole world today and unable to feed its population is a classical and current example.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Haggai 2:16". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/haggai-2.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Since those days were,.... From the time the foundation of the temple was laid, unto the time they began to work again, which was a space of about fifteen or sixteen years:

when one came to an heap of twenty measures, there were but ten; when the husbandman having gathered in his corn, and who was generally a good judge of what it would yield, came to a heap of it on his corn floor, either of sheaves not threshed, or grain not winnowed, and expected it would have produced at least twenty measures, seahs, or bushels; afterward it was threshed and winnowed, to his great disappointment he had but ten out of it; there were so much straw and chaff, and so little grain; or when he came to a heap of grain, wheat, or barley, in his granary, where he thought he should have twenty bushels of it; but when he had measured it, proved but ten; being either stolen by thieves, or eaten by vermin; rather the latter:

when one came to the wine vat for to draw out fifty vessels out of the press, there were but twenty; by the quantity of grapes which he put into the press to tread and squeeze, he expected to have had fifty measures, or baths, or hogsheads of wine; but, instead of that, had but twenty; the bunches were so thin, or the berries so bad: there was a greater decrease and deficiency in the wine than in the grain.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Haggai 2:16". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/haggai-2.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

i Since those [days] were, when [one] came to an heap of twenty [measures], there were [but] ten: when [one] came to the pressfat for to draw out fifty [vessels] out of the press, there were [but] twenty.

(i) That is, before the building was begun.
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Bibliographical Information
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Haggai 2:16". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/haggai-2.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Since those days were — from the time that those days of your neglect of the temple work have been.

when one came to an heap of twenty measures - that is, to a heap which he had expected would be one of twenty measures, there were but ten.

fifty vessels out of the press — As the Septuagint translates “measure,” and Vulgate “a flagon,” and as we should rather expect vat than press. Maurer translates (omitting vessels, which is not in the original), “{purahs},” or “wine-measures.”

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Haggai 2:16". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/haggai-2.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Since those days were, when one came to an heap of twenty measures, there were but ten: when one came to the pressfat for to draw out fifty vessels out of the press, there were but twenty.

Since — All the while the temple lay neglected.

When one came — Men are disappointed half in half.

But ten — Which he expected would prove twenty measures, ephahs or bushels. It proved but half your hope, thus your corn failed, and your oil much more.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Haggai 2:16". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/haggai-2.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Haggai 2:16 Since those [days] were, when [one] came to an heap of twenty [measures], there were [but] ten: when [one] came to the pressfat for to draw out fifty [vessels] out of the press, there were [but] twenty.

Ver. 16. Since those days were] Or, as some read it, Antequam essent in eo opere, Before they were about that work, minding God’s house more than their own.

When one came to an heap of twenty measures] That is, where you expected twenty measures (and experienced good husbands can partly guess at harvest how their grain will yield when threshed out) there were but ten. God’s hand was upon your increase, not in the field only, but also in the floor; so that you were defeated and your hopes frustrated; and not in the barn only, but at the winepress too, God hath cut you short. This was that which was long before threatened, but little regarded, Deuteronomy 28:20. Carnal men read the threats of God’s law as they do the old stories of foreign wars, or as they behold the wounds and blood in a picture, or piece of coat of arms, which never makes them smart or fear. This hasteneth their judgment, and shows them ripe for wrath, even then when they think themselves far enough out of the reach of God’s rod.

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Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Haggai 2:16". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/haggai-2.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Haggai 2:16. Since those days, &c.— The prophet is here speaking of the dearth and famine consequent upon their neglect of building the temple. The present verse is very elliptical; if the first clause were to be explained by the second, which it reasonably may, it should be rendered, When one came to an heap for twenty measures; that is to say, when a person came to a heap of corn, to draw out twenty measures from it, it was found so deficient, as to supply only ten. Such also was the case with respect to those who came to draw out fifty measures of wine from the wine-press. Dr. Gill explains it, "When the husbandman, having gathered in his corn, who is generally a good judge of what it would yield, came to a heap of it on his corn floor, either of sheaves unthreshed, or of corn unwinnowed, and expected that it would have produced at least twenty measures, after it was threshed and winnowed; to his great disappointment he had but ten out of it."

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Haggai 2:16". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/haggai-2.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Since those days; all that while the temple lay neglected, and you were contented with maimed and half worship, men were disappointed half in half.

When one came to a heap, which he expected would prove twenty measures, ephahs, or bushels, or what other measure you please,

there were but ten; it proved but half your hopes; thus your corn failed: but your oil much more failed, and you found but two where you expected five: this barrenness you cannot be ignorant of.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Haggai 2:16". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/haggai-2.html. 1685.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Day, the 24th of the ninth month, when you began to build, ver. 19. Henceforward your crops shall be abundant. (Menochius) --- I judge not from natural appearances, as the corn is still in the granary, ver. 20. (Calmet) --- Upon a stone. The foundations had been laid the year after the Jews returned, and an altar set up, 1 Esdras iii. Nothing more of consequence was done till the second year of Darius. The temple was finished and dedicated in the sixth, 1 Esdras vi. 15. Hence Aggeus speaks of the stones to be used hereafter. Those in the foundation were to be laid afresh, (ver. 19) or were not seen or noticed. In the same sense our Saviour predicts, that a stone shall not be left upon a stone in the temple, which the Romans should destroy before that generation had passed away, Matthew xxiv. 2, 34. This was verified within forty years. Yet A. Rutter observes it was more fully accomplished when the Jews dug up the foundations, by order of Julian, who wished to falsify the prediction. (Haydock)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Haggai 2:16". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/haggai-2.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

measures. Supply "sheaves".

there = and there.

vessels. Omit "vessels". Hebrew. purah = a winepress. Occurs only here, and Isaiah 63:3. Hence used of a wine measure.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Haggai 2:16". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/haggai-2.html. 1909-1922.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(16) Since those days were.—Better, from the time when things were so, or, since such things were—i.e., throughout that whole period of neglect up to the date when they resumed the work of restoration. Throughout that period the harvests had grievously disappointed expectation. A heap of sheaves which ought to have contained “twenty “—the measure is not specified—yielded only “ten;” and a quantity of grapes which should have yielded fifty poorahs, only produced twenty. The word poorah elsewhere means a “wine press;” here, apparently, it is the bucket or vessel which was used to draw up the wine. The last clause of the verse must therefore be rendered “When one came to the pressfat to draw out fifty poorahs, there were but twenty.”

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Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Haggai 2:16". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/haggai-2.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Since those days were, when one came to an heap of twenty measures, there were but ten: when one came to the pressfat for to draw out fifty vessels out of the press, there were but twenty.
when one came to an
1:6,9-11; Proverbs 3:9,10; Zechariah 8:10-12; Malachi 2:2
Reciprocal: Leviticus 26:20 - for your land;  Deuteronomy 28:16 - in the field;  Psalm 107:37 - which may;  Psalm 132:15 - bless her provision;  Proverbs 11:24 - but;  Ecclesiastes 5:14 - those;  Jeremiah 12:13 - sown;  Jeremiah 48:33 - caused;  Hosea 2:9 - take;  Hosea 9:2 - floor;  Joel 2:19 - I will send;  Joel 2:22 - for the tree;  Micah 6:14 - eat;  Habakkuk 3:17 - the fig tree;  Matthew 4:4 - but;  Matthew 6:33 - seek;  Acts 12:20 - because;  1 Corinthians 16:2 - as God

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Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Haggai 2:16". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/haggai-2.html.