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Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Isaiah 57:19

Creating the praise of the lips. Peace, peace to him who is far and to him who is near," Says the LORD, "and I will heal him."

Adam Clarke Commentary

I create the fruit of the lips - "The sacrifice of praise," saith St. Paul, Hebrews 13:15, "is the fruit of the lips." God creates this fruit of the lips, by giving new subject and cause of thanksgiving by his mercies conferred on those among his people, who acknowledge and bewail their transgressions, and return to him. The great subject of thanksgiving is peace, reconciliation and pardon, offered to them that are nigh, and to them that are afar off, not only to the Jew, but also to the Gentile, as St. Paul more than once applies those terms, Ephesians 2:13, Ephesians 2:17. See also Acts 2:39.

Peace to him that is far off "That is, to the penitent; and to him that is near, i.e., the righteous." - Kimchi.


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Bibliography
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Isaiah 57:19". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/isaiah-57.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

I create the fruit of the lips - The Chaldee and Syriac render this, ‹The words of the lips.‘ The ‹fruit‘ of the lips is that which the lips produce, that is, words; and the reference here is doubtless to offerings of praise and thanksgiving. See Hebrews 13:15; where the phrase, ‹fruit of the lips‘ ( καρπὸς χειλέων karpos cheileōn ), is explained to mean praise. Compare Hosea 14:2, where the expression, ‹we will render the calves of the lips,‘ means that they would offer praise. The sense here is, that God bestowed such blessings as made thanksgiving proper, and thus, he ‹created the fruit of the lips.‘

Peace, peace - The great subject of the thanksgiving would be peace. The peace here referred to probably had a primary reference to the cessation of the calamities which would soon overwhelm the Jewish nation, and their restoration again to their own land. But the whole strain of the passage also shows that the prophet had a more general truth in his view, and that he refers to that peace which would diffuse joy among all who were far off, and those who were near. Paul evidently alludes to this passage in Ephesians 2:14-17. Thus understood, the more general reference is to the peace. which the Messiah would introduce, and which would lay the foundation for universal rejoicing and praise (compare the notes at Isaiah 2:4; Isaiah 9:5).

To him that is far off - Applied by the apostle Paul to the Gentiles, who are represented as having been far off from God, or as aliens or strangers to him Ephesians 2:17.

And to him that is near - That is, to the Jewish people Ephesians 2:17, represented as having been comparatively near to God in the enjoyment of religious privileges.


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Bibliography
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Isaiah 57:19". "Barnes' Notes on the New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/isaiah-57.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Isaiah 57:19

I create the fruit of the lips

Peace, peace

I.
THE GRAND SUBJECT OF HE GOSPEL PROCLAMATION. “Peace, peace! saith the Lord.” It implies a state of previous enmity and quarrel: a state of alarm and disquietude: and a remedy for both.

1. And does not the message of the Gospel find us in a state of enmity? We are not only “by nature children of wrath,” but by voluntary choice we have rebelled against our God.

2. And in a state of alarm and disquietude?

II. THE UNLIMITED OFFER OF ITS BENEFITS. “To him that is far off, and to him that is near, Peace, peace, saith the Lord.”

1. In respect of outward privileges, the Jewish Church was “near,” and all other nations were ‘ far off.

2. In respect of moral character, some may be thought nearer to God, some further off; and still no difference is made.

3. In respect of inward experience, again, some may feel discouraged by the idea that others have greater nearness to God than themselves.

4. In respect of local distance, “God is still no respecter of persons.” He orders that His Gospel be “preached in all the world.’

III. THE HOLY CHANGE INVARIABLY CONNECTED WITH THE RECEPTION OF THEM. “I will heal him.” (J. Jowett, M. A.)

The fruit of the lips

Our text tells us that God creates the fruit of the lips; but this must be understood, of course, with a reservation. He does not create the fruit of the lips as we commonly see it, but the good fruit, the true fruit, the fruit worth gathering. Because the natural fruit is so evil it needs the Creator again to step m, and make us new creatures, and our fruit new also, or else it will remain so bad that the verdict upon it must be “Vanity of vanities, all is vanity.” And what is that fruit which the Creator produces from a source which is naturally so barren?

1. The sacrifice of thanksgiving (Hebrews 13:15). The fruit of the lips which God creates should be, above all things, praise.

2. Prayer.

3. Testimony.

4. There is one renowned topic upon which the lips ought always to be able to speak, and that is summed up in the two words, “Peace, peace.” From the mouth of truth should come kisses of peace, words of peace, the breath of peace. This is the best lip-salve--“Peace, peace.” Nothing can so sweeten the breath as “Peace, peace.” Nothing can so flavour the palate and delight the heart as this “Peace, peace,” felt within, and breathed without. No teeth of ivory, nor lips of coral, are complete in loveliness till over all there glistens the brightness of peace. Fierce speech becomes not loveliness, and threatening and clamour destroy beauty, but the charm of the lips is peace. (C. H. Spurgeon.)

Rare fruit

We shall employ these words--

I. AS THE CRY OF THE AWAKENED. When men are awakened by the grace of God into a consciousness of their true condition they find themselves at war with God and at war with their own consciences, and consequently they begin to cry, “Peace, peace:” longing eagerly to end the dreadful conflict in which they find themselves engaged. Then there visits the man one who knowingly whispers, “You need not disturb yourself. These things are not so. Do you not know that these are all bugbears of a past generation? We men of modern thought have made great discoveries, and changed all the fears of our benighted ancestors into a brave unbelief. You can live at ease. Do not fret yourself about sin, or heaven, or hell, or eternity.” Vain are these stale scepticisms, the man is too much in earnest to be drugged with such soporifics. Boastful unbelief has small power over an agonized soul. God Himself has convinced this man of sin, of righteousness, and of judgment, and though he tries to disbelieve he cannot. Mr. Worldly Wiseman calls upon him, with his friend Dr. Legality, and his assistant-surgeon Mr. Civility, and these try their Balm of Conceit and Plaister of Natural Goodness. But if God has been dealing with this man, he will say, “But I am not right. I feel that I deserve the wrath of God, and that goodness is not in me.” No, the leprosy lies deep within, and no outward form can cleanse away the deep-seated pollution.

II. THIS IS THE ANSWER OF THE SAVIOUR. It is the fruit of the Saviour’s lips. He comes to a soul and says, “Peace, peace.” Did you ever see Him as dying of sin? If you have never seen Him with the eye of faith you do not know what peace means. But did you ever see Christ as He is risen from the dead? Here is another vision of consolation, another fount of peace. Did you ever see Jesus as He sits there triumphant at the Lord God’s fight hand? A poor, tried spirit is greatly comforted by that sight. If I were to go on picturing our glorious Lord Jesus Christ in any and all of His relationships to us, we should in each case hear Him say, “Peace, peace.”

III. AS THE SONG OF THE TRUE BELIEVER. He who has really, seen Christ, and placed his trust in Him, can now sing, “Peace, peace, peace.

IV. THIS SHOULD BE THE MOTTO OF EVERY BELIEVER.

1. This should be his spirit and desire in the Church, “Peace, peace.”

2. We should labour to carry out the, same quiet spirit in the family. When you get home do not change “Peace, peace, ‘into scolding and nagging. “If it be possible, as much as lieth in you, live peaceably with all men.’

3. When peace reigns in your own family, go into the world with the same watchword--“Peace, peace.’” Do not set dogs by the ears, but tame lions and tigers. Compose differences, and make people friends.

4. What a difference there will be when this is taken up among all Christian sects--when there shall be no more envying and strife between this denomination and that, but each one shall be saying in Christ’s name, “We are brethren--peace, peace.” (C. H. Spurgeon.)


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Bibliography
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Isaiah 57:19". The Biblical Illustrator. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/isaiah-57.html. 1905-1909. New York.

Coffman's Commentaries on the Bible

"I create the fruit of the lips: Peace, peace, to him that is far off and to him that is near, saith Jehovah; and I will heal him."

The apostle Peter on the Day of Pentecost applied the expression, "to him that is far off," to the call of the Gentiles into the ranks of the Church (Acts 2:39). The literal words in the Greek here are "far from the temple," thus applying to all persons, even to those who were not Jews. Note also God's promise of healing, which is here a promise of pardon and forgiveness of sins.


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James Burton Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

Bibliography
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Isaiah 57:19". "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/isaiah-57.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

I create the fruit of the lips,.... Which is praise and thanksgiving, Hebrews 13:16 that is, give occasion of it, afford matter for it, by restoring comforts to the church and its mourners, as in the preceding verse; and by giving peace, as in all the following words. The Targum renders it,

"the speech of the lips in the mouth of all men;'

as if it respected that blessing of nature, speech, common to all mankind: whereas this is a blessing of grace, peculiar to some that share in the above blessings; and it may be restrained to Gospel ministers, the fruit of whose lips is the Gospel of peace; or the word preaching peace by Christ; the word of reconciliation committed to them; the subject of their ministry, as follows:

peace, peace to him that is far off, and to him that is near, saith the Lord; peace with God, made by Christ, is the fruit of Jehovah the Father's lips, who promised it in covenant, on condition of Christ's shedding his blood to make it; whence the covenant is called the covenant of peace; and spoke of it in prophecy, as what should be obtained by Christ the peacemaker; and peace of conscience flowing from it is the fruit of Christ's lips, who promised to give it to, and leave it with, his disciples; and that they should have it in him, when they had tribulation in the world; and who also by his apostles went and

preached peace to them that were afar off, and to them that were nigh; having first made it by the blood of his cross, Ephesians 2:17 in which place there seems a manifest reference to this passage, when the Gospel was preached to the Jews that were near; to them in Judea first, from whence it first came; and then to the Gentiles that were afar off, as well as the dispersed Jews in distant countries; and in the latter day, to which this prophecy refers, it will be preached far and near, even all the world over; when the earth will be filled with the knowledge of the Gospel of peace, through the ministry of a set of men raised up by the Lord, created for that purpose, and eminently furnished for such service; the effect of which will be great spiritual peace in the hearts of God's people, and much concord, unity, and love among them, as well as there will be an abundance of external peace and prosperity; and when nations shall learn war no more. This Kimchi and Ben Melech take to be yet future, and what will be after the war of Gog and Magog: "and I will heal them"; of all their soul sicknesses and maladies; of all their divisions and declensions; of their carnality and earthly mindedness, before complained of; and even of all their sins and backslidings; and restore them to perfect health in their souls, and in their church state.


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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855

Bibliography
Gill, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 57:19". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/isaiah-57.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

I create the x fruit of the lips; Peace, peace to [him that is] y far off, and to [him that is] near, saith the LORD; and I will heal him.

(x) That is, I frame the speech and words of my messengers who will bring peace.

(y) As well to him that is in captivity as to him that remains at home.


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Bibliography
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Isaiah 57:19". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/isaiah-57.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

lips — that is, thanksgivings which flow from the lips. I make men to return thanks to Me (Hosea 14:2; Hebrews 13:15).

Peace, peace — “perfect peace” (see Isaiah 26:3, Margin; John 14:27). Primarily, the cessation of the troubles now afflicting the Jews, as formerly, under the Babylonian exile. More generally, the peace which the Gospel proclaims both to Israel “that is near,” and to the Gentiles who are “far off” (Acts 2:39; Ephesians 2:17).


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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.

Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Isaiah 57:19". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/isaiah-57.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

I create the fruit of the lips; Peace, peace to him that is far off, and to him that is near, saith the LORD; and I will heal him.

I create — I will by my almighty power produce.

Peace — That peace which is not wrought by mens hands, but only by God's lips or word. The doubling of the word signifies the certainty and abundance this peace.

Far off — To the Gentiles who are far from God, as well as to the Jews, who are called a people near unto God, Psalm 148:14.


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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliography
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 57:19". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/isaiah-57.html. 1765.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

19.I create the fruit of the lips. This is an explanation of the former statement, or of the manner in which the Lord will give consolation to this people. It is, because he will promise and offer peace to them; for by “the fruit of the lips” he means that he will cause them to hear the glad tidings of peace, by which they shall be filled with joy.

Peace, peace. I think that he speaks of the publication of “peace,” the ministry of which was committed to the prophets, and was afterwards enjoined on the apostles and the other ministers of the Gospel; as Paul teaches that they “are ambassadors for Christ, to reconcile men to God.” (2 Corinthians 5:20) The repetition of the word “Peace” is intended to express not only certainty, but also uninterrupted continuance. As if he had said, “You now hear nothing but dreadful threatenings. The doctrine of grace and salvation is silent, because you are incapable of it. Such is your obstinacy that I must deal with you by threatenings and terrors. But I will one day restore the doctrine of ‘peace,’ and open the lips of the prophets, that they may proclaim it to you.”

To them that are far off. This is added, because the people who had been carried into captivity did not think that these things belonged to them, (because they were “far off,”) but perhaps to those who were at home; for captivity was a sort of casting off. But the Prophet foretells that, though they are at a great distance, yet they shall be partakers of this grace.

And I heal him. At length he adds the end or effect, that the Lord determines to heal the people; that is, to make them safe and sound. Hence we infer what I remarked a little before, that all that relates to the full and perfect happiness of the Church is absolutely the gift of God.

Paul appears to have glanced at this passage, when he says that Christ

“brought peace to them that are near, and to them that are far off.” (Ephesians 2:17)

He speaks of Gentiles and Jews; for the Jews were “near,” because God had entered into a covenant with them; but the Gentiles were “far off,” because they were strangers to that covenant. But the Prophet appears to speak of Jews only.

I reply, Paul adheres to the true meaning of the Prophet, if the whole be but carefully examined; for the Jews are said, in this passage, to be “far off,” because the Lord appeared to have driven them out of his house; and in that respect they resembled the Gentiles. Since, therefore, at the time of that casting off, there was no difference between them and the Gentiles, Paul, by putting both, as it were, in the same rank, justly placed them on a level with the Jews, and thus applied to them what the Prophet had spoken about the Jews; as, in a manner not unlike, he elsewhere applies to the Gentiles a passage in Hosea. (Romans 9:25; Hosea 1:10)


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Bibliography
Calvin, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 57:19". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/isaiah-57.html. 1840-57.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Isaiah 57:19 I create the fruit of the lips; Peace, peace to [him that is] far off, and to [him that is] near, saith the LORD and I will heal him.

Ver. 19. I create the fruit of the lips,] i.e., I speak peace to my people by the mouths of my faithful ministers, applying and setting home the promises; and this I do most magnificently and mightily.

Peace, peace.] See on Isaiah 26:3.


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Bibliography
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Isaiah 57:19". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/isaiah-57.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Isaiah 57:19. I create the fruit of the lips, &c.— The meaning is, "that God would raise up at this time, by his grace, preachers of the pure and genuine Gospel;" who, after the example of the apostolic times, should powerfully preach that genuine and evangelical truth, which brings peace and tranquillity to troubled consciences, reconciliation of God with the believing sinner, through the blood of Jesus Christ; and is therefore emphatically called, the Gospel of peace. This preaching of theirs should extend far and wide, and should pertain to all people and nations without distinction; and by this means the church should be truly healed and restored. See Ephesians 2:17; Ephesians 6:15.


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Bibliography
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Isaiah 57:19". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/isaiah-57.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

I create, I will by my almighty power and in a wonderful manner produce,

the fruit of the lips; Peace: either,

1. Praise or thanksgiving, which is called the fruit of our lips, Hosea 14:2 Hebrews 13:15, and peace: or rather,

2. That peace which is not wrought by men’s hands, but only by God’s lips or word; peace with God, and in a man’s own conscience, which God hath promised to his people, and which he hath published and offered to all sorts of men by the preaching of the prophets, and especially of the apostles; as may be gathered both from the object of this peace in the following words, and by the exclusion of all wicked men from this peace, Isaiah 57:20 21.

Peace: the doubling of the word signifies the certainty and abundance of this peace.

To him that is far off, and to him that is near; to the Gentiles, who are far from God and from salvation, Acts 2:38,39 Eph 2:12, &c., as well as to the Jews, who are called a people near unto God, Psalms 148:14.


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Bibliography
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Isaiah 57:19". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/isaiah-57.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

19. I create the fruit of the lips — The language of expressive penitence and grateful praise. These are said to come from God as a consequence of this healing, which he doeth.

Peace, peace — He lays striking emphasis on the word peace, because it is real peace, in contrast with that heretofore promised by the false prophets.

To him that is far off — This refers to the dispersed of Israel; possibly, the converted Gentile is also included: both classes, from this time on, are under gospel influences.


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Bibliography
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Isaiah 57:19". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/isaiah-57.html. 1874-1909.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

The result would be that those delivered would praise the Lord. Consequently, there can be peace for the humble because God would heal them, whether they live near in Israel, or far off among the Gentiles (cf. Ephesians 2:17). The duplication of a word like "peace" is a Hebrew idiom for something superlative in kind and total in extent (cf. Isaiah 6:3; Isaiah 21:9; Genesis 14:11; Deuteronomy 16:20; Revelation 14:8; Revelation 18:2). Since shalom was a conventional word of greeting, the speaker may have intended to give the wayward a warm welcome home (cf. John 15:11-24).


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Bibliography
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on Isaiah 57:19". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/isaiah-57.html. 2012.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Lips. Whatever they could ask, so that they might sing canticles. All should be content. He alludes to the liberation of the captives, which was near, and to the redemption of mankind far off. (Calmet)


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Bibliography
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Isaiah 57:19". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/isaiah-57.html. 1859.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

Peace, peace. Figure of speech Epizeuxis, for great emphasis = perfect peace (as in Isaiah 26:3), or great prosperity.


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Bibliography
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Isaiah 57:19". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/isaiah-57.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

I create the fruit of the lips; Peace, peace to him that is far off, and to him that is near, saith the LORD and I will heal him.

I create the fruit of the lips - i:e., thanksgivings, which flow from the lips. I make men to return thanks to me (Hosea 14:2; Hebrews 13:15).

Peace, peace - `perfect peace (see margin, Isaiah 26:3; John 14:27). Primarily, the cessation of the troubles now acting the Jews, as formerly, under the Babylonian exile. More generally, the peace which the Gospel proclaims both to Israel "that is near," and to the Gentiles who are "far off" (Acts 2:39; Ephesians 2:17).


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Bibliography
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Isaiah 57:19". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/isaiah-57.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(19) The fruit of the lips . . .—The words point primarily to the praise and thanksgiving of the pardoned penitent (comp. Hosea 14:2; Hebrews 13:15), but include also all true utterances of the wise of heart (Proverbs 10:31). All these alike have their origin in the creative fiat of Jehovah, which proclaims “peace” (i.e., salvation) to all, whether near or far, Jews in Jerusalem, or Jews in exile, or (as in Ephesians 2:17) the Gentiles whose distance was that of spiritual remoteness. The message of healing is for all.


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Bibliography
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Isaiah 57:19". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/isaiah-57.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

I create the fruit of the lips; Peace, peace to him that is far off, and to him that is near, saith the LORD; and I will heal him.
I create
"The sacrifice of praise," says St. Paul, "is the fruit of the lips." God creates this fruit of the lips, by giving new subject and cause of thanksgiving by His mercies conferred on His people. The great subject of thanksgiving is peace, reconciliation and pardon offered to them that are nigh, and to them that are afar off; not only to the Jew, but also to the Gentile.
the fruit
Exodus 4:11,12; Hosea 14:2; Luke 21:15; Ephesians 6:19; Colossians 4:3,4; Hebrews 13:15
Peace
Matthew 10:13; Mark 16:15; Luke 2:14; 10:5,6; Acts 2:39; 10:36; 2 Corinthians 5:20,21; Ephesians 2:14-17

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Bibliography
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Isaiah 57:19". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/isaiah-57.html.

Commentary by J.C.Philpot on select texts of the Bible

Isaiah 57:19

"Peace, peace to him that is far off." Isaiah 57:19

Far off! What does that mean? It means that the soul passing through that experience is separated, in its feelings, and at an infinite distance from God. Now this inward sense of being "far off" is one of the most painful feelings that a quickened soul can experience. The ungodly, who are really afar off, know nothing experimentally of distance from God, for they have never been brought spiritually near. They have felt no "cords of love, no bands of a man" drawing them with sweet attraction to the throne of the most High; they have never sighed after the sweet manifestations of God"s mercy and love; but they live gladly, and wallow wilfully in those things which separate the soul from its Maker.

But those who are "afar off" in their feelings, are such as have seen something of the beauty of the Lord, and felt the evil of sin, who spiritually know Jehovah"s purity and the creature"s impurity, and have experienced the inward curse, bondage, and condemnation of a holy law. A spiritual discovery of his purity and holiness, making manifest their own vileness, has thrust them down from their self-righteous or presumptuous standing, and made them far off from him; not daring to draw near, nor able to approach; not feeling any spiritual access, but sighing and mourning over their evil hearts in the wilderness, in desolate places; and unable to move a single step forward, because the Lord does not draw them by his smile.

A man must know something experimentally of this before he is brought near. How can we know a feeling of nearness if we have not known a feeling of distance? How can we know what it is to be brought "from the end of the earth" ( Psalm 61:2) by the manifestation of God"s mercy and love, unless we have been driven there, in our feelings, by some manifestation of the wrath of God against sin? But to see the blessed Lord, and not be able to draw near to him; to view his atoning blood at an infinite distance from us, his glorious righteousness well-near out of sight, and his lovely Person out of the reach of our spiritual view, so as not to enjoy any access to these glorious realities—to know this experimentally and feelingly, is to be "far off" from God. And I believe that God"s people know very much of this feeling. There is not much nearness in our day; not much dandling upon the knees, not much smiling upon the soul, not many love visits, nor love tokens communicated. There Isaiah , indeed, a great deal of talking about them; and there are abundance of people who profess to have them; but I fear they are, for the most part, cheats and counterfeits. The real people of God, the true-hearted family are, for the most part, "afar off upon the sea," for it is a dark and cloudy day in which we live.


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Bibliography
Philpot, Joseph Charles. "Commentary on Isaiah 57:19". Commentary by J.C.Philpot on select texts of the Bible. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jcp/isaiah-57.html.

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