Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Job 1:13

Now on the day when his sons and his daughters were eating and drinking wine in their oldest brother's house,
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Job;   Resignation;   Temptation;   Thompson Chain Reference - Job;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Poor;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Animals;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Greatness of God;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Birth-Day;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Job, the Book of;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Birth-Day;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Satan;  
Encyclopedias:
Kitto Biblical Cyclopedia - Birthdays;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Job;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

There was a day - The first day of the week, says the Targum. It no doubt refers to one of those birthday festivals mentioned before.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Job 1:13". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/job-1.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

And there was a day - That is, on the day on which the regular turn came for the banquet to be held in the house of the older brother; compare the notes at Job 1:4.

And drinking wine - This circumstance is omitted in Job 1:4. It shows that wine was regarded as an essential part of the banquet, and it was from its use that Job apprehended the unhappy results referred to in Job 1:5.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Job 1:13". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/job-1.html. 1870.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

RECORD OF THE CALAMITIES THAT BEFELL JOB IN ONE DAY

"And it fell on a day when his sons and his daughters were eating and drinking wine in their eldest brother's house, that there came a messenger unto Job, and said, The oxen were plowing, and the asses feeding beside them; and the Sabeans fell upon them, and took them away; yea, they have slain thy servants with the edge of the sword; and I only am escaped alone to tell thee. While he was yet speaking, there came also another, and said, The fire of God is fallen from heaven, and hath burned up the sheep and the servants, and consumed them; and I only am escaped to tell thee. While he was yet speaking, there came also another, and said, The Chaldeans made three bands, and fell upon the camels, and have taken them away, yea, and slain the servants with the edge of the sword; and I only am escaped alone to tell thee. While he was yet speaking, there came also another, and said, Thy sons and thy daughters were eating and drinking wine in their eldest brother's house; and behold there came a great wind from the wilderness, and smote the four corners of the house, and it fell upon the young men, and they are dead; and I only am escaped to tell thee."

The malignant nature of Satan appears vividly in this passage; and it is fully harmonious with all that is written elsewhere in the Holy Scriptures concerning the evil one. (1) His deception of Eve was designed to accomplish her utter destruction, and to drown all of her posterity for ages to come in oceans of blood and tears. (2) Look what happened to the herd of swine (Matthew 8:32). (3) Look what happened to Judas Iscariot. John 13:27 states that, "After the sop, Satan entered into Judas"; and before the night ended Judas was dead by his own hand. This passage in Job probably was given unto God's people as an accurate portrayal of the deadly purpose of Satan in his activities among the sons of Adam.

THE DISASTERS THAT FELL UPON JOB

A dramatic summary of these is as follows:

* The Sabeans have fallen upon your oxen and asses, killed your servants, and carried away the herds.

* A stroke of lightning has killed all your sheep and the servants that guarded them.

* The Chaldeans have raided your camels, taken them, and murdered your servants.

* A tornado has struck the house where your children were feasting and killed them all.

"What power there is in this passage! If Shakespeare had dramatized it, what a play he would have had."[16] This outdoes the old proverb that, "When it rains, it pours."

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Job 1:13". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/job-1.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And there was a day,.... Which according to the Targum was the first day of the week, but this is not certain, nor material; nor can it be said whether it was the day following that, Satan had leave to do what he would with Job's substance, nor how long this was after that; for though Satan was no doubt eager upon it, and in haste to do mischief; yet besides its requiring some time to get the Sabeans and Chaldeans to march out of their own country into Job's, so he would contrive and fix upon the most proper time to answer his ends and purposes, which was

when his (Job's) sons and daughters were eating, and drinking wine in their eldest brother's house; it should rather be rendered, "in the house of their brother, the firstborn"; that is, of Job; for בכור relates not to brethren, but to parents, as Gussetins observesF2Ebr. Comment. p. 127. : this was either the beginning of a new turn, or rotation of their feasting with each other, which might begin with the elder brother; or this was his birthday; see Job 1:4 and this was the day Satan pitched upon to bring all the following calamities and distresses upon Job; partly that they might fall with the greater weight upon him, and more sensibly affect him, coming upon him while his family was feasting; and while he was pleasing himself with the thoughts of having brought up his children to men's and women's estate, and of the affluent circumstances they were in; and of the unity, harmony, and love that subsisted amongst them, of which their present feasting to gether was a proof; and partly that these afflictions might the more look like the judgments of God upon him, just as the men of the old world were eating and drinking when the flood came and destroyed them all, Luke 17:27 and for the same reasons these were all brought upon him in one day, to crush him the more; and that it might be thought the hand of God was in it, in a way of wrath and vengeance, and so irritate him to curse him to his face, which was what Satan aimed at; see Isaiah 47:8.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Job 1:13". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/job-1.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Job 1:13-22. Job, in affliction, blesses God, etc.

wine — not specified in Job 1:4. The mirth inspired by the “wine” here contrasts the more sadly with the alarm which interrupted it.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 1:13". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/job-1.html. 1871-8.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Job 1:13 And there was a day when his sons and his daughters [were] eating and drinking wine in their eldest brother’s house:

Ver. 13. And there was a day] A dismal day it proved to Job, "a day of trouble and distress, a day of wasteness and desolation, a day of darkness and gloominess, a day of clouds and thick darkness," as Zephaniah 1:15. That subtle serpent set upon mischief, purposely picketh out such a time to do it as wherein such a sad and sudden change was least of all looked for; and then lays on amain (as if he were wood) with the hail shot, hell shot of sharpest afflictions. He knows well, that as mercies and deliverances, the more unexpected they are the more welcome, as Abraham’s receiving his son Isaac after a sort from the dead; Israel’s eduction out of Egypt, when they were forsaken by their hopes; Jonah’s being drawn out of the belly of hell (as he phraseth it, Jonah 2:2); so crosses, the more suddenly they befall men the more they amate them; and finding weak minds secure, they make them miserable, leave them desperate.

When his sons and his daughters were eating and drinking wine] Wherewith, if their hearts were overcharged (and what more easy? the devil foiled our first parents by inordinate appetite, and finding it then so successful a weapon, he maketh use of it still), that day might come upon them unawares, Luke 21:34. That was Satan’s drift surely, however it happened; and so to destroy body and soul together. But it is to be hoped that he was disappointed in his aim; and that death was sent in haste to Job’s children, as an invitant to a better feast; and that they might do as our Saviour did, who being at a feast at Bethany, fell into a meditation and discourse of his death and burial, John 12:7-8. Sure it is, that although the wicked may die sinning, and shall die in their sins, John 5:21, and so be killed with death, as Jezebel’s children were, Revelation 2:23; yet God’s children shall not die before their time, Ecclesiastes 7:17, or till the best time, till their work is done, Revelation 11:7. No malice of man or devil can antedate my end a minute (saith one), while my Master hath work for me to do. It is the happiness of a saint, that he is sure not to die till that time, when as, if he were but rightly informed, he would even desire to die. Happy is he, that after due preparation is passed through the gates of death ere he be aware, as Job’s children were.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Job 1:13". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/job-1.html. 1865-1868.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

13.There was a day — Literally, Now it was the day; the day of festivity, which in the rotation happened to be at the house of the firstborn. On this account it was probably the most marked of all the feasts of the year. It was a feast, too, in which the drinking of wine is specified, to set forth its sumptuousness and hilarity. These two circumstances heighten the precipice down which the family is so soon to be plunged. In the mention of wine-drinking we have, in part, the reason for Job’s anxiety over these festive occasions, and perhaps also the secret of his standing aloof.

Wine-drinking and its drunken effects, even upon women, are portrayed on the monuments of Egypt. The winepresses and offerings of wine to the gods, pictured in the tombs, establish the making of wine as far back as the fourth dynasty, (about 2450 B.C.) This is supposed to be the remotest period from which the manners of the people were thus perpetuated. The culture of the vine was, without doubt, of a vastly greater antiquity, (Genesis 9:20,) as is seen in the exceptional fact that substantially the same word is used for wine among almost all eastern and western nations. The basis of the word is found, according to Pott and Kuhn, in the Indo-European language, the former making it from we, to weave, the latter from wan, to love. Gesenius and Furst, on the other hand, hold that it is of Semitic extraction, and cognate to יין, either from a root signifying “burning,” or another, “to tread out grapes.” The oneness of the word in the Indo-European and Semitic languages may be illustrated by comparing the Greek οινος, originally foinos, the Latin vinum, the Welsh g-win, with the Hebrew yayin, the Arabic wain, (a bunch of grapes,) Ethiopic wain, (wine.)

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Job 1:13". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/job-1.html. 1874-1909.

Mark Dunagan Commentary on the Bible

Satan begins his assaults on the very day when Job"s 10 children were feasting. The Sabeans (suh BEE uhnz), may have been from the region of Sheba in southwest Arabia, or from the town called Sheba, near Dedan, in upper Arabia (Genesis 10:7; 25:3). "The speed with which God allows Satan to afflict Job is surely evidence of God"s complete trust in Job"s integrity and piety" (Strauss p. 8). Notice that when given latitude, Satan is ruthless and can coordinate a very effective assault. He is ruthless and has no concern for innocent human life. Thank God that there is a God to curb this tyrant! The lone remaining witness in verse 15 is often found a number of times in the Old Testament (1 Kings 18:22; Genesis 44:20; 2 Samuel 13:32). This verse refers that evil men become the willing tools of Satan. "Noteworthy is the fact that Satan has no source of evil within Job with which to act. More often than not, our suffering is self-inflicted by our own sin. If Satan had found sin in Job as a weapon to be used, there would have been no Book of Job" (McKenna pp. 40-41).

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Bibliographical Information
Dunagan, Mark. "Commentary on Job 1:13". "Mark Dunagan Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dun/job-1.html. 1999-2014.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

there was a day = the fit, or usual day. When Job was seventy. See notes on p. 666.

wine. Hebrew. yayin. App-27.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Job 1:13". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/job-1.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

And there was a day when his sons and his daughters were eating and drinking wine in their eldest brother's house:

Wine - not specified in Job 1:4. The mirth inspired by the wine here contrasts the more sadly with the alarm which interrupted it.

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 1:13". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/job-1.html. 1871-8.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

And there was a day when his sons and his daughters were eating and drinking wine in their eldest brother's house:
when
4; Proverbs 27:1; Ecclesiastes 9:12; Luke 12:19,20; 17:27-29; 21:34
Reciprocal: Job 1:18 - Thy sons;  Job 9:23 - If the;  Job 15:21 - in prosperity;  Job 16:11 - to the ungodly;  Job 19:10 - destroyed;  Matthew 8:32 - the whole

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Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Job 1:13". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/job-1.html.