Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Job 1:22

Through all this Job did not sin nor did he blame God.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Afflictions and Adversities;   Faithfulness;   Job;   Resignation;   Temptation;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Afflicted Saints;  
Dictionaries:
Bridgeway Bible Dictionary - Poor;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Communion (2);   Greatness of God;   Humility;   Patience;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Humility;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Job, the Book of;   The Hawker's Poor Man's Concordance And Dictionary - Satan;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Fool;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

In all this Job sinned not - He did not give way to any action, passion, or expression, offensive to his Maker. He did not charge God with acting unkindly towards him, but felt as perfectly satisfied with the privation which the hand of God had occasioned, as he was with the affluence and health which that hand had bestowed. This is the transaction that gave the strong and vivid colouring to the character of Job; in this, and in this alone, he was a pattern of patience and resignation. In this Satan was utterly disappointed; he found a man who loved his God more than his earthly portion. This was a rare case, even in the experience of the devil. He had seen multitudes who bartered their God for money, and their hopes of blessedness in the world to come for secular possessions in the present. He had been so often successful in this kind of temptation, that he made no doubt he should succeed again. He saw many who, when riches increased, set their hearts on them, and forgot God. He saw many also who, when deprived of earthly comforts, blasphemed their Maker. He therefore inferred that Job, in similar circumstances, would act like the others; he was disappointed. Reader, has he, by riches or poverty, succeeded with thee? Art thou pious when affluent, and patient and contented when in poverty?

That Job lived after the giving of the law, seems to me clear from many references to the rites and ceremonies instituted by Moses. In Job 1:5, we are informed that he sanctified his children, and offered burnt-offerings daily to the morning for each of them. This was a general ordinance of the law, as we may see, Leviticus 9:7; : "Moses said unto Aaron, Go unto the altar, and offer thy sin-offering and thy burnt-offering, and make an atonement for thyself and for the people." Leviticus 9:22; : "And Aaron lifted up his hands towards the people, and blessed them, and came down from offering the burnt-offering."

This sort of offering, we are told above, Job offered continually; and this also was according to the law, Exodus 29:42; : "This shall be a continual burnt-offering throughout your generations." See also Numbers 28:3, Numbers 28:6, Numbers 28:10, Numbers 28:15, Numbers 28:24, Numbers 28:31.

This custom was observed after the captivity, Ezra 3:5; : "They offered the continual burnt-offering: and of every one that offered a freewill-offering." See also Nehemiah 10:33. Ezekiel, who prophesied during the captivity, enjoins this positively, Ezekiel 46:13-15; : "Thou shalt daily prepare a burnt-offering unto the Lord; thou shalt prepare it every morning."

Job appears to have thought that his children might have sinned through ignorance, or sinned privately; and it was consequently necessary to make the due sacrifices to God in order to prevent his wrath and their punishment; he therefore offered the burnt-offering, which was prescribed by the law in cases of sins committed through ignorance. See the ordinances Leviticus 4:1-35; Leviticus 5:15-19, and particularly Numbers 15:24-29. I think it may be fairly presumed that the offerings which Job made for his children were in reference to these laws.

The worship of the sun, moon, and stars, as being the most prevalent and most seductive idolatry, was very expressly forbidden by the law, Deuteronomy 4:19; : "Take heed, lest thou lift up thine eyes to heaven; and when thou seest the sun, and the moon, and the stars, even all the host of heaven, shouldest be driven to worship them, and serve them." Job purges himself from this species of idolatry, Job 31:26-28; : "If I beheld the sun when it shined, or the moon walking in brightness, and my heart hath been secretly enticed, or my mouth hath kissed my hand: this also were an iniquity to be punished by the judge; for I should have denied the God that is above."

He clears himself also from adultery in reference to the law enacted against that sin, Job 31:9-12; : "If mine heart have been deceived by a woman, or if I have laid wait at my neighbor's door; then let my wife grind to another: for this is a heinous crime; yea, it is an iniquity to be punished by the judges." See the law against this sin, Exodus 20:14, Exodus 20:17; : "Thou shalt not commit adultery: thou shalt not covet thy neighbor's wife." Leviticus 20:10; : "The man that committeth adultery with another man's wife shall surely be put to death;" see Deuteronomy 22:22. And for the judge's office in such cases, see Deuteronomy 17:9-12; : "Thou shalt come unto the priests and Levites, and unto the judge that shall be in those days; and they shall show thee the sentence of judgment." 1 Samuel 2:25; : "If one man sin against another, the judge shall judge him."

The following will, I think, be considered an evident allusion to the passage of the Red Sea, and the destruction of the proud Egyptian king: Job 26:11, Job 26:12; : "The pillars of heaven tremble, and are astonished at his reproof. He divideth the sea with his power; and by his understanding he smiteth through the proud." These, with several others that might be adduced, are presumptive proofs that the writer of this book lived after the giving and establishment of the law, if not much later, let Job himself live when he might. See other proofs in the notes.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Job 1:22". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/job-1.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

In all this - In all his feelings and expressions on this occasion.

Job sinned not - He expressed just the feelings and manifested just the submission which he ought to do.

Nor charged God foolishly - Margin, “Attributed folly to God.” Vulgate, “Neither did he speak any foolish thing against God.” The Septuagint renders it, “and he did not impute (or give, ἐδωκεν edōken ) folly ( ἀφροσύνην aphrosunēn ) (indiscretion, ‹Thompson‘) to God.” Good renders this, “nor vented a murmur against God;” and remarks that the literal rendering would be, “nor vented froth against God. Tindal renders it, “nor murmured foolishly against God.” The Hebrew word תפלה tı̂phlâh is derived from the obsolete root תפל tâphêl “to spit out;” and hence, to be insipid, tasteless, not seasoned. The noun, therefore, means properly that which is spit out; then that which is insipid or tasteless; and then folly. Wit and wisdom are represented by Oriental writers as pungent and seasoned; compare the expression among the Greeks of “Attic salt,” meaning wit or wisdom. The word “folly” in the Scriptures often means wickedness, for this is supreme folly. Here it has this sense, and means that Job did not say anything “wrong.” Satan was disappointed and had borne a false accusation before God. He did “not” charge God foolishly, and he did “not” curse him to his face.

From this instructive narrative of the manner in which Job received afflictions, we may learn

(1) That true piety will bear the removal of property and friends without murmuring. Religion is not based on such things, and their removal cannot shake it. It is founded deeper in the soul, and mere external changes cannot destroy it.

(2) When we are afflicted, we should not vent our wrath on winds and waves; on the fraud and perfidy of our fellow-men; on embarrassments and changes in the commercial world; on the pestilence and the storm. Any or all of these may be employed as instruments in taking away our property or our friends, but we should trace the calamity ultimately to God. Storms and winds and waves, malignant spirits and our fellow-men, do no more than God permits. They are all restrained and kept within proper limits. They are not directed by chance, but they are under the control of an intelligent Being, and are the wise appointment of a holy God.

(3) God has a right to remove our comforts. He gave them - not to be our permanent inheritance, but to be withdrawn when he pleases. It is a proof of goodness that we have been permitted to tread his earth so long - though we should be allowed to walk it no more; to breathe his air so long - though we should be permitted to inhale it no more; to look upon his sun and moon and stars so long - though we should be permitted to walk by their light no more; to enjoy the society of the friends whom he has given us so long - though we should enjoy that society no longer. A temporary gift may be removed at the pleasure of the giver, and we hold all our comforts at the mere good pleasure of God.

(4) We see the nature of true resignation. It is not because we can always see the “reason” why we are afflicted; it consists in bowing to the will of a holy and intelligent God, and in the feeling that he has a “right” to remove what he has given us. It is his; and may be taken away when he pleases. It may be, and should be yielded, without a complaint - and to do this “because” God wills it, is true resignation.

(5) We see the true source of “comfort” in trials. It is not in the belief that things are regulated by chance and hap-hazard; or even that they are controlled by physical laws. We may have the clearest philosophical view of the mode in which tempests sweep away property, or the pestilence our friends; we may understand the laws by which all this is done, but this affords no consolation. It is only when we perceive an “intelligent Being” presiding over these events, and see that they are the result of plan and intention on his part, that we can find comfort in trial. What satisfaction is it for me to understand the law by which fire burns when my property is swept away; or to know “how” disease acts on the human frame when my child dies; or how the plague produces its effects on the body when friend after friend is laid in the grave? This is “philosophy;” and this is the consolation which this world furnishes. I want some higher consolation than that which results from the knowledge of unconscious laws. I want to have the assurance that it is the result of intelligent design, and that this design is connected with a benevolent end - and that I find only in religion.

(6) We see the “power” of religion in sustaining in the time of trial. How calm and submissive was this holy man! How peaceful and resigned! Nothing else but piety could have done this. Philosophy blunts the feelings, paralyses the sensibilities, and chills the soul; but it does not give consolation. It is only confidence in God; a feeling that he is right; and a profound and holy acquiescence in his will, that can produce support in trials like these. This we may have as well so Job; and this is indispensable in a world so full of calamity and sorrow as this is.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Bibliographical Information
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Job 1:22". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/job-1.html. 1870.

The Biblical Illustrator

Job 1:22

In all this Job sinned not.

Pious resignation

“In all this Job sinned not, nor charged God foolishly.”

I. Consider the nature of pious resignation to the will of God, in His afflictive dispensations towards us, as represented in what Job did upon the present occasion. The greatest favourites of heaven are often the subjects of the severest afflictions. Not only is affliction the common lot of all men, but adversity may be a greater token of the Divine favour and love than prosperity itself. Of Job it is said, “he arose”; that is, he did not sink under his afflictions so as to forget himself. He rose from his seat with all the dignity of true religion and heavenly composure of mind. He “rent his mantle.” An outward sign, in Eastern countries, of great distress, or of indignation. Thus Job testified the greatness of his sorrow and the depths of his humiliation as a sinful creature. “Shaved his head,” another expression of uncommon distress. “Tell down upon the ground,” bowing lowly and prostrate before the Majesty of heaven, with entire submission to the Divine will. “And worshipped,” not in appearance only, but in heart. So we see that pious resignation does not consist in the stupid insensibility of the hard hearted, nor in the monkish apathy of the Stoic; for there is neither virtue nor grace in bearing what we do not feel; and no chastening is for the present joyous, but grievous. People may suffer very much under their afflictions, and feel them very deeply, and be resigned to the will of God at the same time. Neither is an earnest desire to have our affliction removed inconsistent with the nature of holy submission. We may weep and mourn, and betray our inward distress by our outward emotions and conduct, and still be unfeignedly submissive to the will of God. External agitations are, in some cases, the almost unavoidable effect of strong natural affections. Insensibility, so far from being the ornament, is the disgrace of human nature.

II. A peculiar privilege of God’s people under His afflicting hand, which is exhibited to us in what Job said. “Naked came!” etc. Here is an interpretation of the true state of his mind, as evidential of a most excellent frame of heart. It is recorded to teach us what is our duty as creatures, and what is our privilege as Christians, if indeed we be partakers of the saving grace of God. Every good thing we have is the undeserved gift of God, to be received with gratitude, thanksgiving, and love, and to be sanctified by the Word of God and prayer. It is not only our duty to justify the Lord in all His afflictive dispensations towards us; it is our privilege to praise God for them, and even bless Him for our afflictions. They will then prove unspeakable blessings to us.

III. A testimony by the Holy Ghost himself concerning the great excellency of patient resignation. “In all this,” etc. In all the behaviour of this servant of the Lord he acted not only like a man, but like a wise man, and like a holy man, a man of God. It was not his natural fortitude and courage, nor the strength of reason and argument that supported him, but the superior power of faith in. God, the nobler principle of Divine grace. He did not utter a repining word, entertain a hard thought, nor discover a fretful and impatient spirit. He neither arraigned the justice nor indicted the goodness of God, but acknowledged his own unworthiness and the Divine Sovereignty; confessed his obligations to his great Benefactor, and His undisputable right to do what He would with His own. Remember, then, that the Lord doth not willingly grieve nor afflict the children of men. Afflictions are always dealt out in number, weight, and measure. When the end in view is answered they will be removed. We should be more anxious to have our afflictions sanctified than taken away. Beware of the evil of impatience, murmuring, and discontent. Why should a living man complain, a man for the punishment of his sins? (C. de Coetlogon.)

Charging God foolishly

The two opposite states of prosperity and adversity equally require our vigilance and caution; each of them is a state of conflict, in which nothing but unwearied resistance can preserve us from being overcome. There is no crime more incident to those whose life is embittered with calamities, and whom afflictions have reduced to gloominess and melancholy, than that of repining at the determinations of Providence, or of “charging God foolishly.” They are often tempted to unseemly inquiries into the reasons of His dispensations, and to expostulations about the justice of that sentence which condemned them to their present sufferings. They consider the lives of those whom they account happier than themselves with an eye of malice and suspicion, and if they find them no better than their own, think themselves almost justified in murmuring at their own state. The unreasonableness of this may be seen by--

I. Considering the attributes of God. Many of the errors of mankind, both in opinion and practice, arise originally from mistaken notions of the Divine Being. It is frequently observed in common life, that some favourite notion or inclination, long indulged, takes such an entire possession of a man’s mind, and so engrosses his faculties, as to mingle thoughts perhaps he is not himself conscious of with almost all his conceptions, and influence his whole behaviour. The two great attributes of our Sovereign Creator which seem most likely to influence our lives are His justice and His mercy. The justice of God will not permit Him to afflict any man without cause. Whether we suppose ourselves to suffer for the sake of punishment or probation, it is not easy to discover with what right we repine. If our pains and labours be only preparatory to unbounded felicity we ought to rejoice and be exceeding glad, and to glorify the goodness of God, who, by uniting us in the sufferings with saints and martyrs, will join us also in our reward. Since God is just, a man may be sure that there is a reason for his misery, and it will be generally found in his own corruption. He will therefore, instead of murmuring at God, begin to examine himself, and when he has found the depravity of his own manners it is more likely that he will admire the mercy than complain of the severity of his Judge. Then we may think of God not only as Governor, but as Father of the universe, a Being infinitely gracious, whose punishments are not inflicted to gratify any passion of anger or revenge, but to awaken us from the lethargy of sin, and to recall us from the paths of destruction. A constant conviction of the mercy of God firmly implanted in our minds will, upon the first attack of any calamity, easily induce us to reflect that it is permitted by God to fall upon us, lest we should be too much enamoured by our present state, and neglect to extend our prospects into eternity. Thus by familiarising to our minds the attributes of God we shall, in a great measure, secure ourselves against any temptation to repine at His arrangements, but shall probably still more strengthen our resolution and confirm our piety by reflecting.

II. By reflecting on the ignorance of man. It is by comparing ourselves with others that we often make an estimate of our own happiness, and even sometimes of our virtue. He that has more than he deserves is not to murmur merely because he has less than another. When we judge so confidently of others we deceive ourselves, we admit conjectures for certainties, and chimeras for realities. No man can say that he is better than another, because no man can tell how far the other Was enabled to resist temptation, or what incidents might concur to overthrow his virtue. Let everyone, then, whom God shall visit with affliction humble himself before Him with steady confidence in His mercy, and unfeigned submission to His justice. Let him remember that his sins are the cause of his miseries, and apply himself seriously to the great work of self-examination and repentance. (S. Johnson, LL. D.)

Job’s first victory

They are indeed conquerors under trouble who are kept free from sin and provocation in their hour of trial. For this was Job’s victory, that in all this Job sinned not. Albeit troubles do suggest temptations to many sins; yet the great sin to be avoided by the godly under trouble is, misconstructing of God and His dealing. Misconstructions of God do both reflect upon the infinite wisdom and deep counsels of God in ordering the lots of His people. And they also do proclaim their own folly, in their want of skill to judge aright of God’s proceeding, and in following a course which may well vex themselves, but cannot profit them at all. Whatever advantage saints do give to Satan over themselves in an hour of trial, yet by the power of grace they may be enabled so to walk as may refute all his calumnies of them, and make him a liar; even as God in the issue will, once for all, wipe off all the aspersions which Satan casts upon His followers. As God doth always take notice of His people’s carriage so especially under trouble; and whoever so keep their feet in time of trial, they are observed and commended by God. Saints ought not to measure God’s approbation of their way under trouble by any present comfortable issue; seeing the Lord may take notice of and commend the integrity of those whom yet He seeth is not fit to deliver: for Job is here commended, while the trial is not only continued, but growing upon him. (George Hutcheson.)

Patient Job and the baffled enemy

That is to say, in all this trial, and under all this temptation, Job kept right with God. During all the losses of his estate, and the deaths of his children, he did not speak in an unworthy manner. The text speaks admiringly of “all this”; and a great “all” it was. Some of you are in troubles many; but what are they compared with those of Job? Your afflictions are molehills contrasted with the Alps of the patriarch’s grief. Ah, if God could uphold Job in all this, you may be sure that He can support you. “All this” also alludes to all that Job did, and thought, and said. If in patience he can possess his soul when all the arrows of affliction are wounding him, he is a man indeed. May we ourselves so live that it may be said of us in the end, “In all this he sinned not. He swam through a sea of trouble.”

I. In all our affairs the main thing is, not to sin. It is not said, “In all this Job was never spoken against,” for he was spoken against by Satan in the presence of himself; and very soon he was falsely accused by men who should have comforted him. You must not expect that you will pass through this world, and have it said of you in the end, “In all this no one ever spoke against him.” Those who secure zealous lovers are pretty sure to call forth intense adversaries. The trimmer may dodge through the world without much censure; but it will seldom be so with an out-and-out man of God. Neither is it a chief point for us to seek to go through life without suffering, since the Lord’s servants, the best of them, are ripened and mellowed by suffering. Remember, if the grace of God prevents our affliction from driving us into sin, then Satan is defeated. Satan did not care what Job suffered, so long as he could but hope to make him sin; and he was foiled when he did not sin. If you conquer him in your hour of grief, you conquer indeed. If you do not sin while under the stress of heavy trouble, God will be honoured. He is not so much glorified by preserving you from trouble, as by upholding you in trouble. He allows you to be tried that His grace in you may be tested and glorified. Remember, furthermore, that if you do not sin, you yourself will be no loser by all your tribulations. Sin alone can injure you; but if you remain steadfast, though you are stripped, you will be clothed with glory; though you are deprived of comfort, you will lose no real blessing. True, it may not seem a pleasant thing to be stripped, and yet if one is soon going to bed, it is of no great consequence.

II. In all time of trial there is special fear of our sinning. It is well for the child of God to remember that the hour of darkness is an hour of danger. Suffering is fruitful soil for certain forms of sin. Hence it was needful for the Holy Spirit to give a testimony to Job that, “In all this he sinned not.”

1. For instance, we are apt to grow impatient.

2. We are even tempted to rebellion against God.

3. We may also sin by despair. An afflicted on said, I shall never look up again. I shall go mourning all my days.” Come, if you are as poor as Job, be as patient as Job, and you will find hope ever shining like a star which never sets.

4. Many sin by unbelieving speeches.

5. Men have been driven into a kind of atheism by successive troubles. They have wickedly argued--“There cannot be a God, or He would not let me suffer so.”

III. In acts of mourning we need not sin. Hearken: you are allowed to weep. You are allowed to show that you suffer by your losses. See what Job did. “Job arose, and rent his mantle, and shaved his head, and fell down upon the ground, and worshipped”; and “in all this Job sinned not.” The husband lamented sorely when his beloved was taken from him. He was right. I should have thought far less of him if he had not done so. “Jesus wept.” But there is a measure in the expression of grief. Job was not wrong in rending his garment: he might have been wrong if he had torn it into shreds. Do not restrain the boiling floods. A flood of tears without may assuage the deluge of grief within. Job’s acts of mourning were moderate and seemly--toned down by his faith. Job’s words also, though very strong, were very true: “Naked came I out of my mother’s womb, and naked shall I return thither.” Job mourned, and yet did not sin; for he mourned, and worshipped as he mourned. Remember, then, that in acts of mourning there is not, of necessity, any sin.

IV. In charging God foolishly we sin greatly. “Job sinned not,” and the phrase which explains it is, “nor charged God foolishly.”

I. Here let me say that to call God to our judgment seat at all is a high crime and misdemeanour. “Nay but, O man, who art thou that repliest against God?”

2. In the next place, we sin in requiring that we should understand God. What? Is God under bonds to explain Himself to us?

3. We charge God foolishly when we imagine that He is unjust. “Ah!” said one, “when I was a worldling I prospered; but ever since I have been a Christian I have endured no end of losses and troubles.” Do you mean to insinuate that the Lord does not treat you justly? Think a minute, and stand corrected. If the Lord were to deal with you according to strict justice, where would you be?

4. Some, however, will bring foolish charges against His love.

5. Alas! at times, unbelief charges God foolishly with reference to His power. We think that He cannot help us in some peculiar trial.

6. We may be so foolish as to doubt His wisdom. If He be All-wise, how can He suffer us to be in such straits, and to sink so low as we do? What folly is this I Who art thou, that thou wouldst measure the wisdom of God?

V. To come through great trial without sin is the honour of the saints. There is no glory in being a feather-bed soldier, a man bedecked with gorgeous regimentals, but never beautified by a sear, or ennobled by a wound. All that you ever hear of such a soldier is that his spurs jingle on the pavement as he walks. There is no history for this carpet knight. He never smelt gunpowder in his life; or if he did, he fetched out his scent bottle to kill the offensive odour. Well, that will not make much show in the story of the nations. If we could have our choice, and we were as wise as the Lord Himself, we should choose the troubles which He has appointed us, and we should not spare ourselves a single pang. Who wants to paddle about a duck pond all his life? Nay, Lord, if Thou wilt bid me go upon the waters, let me launch out into the deep. The honour of a Christian, or, let me say, the honour of God’s grace in a Christian, is when we have so acted that we have obeyed in detail, not forgetting any point of duty. “In all this Job sinned not” neither in what he thought, or said, or did; nor even in what he did not say, and did not do: I feel that I must add just this. As I read the verse through, it looked too dry for me, and so I wetted it with a tear. “In all this Job sinned not, nor charged God foolishly”; and yet I, who have suffered so little, have often sinned, and, I fear, in times of anguish, have charged God foolishly. Is not this true of some of you? (C. H. Spurgeon.)
.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Exell, Joseph S. "Commentary on "Job 1:22". The Biblical Illustrator. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tbi/job-1.html. 1905-1909. New York.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

In all this Job sinned not,.... Not that he was without sin, he was conscious to himself of it, and owns it, Job 9:20; but in all the above things he did or said he sinned not; not in his rending his garments, in shaving his head, and laying himself prostrate on the ground, which were done as common usages in such cases, and not through excess of passion; nor in anything that dropped from his lips, which were ill-becoming the character he bore as a religious man; and though he might be guilty of some failings and imperfections, as the best of men are, even in doing the best of things, yet he sinned not that sin the devil said he would, that is, curse God to his face; there was nothing of this, nor like it, but the reverse of it in all he said and did:

nor charged God foolishly: or "gave not folly to him"F13ולא נתן תפלה και ουκ εδωκεν αφροσυνην, Sept. "nec attribuit insulsitatem", Junius & Tremellius, Piscator, Drusius. ; did not ascribe it to him, did not arraign his wisdom, nor charge him with folly; though there might be some things he could not account for, or see into the reasons of them, he knew the Lord could; he considered that he was a God of knowledge, the only and all wise God, and did all things after the counsel of his will, and to answer the best ends and purposes, and therefore he submitted all to his wisdom; nor did he himself speak foolishly of him, arraigning his justice and holiness, as if he had done wrong to him; he knew there was no unrighteousness in God, nor in any of his ways and works, and that he had a right to do what he would with his own, to give and take it away at his pleasure: he spoke nothing that was "unsavoury"F14תפלה "insulsum", Pagninus, Montanus, Vatablus, Bolducius. , as the word signifies; nothing contrary to right reason and true religion; nothing unsuitable unto, or unbecoming him as a man, as a religious man, as in connection with God, a servant of his, and one that feared him. The Arabic version is, "nor blasphemed God"; and the Targum,

neither did he set in order words of blasphemy before God; he did not curse God, as Satan said he would, neither in heart and thought, nor in words; this is a testimony of him given by the Lord himself, the searcher of hearts, and who only could give such a testimony of him; and which, as Cocceius observes, is a proof of the divine authority of this book.

Copyright Statement
The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Job 1:22". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/job-1.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

In all this Job sinned not, nor charged God d foolishly.

(d) But declared that God did all things according to justice and equity.
Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Job 1:22". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/job-1.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

nor charged God foolishly — rather, “allowed himself to commit no folly against God” [Umbreit]. Job 2:10 proves that this is the meaning. Not as Margin “attributed no folly to God.” Hasty words against God, though natural in the bitterness of grief, are folly; literally, an “insipid, unsavory” thing (Job 6:6; Jeremiah 23:13, Margin). Folly in Scripture is continually equivalent to wickedness. For when man sins, it is himself, not God, whom he injures (Proverbs 8:36). We are to submit to trials, not because we see the reasons for them, nor yet as though they were matters of chance, but because God wills them, and has a right to send them, and has His own good reasons in sending them.

Copyright Statement
These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 1:22". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/job-1.html. 1871-8.

Keil & Delitzsch Old Testament Commentary

22 In all this Job sinned not, nor attributed folly to God.

In all this, i.e., as the lxx correctly renders it: which thus far had befallen him; Ewald et al. translate incorrectly: he gave God no provocation. תּפלה signifies, according to Job 24:12, comp. Job 6:6, saltlessness and tastelessness, dealing devoid of meaning and purpose, and is to be translated either, he uttered not, non edidit, anything absurd against God, as Jerome translates, neque stultum quid contra Deum locutus est ; or, he did not attribute folly to God: so that נתן ל are connected, as Psalms 68:35; Jeremiah 13:16. Since נתן by itself nowhere signifies to express, we side with Hirzel and Schlottm. against Rödiger (in his Thes .) and Oehler, in favour of the latter. The writer hints that, later on, Job committed himself by some unwise thoughts of the government of God.

Copyright Statement
The Keil & Delitzsch Old Testament Commentary is a derivative of a public domain electronic edition.
Bibliographical Information
Keil, Carl Friedrich & Delitzsch, Franz. "Commentary on Job 1:22". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/kdo/job-1.html. 1854-1889.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

In all this Job sinned not, nor charged God foolishly.

Charged — Heb. not imputed folly to God; so far was he from blaspheming God, that he did not entertain any dishonourable thought of God, as if he had done anything unworthy of his infinite wisdom, or justice, or goodness, but heartily acquiesced in his good pleasure, and in his righteous though sharp proceedings against him. Discontent and impatience do in effect impute folly to God. Against the workings of these we should carefully watch, acknowledging that God has done well, but we have done foolishly.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Job 1:22". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/job-1.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Job 1:22 In all this Job sinned not, nor charged God foolishly.

Ver. 22. In all this Job sinned not] The Greek and Latin versions add here, with his lips; but I could rather be of Mercer’s judgment, who referreth the former part of this verse to the mind, and the latter to the mouth (Beza.); showing that Job neither thought in his heart, nor uttered with his mouth, anything unsuitable and unworthy of God, insomuch, that both within and without he carried away the victory and conquest over Satan, and so better deserved to be sainted than our Henry VI, of whom the chronicler writeth thus: The king in both estates so demeaned himself, that he modestly carried the one, and moderately underwent the other; yea, such was his deportment, that the inconstancy of his state could not alter the constancy of his mind; insomuch that one of his successors, King Henry VII, laboured for that only virtue, to have him canonized for a saint; and had obtained to have done it, had not the charges thereof so far exceeded mediocrity, as to cause him to leave it undone (Dan. Hist. contin. by Trussel). God himself hath here canonized, crowned, and chronicled holy Job, for his many good properties before, and here for his humility and patience. The trial of his faith, being much more precious than that of gold that perisheth, though it be tried with fire, is found to praise and honour and glory, 1 Peter 1:7. It was a saying of Philostratus, that one Jupiter set out by Homer, the poet, was worth ten set out by Phydias, the carver; because the former flew abroad through all the world; whereas the other never stirred from his pedestal at Athens: so one Job, thus renowned by God’s own pen, is far beyond all that have been memorized in human histories for their equanimity and constancy. In all this that Job suffered, acted, and uttered, he sinned not, sc. sinningly; he was not transformed into sin’s image; he sinned not by cursing God, as Satan hoped, and would have had it; or charged God foolishly, or with folly; with anything insolent, insulse, unsavoury; he charged him not in the least, to have dealt unwisely or unworthily with him; and this is here mentioned, as grace, almost to a miracle, as patience having her perfect work, and proving Job to be perfect and entire, wanting nothing, James 1:4.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Job 1:22". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/job-1.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Job 1:22. Nor charged God foolishly Nor spoke any thing inconsiderately against God. Houbigant. Any thing unreasonable or absurd against God. Heath.

REFLECTIONS.—We have here, 1st, the character and greatness of that venerable patriarch Job.

1. His pity was remarkable and eminent; and the more so, probably, because of the generally abounding wickedness. He was a perfect man, not in an absolute sense; but accepted in the Saviour, and holy and sanctified in heart before him. No allowed guile was entertained within, or known evil indulged in his conversation: one that feared God, continually influenced by a regard to his holy will, and diligently engaged in the exercises of his worship; and eschewed evil, or departed from evil, as abominable in the sight of God, and carefully abstained not only from the open acts, but from the appearances of evil.

2. His prosperity was as singular as his piety. His children were numerous, his household large, and his substance vast in flocks and herds, wherein at that time the riches of men consisted; so that in all the east there was none so great as Job. Note; (1.) Though it is not common, it is not impossible, to be very great and very good; abounding in the riches of the world, yet more with riches of grace from heaven. (2.) Worldly possessions are then valuable blessings, when in their hands who study to make them subservient to the interests of God, and the good of mankind.

2nd, Of his children. Though children are generally coveted among the first blessings, yet it is their conduct and behaviour that stamp them with real value; else they are troubles instead of comforts. Job had not only a pleasing number of both sexes, but,

1. He saw all his sons happily settled in the world; and, though each had his separate family, yet they lived together in that harmony which is so desirable among brethren. At stated times they visited each other in turn, and invited their sisters to join in their entertainment. Note; (1.) There is no evil in entertaining our friends, while in the fear and love of God we eat our bread with a cheerful heart. (2.) Brethren and near relations are especially bound to cultivate mutual love.

2. He continued to watch over them with pious care and holy jealousy, and they continued to pay him all dutiful respect and submission, and readily joined with him in his solemn exercises of devotion. When, therefore, the days of their feasting were ended, fearing lest in the midst of youthful mirth they had sinned, and some irregularity might have been committed; or cursed God in their hearts, that is, had entertained some unbecoming apprehension of God or of his providence, or been guilty of some neglect in their religious services; he sends to sanctify them, enjoins them to prepare for the sacrifice he was about to offer in their behalf; to examine themselves, and, seriously reflecting on the past days, to bring their humble confessions before the God of mercy, and lay their sins on the head of the beast, the type and figure of that one great sacrifice which should be offered for the sins of the world. Accordingly, early in the morning he arose, and offered for each a sacrifice of atonement; while they attended, and joined in the holy worship, expecting remission of sin through the atoning blood: and thus did Job continually, or every year, after every close of their annual circuit of entertainment: a remarkable instance of his paternal care and sincere godliness, and an evidence also of the true seriousness of his children, who so readily joined in the sacred service. Note; (1.) In the midst of feasting we are in danger of forgetting God and godliness, and need a double guard over our hearts. (2.) Job's example should be every parent's pattern; not rigidly severe, yet watchfully jealous over their children for good. (3.) They who serve God truly, serve him continually. (4.) We see from the beginning, that one grand point of true religion consisted in the vicarious substitution of the beast for the sinner, as pointing to the great atonement. The gospel thus was preached to them, even as unto us, according to their dispensation.

3rdly, We have seen Job great and good, and, to appearance, most firmly established; but this is a changing world, and nothing is certain to us beneath the sun. His piety and prosperity could not but provoke the envy of the devil, who waited impatiently for an occasion to gratify his malice upon this holy man. We have here,

1. Satan appearing among the sons of God. Some think that this is to be understood of God's people at their solemn seasons of devotion; for, even in their assemblies, the devil, who is yet permitted to range about the earth, finds a place, and watches, seeking whom he may devour: but my judgment on this point is different, as I have shewn before in the critical annotations.

2. God's inquiry, whence he came: not as unacquainted with his walks or designs, but as resenting his bold intrusion; or to lead him to what he saw was his malicious purpose concerning Job.

3. Satan's answer; which may be construed as the boast of pride, as though the earth were his own, and he stalked over the vast circumference, as a king in progress through his dominions; or it may refer to his restless misery, which suffers him nowhere to find ease; or to his indefatigable diligence in his hellish work of tempting and destroying the sons of men. Note; There is one who ever wakes and watches, and no time or place is secure from his snares: how wakeful then and watchful should we be, that we enter not into temptation!

4. God questions him concerning Job. Hast thou considered my servant Job, observed his piety, or set thine heart upon him, to do him some mischief? I know thou hast. God calls him my servant, the most honourable of all titles, and expressive of his high approbation of Job's fidelity in his service: that there is none like him in the earth; not only in the land of Uz, but probably among the sons of men, his fellow was not found for true piety; a perfect and an upright man, one that feareth God and escheweth evil. Such a character could not but awaken Satan's malice, and God knew what was his present design upon him. Note; (1.) God knows all the devices of the wicked one, and is able to disappoint them. (2.) They who approve themselves faithful servants to him, will find him a faithful God to them, to preserve them from the snares of the devil.

5. Satan's base insinuation and proposal. He had nothing whereof to accuse him; his character was allowedly sincere and upright; but, by a sly interrogation, Doth Job fear God for nought? he would insinuate, that his views were mercenary, and his service at bottom hypocritical. He enumerates, with a kind of envious grief, the many and singular mercies that he enjoyed; and therefore would infer, that if Job did serve God, he was well paid for it; but let God strip him of his worldly comforts, and he would soon see an alteration: He will curse thee to thy face. Such a severe trial Satan hoped would shake his fidelity; at least, his own malice would be gratified in Job's misery. Note; (1.) The commendations of others in the ears of envy grate harsh discord. (2.) Worldly ends and mercenary motives are still made, by Satan's instruments, the accusations against those whose conduct admits no evil thing justly to be said of them. They cannot prove them vile like themselves, therefore they will call them hypocrites. (3.) A sly question often conveys the vilest insinuation. (4.) They who use imprecations and oaths in common, shew with what master they have been, though even the devil here speaks with more reserve than many profane swearers, who openly blaspheme God, and invocate horrid vengeance on their souls.

6. God permits the trial that he suggested; all that he hath is in thy power. And this he does, not to gratify Satan's malice, or as doubting of Job's integrity; but to confound the devil, to make Job's graces appear more eminent, and to glorify the greatness of his own power and love in his support and salvation. Only upon himself put not forth thine hand. The devil's power is limited: He who permits his wickedness saith to him, Thitherto mayest thou go, but no farther; and this should ever encourage the children of God against despair.

7. Satan immediately proceeds to put in force the permission that he had received; eager to do mischief, and hoping, it may be, to prevail against this holy man, who sat secure, and little apprehended the impending storm. Note; Every moment we are in jeopardy, nor can foresee what is plotting against us by the prince of the power of the air.

4thly, We have,

1. The deceitful calm which preceded the terrible storm. The days of feasting were begun, the tillage going forward, the cattle grazing in fat pastures, and peace and prosperity seemed to reign in all Job's house. Note; In our happiest estate we had need ever rejoice with trembling.

2. The sudden storm arises, and successive messengers bring the most doleful tidings, each on the other's heels pursuing, till the last completes the wretched tale, and adds to the universal destruction of his substance, the utter desolations of his family. His cattle and servants at plough are attacked by a roving band of Sabeans; the men slain, the oxen and asses taken; his sheep, with the shepherds, burnt up with lightning; his camels seized, and his servants slaughtered by the Chaldeans; and last, and worst of all, his children buried together under the ruins of their elder brother's house, struck by the resistless whirlwind: afflictions so many, great, and aggravated, in which not only the hand of man appeared, but the fire of God was employed, that they seemed to bespeak his displeasure, and the vanity of all that integrity and uprightness which Job had so carefully maintained. Note; (1.) The children of God must not count it strange if evil upon evil pursue them; it is not to destroy, but to prove them. (2.) There are great depths in God's providential dealings, which now we cannot fathom. (3.) If the devil had but permission, he could soon arm his instruments for our destruction; but he is bound. (4.) The loss of a child is a bitter trial, his sudden death still more afflictive; but to lose many, all at once, in the midst of gaiety, and after every other earthly comfort was gone, this, to nature, would seem quite insupportable; but what cannot divine grace enable us to bear? Are any thus afflicted? let them remember the patience of Job.

5thly, Now behold the awful change which one short day has made; the greatest man of the east stripped of every comfort, naked and destitute. Well may we say of all this world, Vanity of vanities, all is vanity. Yet hath not Satan gained the least advantage; the darker the scene, the brighter shine the graces of the holy sufferer.

1. He felt with deepest sensibility the afflicting tidings, and with the most expressive signs of bitter anguish rent his mantle, and shaved his head, and fell down upon the ground. His grief was great; and was there not a cause? yet no indecent rage, no rash extravagance appears: he felt as a man, he mourned as a believer. Note; (1.) Religion never requires stoical apathy, but patient submission. (2.) Mourning for the dead is the tribute that we owe to humanity; only let us not sorrow as those who have no hope.

2. His resignation and piety appear most distinguished. He worshipped: far from being driven to curse God, as Satan vaunted he would, he blesses the hand which smote him, and humbly submits to the divine disposal. He said, Naked came I out of my mother's womb, and brought nothing into this world, and naked shall I return thither, to the dust from whence I came, and can carry nothing out of the world: if God, therefore, please to strip him of all, he is but as he was born, and as he must be when he dies. He acknowledges God's sovereign right to all that he possessed; The Lord gave, out of his undeserved bounty, and, when he pleases, may resume his gifts: the Lord hath taken away, nor have we any cause to complain: they were his own; and that he hath lent them to us so long, deserves our thankful acknowledgment; blessed be the name of the Lord. Note; (1.) No afflictions must indispose us for God's worship; the more we feel, the more need have we of his grace to support us. (2.) The consideration of the near approach of death, when we must be stripped of all, should wean our affections from a perishing world. (3.)

Every blessing is God's gift, and every suffering from his hand, or by his permission, whatever instrument is employed. This, therefore, should make us acknowledge him in all, bless the gracious giver for the loan, and restore it, without murmuring, whenever he demands it. (4.) Whatever we lose, enough is left to deserve our thankfulness, and to engage our praise. (5.) Where God bestows a spirit of meekness and patient submission, he leaves a greater blessing behind than any outward thing of which his providence deprives us.

3. God bears testimony to Job's gracious disposition. In all this Job sinned not: his grief was not excessive, his patience was exemplary, and his faith unshaken: nor charged God foolishy; did not blaspheme as Satan hoped, nor arraign the wisdom, mercy, or goodness of God in this afflictive dispensation. Note; In great trials, God gives his believing people great grace, and then we can do all things through Christ strengthening us.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Job 1:22". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/job-1.html. 1801-1803.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

(22) In all this Job sinned not, nor charged God foolishly.

See what a seal God the Holy Ghost hath put to the faith of Jobadiah Oh! who would not with Job rejoice in tribulations, if the issue of every trial had this blessed earnest of the Spirit?

REFLECTIONS

BEHOLD, Reader! that a reverse of circumstances the relation of one short period, in the life of Job, hath produced! how quick the transition from the house of feasting, to the house of mourning. And what, but a well-grounded interest in Jesus, can prepare the heart for such changes, which an hour may induce? Depend upon it, faith in Jesus is the only adequate resource under every situation of trial. For this cause (saith Paul) we faint not. This is the cause and the only cause. While we look not at the things which are seen, but the things which are not seen. As long as we eye Jesus directing all things, ordering all things, and directing and ordering them for our sure welfare; while this is beheld, and believed, and depended upon, the soul will never faint. Then the whole world of losses, and bereaving providences, are still seen by the believer, as working out some certain, however at present it may be an hidden, good. The humble follower of Jesus like Job, will then be able to bless a taking God, as well as a giving God. The Lord hath only recalled what was lent it was his own while given: it was still his whenever he to take it away. And convinced at the same time, that the Lord's love is not lessened, the soul can and will rejoice, under the heaviest afflictions. And Reader! mark this down as exemplified in Job's instance, and as it is equally so in the instance of all the Lord's people. Whatever the Lord recalls, he never can or will take away his Christ. This once given is given forever. The charter of grace so runs, that his righteousness shall be forever, and his salvation that which shall not be abolished. Here Job found an hiding place from the storm. And here every faithful soul, may take confidence also.

While I pray God the Holy Ghost to impress upon the mind, both of the Writer and Reader, these and all other suitable reflections of a practical nature, which arise out of the view of Job's strong faith, and confidence in Jesus; I wish, if possible, yet more particularly to interest the Reader's attention with my own, in the view of Jesus in his High Priest's office, in the presentation of himself for his people, which Job so sweetly typified, when sanctifying his children and household, in the daily burnt-offerings. Who but God himself, could have brought this man of Uz, acquainted with the knowledge of sacrifices? And what but divine teaching could have led the patriarch to the belief, that there was efficacy in them, when offered with an eye to Jesus? Oh! for the lively actings of faith, upon the person, work, and salvation of the Lord Jesus, when we behold the grand sacrifice, thus uniformly shadowed forth through so many generations! Dearest Jesus! give me to rest with full confidence on thee, and thy finished redemption, and most cordially and heartily to believe the record, which God hath given of his dear Son. May it be my earnest desire to have my own soul, and all my household sanctified, with the precious offering of thy body once for all, by which thou hast forever perfected redemption; and hast fully manifested, that thou art the Lamb slain from the foundation of the world.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Job 1:22". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/job-1.html. 1828.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

i.e. Under all these pressures; or, in all that he said or did upon these sad occasions;

Job sinned not, to wit, in such manner as the devil presaged that he would, and as is expressed in the following words. As Christ saith, John 9:3, Neither hath this man sinned, nor his parents, to wit, so as you imagine, in an eminent or extraordinary degree. But both here and there human infirmities are excepted, of which Job oft acknowledgeth himself to be guilty. Nor was the question between God and Satan, whether Job had any sin in him, but whether he was a hypocrite, or would blaspheme God; which is here denied and disproved.

Nor charged God foolishly, Heb.

nor imputed folly to God, i.e. so far was he from blaspheming God, that he did not entertain any dishonourable thought of God, as if he had done any thing unworthy of his infinite wisdom, or justice, or goodness, but heartily approved of and acquiesced in his good pleasure, and in his righteous, though sharp, proceedings against him.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Job 1:22". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/job-1.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

22.Nor charged God foolishly-“In all that had befallen him” (Septuagint) he had neither sinned nor uttered folly against God. Aben Ezra’s rendering is more literal: “He spake nothing out of taste or against reason.” Tyndale gives it, “nor murmured foolishly against God.” The approval is entirely retrospective.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Job 1:22". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/job-1.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Job 1:22. In all this Job sinned not — That is, under all these pressures, or in all that he said or did upon these sad occasions, he sinned not in such a manner as Satan presaged that he would, and as is expressed in the following words. But the meaning is not that he was free from all human infirmity, of which he often acknowledges himself to be guilty. Indeed, the question between God and Satan was not whether Job had any sin in him, but whether he was a hypocrite, and would blaspheme God if brought under heavy calamities, which is here denied and disproved. Nor charged God foolishly — Hebrew, nor imputed folly to God; so far was he from blaspheming God, that he did not entertain any dishonourable thought of God, as if he had done any thing unworthy of his infinite wisdom, or justice, or goodness, but heartily acquiesced in his good pleasure, and in his righteous, though sharp proceedings against him. Discontent and impatience do, in effect, impute folly to God! Against the workings of these we should carefully watch, acknowledging that God has done well, but we have done foolishly.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Job 1:22". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/job-1.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

By his lips, is not in Hebrew but occurs [in] chap. ii. 10. --- God. Much less did he blaspheme, as satan had said, ver. 11. He did not consider all as the effect of chance, or like a mere philosopher. His thoughts were regulated by religion and the fear of God. (Calmet) --- The virtue of Job was so much the more wonderful, as he lived among the wicked. (St. Gregory) He bore patiently with the loss of all things: and English Catholics have often imitated him. (Worthington) --- He might well record his own good actions, the gifts of God, being moved by divine inspiration, like Moses, &c. (St. Gregory)

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Job 1:22". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/job-1.html. 1859.

Mark Dunagan Commentary on the Bible

"Through all this Job did not sin nor did he blame God": Yes, devotion is possible without any physical favors and there are people like Job that will serve God simply because they love Him. Is this our level of devotion is this truly our motivation? Or do we complain when the littlest thing goes wrong? Do we feel that God has blessed us more than we deserve or that we haven"t been blessed enough?

Note that Job did not even sin mentally!

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Dunagan, Mark. "Commentary on Job 1:22". "Mark Dunagan Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dun/job-1.html. 1999-2014.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

this: i.e. these calamities.

sinned. Hebrew. chata". App-44.

foolishly = with injustice.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Job 1:22". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/job-1.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

In all this Job sinned not, nor charged God foolishly.

Nor charged God foolishly - rather, allowed himself to commit no folly against God (Umbreit). Job 2:10 proves that this is the meaning. Not as margin, nor attributed folly to God. Hasty words against God, though natural in the bitterness of grief, are folly: literally, an insipid, unsavoury thing, (Job 6:6; Jeremiah 23:13, margin). Folly in Scripture is continually equivalent to wickedness (Job 24:12; Lamentations 2:14). For when man sins, it is himself, not God, whom he injures (Proverbs 8:36).

Remarks:

(1) No degree of worldly prosperity is a guarantee against sudden and great reverses; therefore, Blessed is the man who, in prosperity, feareth always, and woe to them who, "because they have no changes, fear not God" (Psalms 55:19).

(2) In festive enjoyments, however innocent in themselves, there is a danger of the natural heart becoming so intoxicated with the excitement of pleasure as to forget God, the source of all true enjoyment: we therefore should ask God's pardon if we have forgotten Him, and should go into no scene of festivity whereinto we cannot bring God with us, and whereupon we cannot ask God's blessing at its close. Job had many expiatory offerings to make from time to time in order to sanctify his sons: we Christians have one offering that has once for all been made, by which Christ has forever perfected them that are sanctified (Hebrews 10:12; Hebrews 10:14).

(3) The dispensations of Providence in the present world which are most perplexing to the believer (cf. Psalms 73:1-28) would be in a great measure cleared up if we could remove the veil which hides from us the unseen world. We should then realize the fact that the present world is a scene of probation, in which Satan's malice, though for a time let loose upon the saints, is actually being overruled by God for His final glory and their eternal good.

(4) We see in Jobs case the power of true religion exemplified. True piety recognizes God's right to do as He will with His own; and sees in affliction the hand of an Almighty Father who loves us, and therefore chastens us in order that we may be partakers of His holiness (Hebrews 12:10). We are to submit to trials, not because we see the reasons for them, nor yet as though, they were matters of chance, but because God wills them, and has a right to send them, and has His own good reasons in sending them.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 1:22". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/job-1.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(22) Foolishly.—The same word as at Job 24:12, signifying reproach or guilt. It is a noun derived from the adjective rendered “unsavoury” in Job 6:6.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Job 1:22". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/job-1.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

In all this Job sinned not, nor charged God foolishly.
In all this
2:10; James 1:4,12; 1 Peter 1:7
charged God foolishly
or, attributed folly to God.
34:10,18,19; 40:4-8; Romans 9:20 Reciprocal: Leviticus 24:11 - cursed;  2 Kings 4:26 - It is well;  1 Chronicles 19:13 - let the Lord;  Job 2:3 - holdeth;  Job 3:1 - After;  Job 33:12 - thou;  Job 34:17 - wilt;  Job 38:11 - but

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Job 1:22". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/job-1.html.