Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Job 11:15

"Then, indeed, you could lift up your face without moral defect, And you would be steadfast and not fear.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Repentance;   Righteous;   Thompson Chain Reference - Innocence-Guilt;   Life;   Spotless;   Steadfastness;   Steadfastness-Instability;   Torrey's Topical Textbook - Steadfastness;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Zophar;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Greatness of God;   Hypocrisy;   Fausset Bible Dictionary - Cain (1);   Holman Bible Dictionary - Job, the Book of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Medicine;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Job, Book of;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Spot;   Zophar;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Metals;  

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

For then shalt thou lift up thy face without spot - That is, thy face shall be bright, clear, and cheerful. Thus, we speak of a bright and happy countenance. Zophar undoubtedly designs to show what his appearance would be, contrasted with what it then was. Now his countenance was dejected and sad. It was disfigured by tears, and terror, and long continued anguish. But if he would put away iniquity, and return to God, his face would be cheerful again, and he would be a happy man.

Yea, thou shalt be steadfast, and shalt not fear - The word rendered “steadfast” (מצק mutsaq ) is from יצק yâtsaq to pour, to pour out, and is applied to liquids, or to metals which are fused and poured into a mould, and which then become hard. Hence, it is used in the sense of firm, solid, intrepid. “Gesenius.” Schultens supposes that the reference here is to metallic mirrors, made by casting, and then polished, and that the idea is, that his face would shine like such a mirror. But it may be doubted whether this interpretation is not too refined. The other and more common explanation well suits the sense, and should probably be retained.

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Bibliographical Information
Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Job 11:15". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/job-11.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

For then shall thou lift up thy face without spot,.... Either before men, being in all good conscience, walking in all the commandments and ordinances of the Lord, blameless, exercising a conscience void of offence towards God and men; and so be able to say as Samuel did, "whose ass have I taken?" &c. 1 Samuel 12:3; or rather before God, as in Job 21:26; using an holy boldness and an humble confidence with him at the throne of grace, in the view of the blood, righteousness, and sacrifice of his living Redeemer he had knowledge of, as every true believer may; who, though he is not without spot in himself, yet, being washed in the blood of Christ, and clothed in his righteousness, he is all fair, and without spot or wrinkle, or any such thing; and may stand before the throne without fault, and appear before God, and in his sight, unblamable and irreprovable:

yea, thou shalt be steadfast: firm and solid, rooted and grounded in the love of God; having a firm persuasion of interest in it, and that nothing shall separate from it; being built on the foundation of Christ, and established in the exercise of faith on him; the affections being steady towards him, and fixedly set on divine and heavenly things; continuing steadfast in the doctrines of grace, and not carried about with strange doctrines, or every wind of doctrine; as well as constant and immovable in the work of the Lord, always employed in his service, and doing his will, from which nothing can move; not reproach, affliction, and persecution; and to be thus steady and fixed is a great privilege:

and shalt not fear; evil tidings of evil times; of wars and rumours of wars, famine, pestilence, earthquakes, and other judgments; of changes and revolutions in kingdoms and states, or of what is coming upon the world, according to promise and prophecy, the heart being fixed and well established, trusting in the Lord; nor be afraid of evil men or devils, or any enemies whatever, nor of death, the king of terrors, that being one of the believer's blessings, and a friend of his; nor of hell and damnation, or the second death, or wrath to come; from all which the saints are secure.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Job 11:15". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/job-11.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

For then shalt thou lift up thy i face without spot; yea, thou shalt be stedfast, and shalt not fear:

(i) He declares the quietness of conscience and success in all things that they shall have who turn to God in true repentance.
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Bibliographical Information
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Job 11:15". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/job-11.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Zophar refers to Job‘s own words (Job 10:15), “yet will I not lift up my head,” even though righteous. Zophar declares, if Job will follow his advice, he may “lift up his face.”

spot — (Deuteronomy 32:5).

steadfast — literally, “run fast together,” like metals which become firm and hard by fusion. The sinner on the contrary is wavering.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 11:15". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/job-11.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

For then shalt thou lift up thy face without spot; yea, thou shalt be stedfast, and shalt not fear:

Lift up — Which denotes chearfulness, and holy boldness.

Without spot — Having a clear and unspotted conscience.

Steadfast — Shall have a strong and comfortable assurance of God's favour.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Job 11:15". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/job-11.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Job 11:15 For then shalt thou lift up thy face without spot; yea, thou shalt be stedfast, and shalt not fear:

Ver. 15. For then shall thou lift up thy face without spot, &c.] Repentance must be performed in faith, or else it will prove to be poenitentia Iscariotica, a Judas like repentance. Lord (said that dying saint), cast me down as low as hell in repentance, and lift me up by faith into the highest heavens in confidence of thy salvation. Zophar, that he may move Job kindly and rightly to repent, promiseth him thereupon malorum ademptionem, bonorum adeptionem, freedom from evil and fruition of good. And, first, "Thou shalt lift up thy face without spot," i.e. Thou shalt be full of comfort and of confidence, not casting down thy countenance, as guilty Cain, but looking up boldly and cheerfully, as St Stephen did, Acts 7:55-56, they saw his face as it had been the face of an angel.

Ibat ovans animis et spe sua damna levabat.

Yea, thou shall be stedfast] Or durable and compact as a molten pillar. Thy heart shall be established with grace, thy mind with peace, thine outward estate with a lasting felicity.

And shalt not fear] sc. The loss of those enjoyments. To be freed from the fear of evil is better than to be freed from evil; and a great part of the saints’ portion both on earth and in heaven lies in their deliverance from fear, Luke 1:74, Psalms 112:7, Zephaniah 3:13, Isaiah 17:2. Repent, and thou shall fear no more a revolution of any thy troubles.

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Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Job 11:15". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/job-11.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

Then shalt thou lift up thy face; which notes cheerfulness, and holy boldness and confidence; as a dejected countenance notes grief and shame. See Genesis 4:5,6 2 Samuel 2:22 Job 22:26 Luke 21:28.

Without spot; or, being without spot; so it is only an ellipsis of the verb substantive, which is most frequent. And this fitly follows as the ground of his confidence, because he should in this case have a clear and unspotted conscience, and a sense of his own innocency. Or, without blemish, as the word properly signifies, i.e. without any sense of guilt, or any shame consequent upon it, either from God or men. The ground of the expression is this, that when men’s faces are spotted with dirt, they are ashamed to show them. And Job was charged by his friends as having many spots upon him, yea, such as were not the spots of God’s children.

Stedfast; or, firm, or fixed; either,

1. As to his outward condition, which should be constantly prosperous. Or rather,

2. As to his mind, which should have strong and comfortable assurance of God’s favour, and of his own safety and happiness. For this steadfastness is opposed unto that fear which is incident to wicked men; who, even when they are free from actual miseries, yet ofttimes are tormented with the dread of them.

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Job 11:15". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/job-11.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

15.Lift up thy face — He refers to Job’s remark, (Job 10:15,) “I will not lift up my head.”

Without spot . The Septuagint gives the sentence: “For thus shall thy countenance shine again as pure water.” In the Arabic the word is applied to fever spots and marks of cutaneous disease. There is, apparently, a cruel allusion to the effects of Job’s disease upon his countenance.

Steadfast — The word in the original is used of metal that has been melted and consolidated.

 

 

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Bibliographical Information
Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Job 11:15". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/job-11.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Job 11:15. For then shalt thou lift up thy face — With cheerfulness and holy boldness. Without spot — Having a clear and unspotted conscience. Yea, thou shalt be steadfast — Shalt have a strong and comfortable assurance of God’s favour, and shalt be settled, without any fear of losing thy happiness.

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Job 11:15". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/job-11.html. 1857.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Without. Septuagint, "as clean water, thou shalt pass away corruption, and shalt not fear."

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Job 11:15". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/job-11.html. 1859.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

For then shalt thou lift up thy face without spot; yea, thou shalt be stedfast, and shalt not fear:

For then shalt thou lift up thy face without spot. Zophar refers to Job's own words (Job 10:15), "Yet will I not lift up my head," even though righteous. Zophar declares, if Job will follow his advice, he may yet 'lift up his face.'

Spot - i:e., without the spot or slur which thy present calamity attaches to thee.

Stedfast - literally, molten, or run fast together, like metals which become firm and hard by fusion (Job 37:18). The sinner, on the contrary, is wavering.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 11:15". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/job-11.html. 1871-8.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

For then shalt thou lift up thy face without spot; yea, thou shalt be stedfast, and shalt not fear:
lift up
10:15; 22:26; Genesis 4:5,6; Psalms 119:6,7; 2 Corinthians 1:12; 1 Timothy 2:8; 1 John 2:28; 1 John 3:19-22
thou shalt be
Psalms 27:1; 46:1; 112:6-8; Proverbs 14:26; 28:1
Reciprocal: Genesis 4:8 - Cain rose;  Psalm 107:41 - setteth

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Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Job 11:15". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/job-11.html.