Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Job 11:5

"But would that God might speak, And open His lips against you,
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Self-Righteousness;   Uncharitableness;   Wisdom;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Zophar;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Greatness of God;   Hypocrisy;   Easton Bible Dictionary - Lip;   Holman Bible Dictionary - God;   Job, the Book of;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Job, Book of;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

But O that God would speak - How little feeling, humanity, and charity is there in this prayer!

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Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Job 11:5". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/job-11.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

But oh that God would speak - Hebrew, “and truly, who will give that God should speak.” It is the expression of an earnest wish that God would address him, and bring him to a proper sense of his ill desert. The meaning is, that if God should speak to him he would by no means find himself so holy as he now claimed to be.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Job 11:5". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/job-11.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

But O that God would speak,.... To Job, and stop his mouth, so full of words; convict him of his lies, reprove him for his mocks and scoffs, and make him ashamed of them; refute his false doctrine and oppose it, and show him his folly and vanity in imagining it to be pure, and in conceit thinking himself to be free from sin, and even in the sight of God himself: Zophar seems by this wish to suggest, that what his friends had as yet spoke had had no effect upon Job, and signified nothing; and that he despaired of bringing him to any true sense of himself and his case, but that God only could do it; and therefore he entreats he would take him in hand, and speak unto him; as he had by his providences in afflicting him, so by his spirit in teaching and instructing him; and he adds:

and open his lips against thee; or rather, "with thee", or "to thee"F1עמך μετα σου, Sept. "tecum", Pagninus, Montanus, Beza, Vatablus, Mercerus, Cocceius, Schmidt, Michaelis; "tibi", V. L. "ad te", Piscator. ; converse with thee; speak out his mind freely; disclose the secrets of his wisdom, as in Job 11:6, and that for thy good; fully convince thee of thy sins, mistakes, and follies: for, notwithstanding all the heat and warmth of Zophar's spirit, yet, being a good man, as it cannot be thought he should wilfully and knowingly slander Job, and put a false gloss on his words, so neither could he desire any hurt or injury to be done him, or that God would deal with him as an enemy; only convince and reprove him for his sin, and justify himself and his own conduct, which he imagined Job had arraigned.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Job 11:5". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/job-11.html. 1999.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

But oh that God would speak, and open his lips against thee;

Speak — Plead with thee according to thy desire: he would soon put thee to silence. We are commonly ready with great assurance to interest God in our quarrels. But they are not always in the right, who are most forward, to appeal to his judgment, and prejudge it against their antagonists.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Job 11:5". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/job-11.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Job 11:5 But oh that God would speak, and open his lips against thee;

Ver. 5. But oh that God would speak, &c.] For we do but lose our sweet words upon thee, since thou art set, and so wedded and wedged to thine own will and way, that thou canst not be removed and rectified, but by an extraordinary touch from the hand of heaven: oh therefore that God would speak and open his lips against thee, and for us; for so Zophar doubts not but he would do; but if it proved otherwise, Job 42:7-10, Job was justified, and these three condemned, because they had not spoken of God (or to God, as in this text), the thing that was right, Job 11:7, but had been Satan’s instruments to discourage Job, and to drive that good man to many passionate speeches. Some men (and women too, as Sarah, Genesis 16:5) are overly hasty to send for God, as it were, by a post, to decide their controversies; who, if he should come at their call, would certainly pronounce against them. Fret not thyself therefore to do evil, Psalms 37:1; be not rash with thy mouth, and let not thine heart be hasty to utter anything in this way before God, Ecclesiastes 5:2, or to interest him in thy quarrels and controversies, for he will surely pass an impartial sentence; neither is there any iniquity with the Lord our God, nor respecting of persons, nor receiving of gifts, 1 Chronicles 19:7. One interpreter from this wish of Zophar noteth, that it is an ordinary practice of heretics (Satan’s factors) to mention God, as approving of their errors, if by speaking he would from heaven declare himseff plainly, and that therefore we should take heed of those that labour to work upon us this way, when by right reason they are able to evince nothing that they say.

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Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Job 11:5". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/job-11.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Job 11:5. Open his lips against thee The purpose of this wish is, that Job might be openly convicted of that wickedness of which they all concluded he must have been guilty, to draw down the wrath of God upon him to such an extraordinary degree.

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Bibliographical Information
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Job 11:5". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/job-11.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

i.e. Plead with thee, according to thy desire, Job 9:32, &c. He would soon put thee to silence and shame.

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Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Job 11:5". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/job-11.html. 1685.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Job 11:5. O that God would speak — Plead with thee according to thy desire: he would soon put thee to silence. We are commonly ready, with great assurance, to interest God in our quarrels. But they are not always in the right who are most forward to appeal to his judgment, and prejudge it against their antagonists.

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Job 11:5". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/job-11.html. 1857.

Mark Dunagan Commentary on the Bible

"I would that God would speak": Zophar wishes that God would actually intervene and answer Job (9:3,16). "Then God would speak against Job, not for him" (Zuck p. 53).

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Bibliographical Information
Dunagan, Mark. "Commentary on Job 11:5". "Mark Dunagan Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dun/job-11.html. 1999-2014.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

lips. Figure of speech Anthropopatheia. App-6.

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Bibliographical Information
Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Job 11:5". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/job-11.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

But oh that God would speak, and open his lips against thee;

No JFB commentary on this verse.

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 11:5". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/job-11.html. 1871-8.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

But oh that God would speak, and open his lips against thee;
23:3-7; 31:35; 33:6-18; 38:1,2; 40:1-5,8; 42:7
Reciprocal: Job 9:14 - shall I;  Job 13:3 - Surely

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Job 11:5". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/job-11.html.