Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Job 15:1

Then Eliphaz the Temanite responded,
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Pride;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Eliphaz;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Greatness of God;   Hypocrisy;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Job, the Book of;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Eliphaz ;  

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

JOB 15

ELIPHAZ' SECOND SPEECH: PRETENDING TO KNOW THAT JOB IS WICKED; ELIPHAZ DESCRIBES THE PUNISHMENT JOB CAN EXPECT

It is the conviction of this writer that the speech of this old hypocrite Eliphaz is merely the ostentatious declamation of an arrogant ignoramus, absolutely worthless and unworthy of any special attention.

On the basis of his false theological axiom that God metes out, during this present lifetime, the just reward of every man, blessing the righteous and heaping on the punishments on the wicked. Eliphaz proceeded, in effect, to preach Job's funeral. Jehovah himself addressed Eliphaz and the other friends of Job, saying, "Ye have not spoken of me the thing that is right" (Job 42:7); and this is reason enough for avoiding any detailed analysis of this cruel and inconsiderate speech.

What he said was unkind, brutal, cruel, inaccurate, conceited, arrogant and without any redeeming quality whatever. It was merely another bitter experience for Job, serving no other purpose than that of Satan, namely, trying in vain to force Job from his integrity.

Job 15:1-6

ELIPHAZ BLUNTLY ACCUSES JOB OF WICKEDNESS

"Then answered Eliphaz the Temanite, and said,

Should a wise man make answer with vain knowledge,

And fill himself with the east wind?

Should he reason with unprofitable talk,

Or with speeches wherewith he can do no good?

Yea, thou doest away with fear,

And hinderest (diminishes) devotion before God.

For thine iniquity teacheth thy mouth,

And thou chooseth the tongue of the crafty.

Yea, thine own lips testify against thee."

Job had just enunciated some of the greatest and most significant theological truths ever revealed from God, namely, the resurrection of the dead, and the forgiveness of sins; but such truth was lost on Eliphaz. Blinded by what he thought he knew, but didn't, he made light of Job's speech. Satan must have rejoiced at having so skillful a servant in his evil attack upon Job.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.
Bibliographical Information
Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on Job 15:1". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/job-15.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Then answered Eliphaz the Temanite,.... Or, who was of Teman, as the Targum, the first of Job's friends and comforters, the oldest of them, who first began the dispute with him; which was carried on by his two other companions, who had spoken in their turns; and now in course it fell to him to answer a second time, as he here does,

and said,

as follows.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Job 15:1". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/job-15.html. 1999.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

Job 15:1-35. Second speech of Eliphaz.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 15:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/job-15.html. 1871-8.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Job 15:1 Then answered Eliphaz the Temanite, and said,

Ver. 1. Then answered Eliphaz, the Temanite, and said] Lapides locutus est. In this second encounter Eliphaz falls upon Job, not so much with stronger arguments as with harder words; reproving him sharply, or rather reproaching him bitterly, Facundia quadam canina, with more eloquence than charity. So hard a thing is it, saith Beza, especially in disputing and reasoning, to avoid self-love, as even in these times experience daily teacheth us. He hinteth, I suppose, at the public conference between himself and Jacobus Andreas at Mompelgard, whereby the strife was rather stirred than stinted, as Thuanus complaineth (Lib. 35, Hist.); or else at the disputation at Possiacum, wherein Beza, speaker for the Protestant party (before the queen mother of France, the young King Charles, and many princes of the blood), entering into the matter of the Eucharist, spake with such heat (unless the historian wrongs him), that he gave but ill satisfaction to those of his own side, so that he was commanded to conclude. Such meetings are seldom successful, saith Luther, because men come with confidence and wit for victory rather than verity. In this reply of Eliphaz to Job we may see what an evil thing it is to be carried away with prejudice and pertinance, which make a man forget all modesty, and fall foul upon his best friends. Here is enough said to have driven this sorrowfull man into utter despair, had not God upheld his spirit, while he is fiercely charged for a wicked man, and hated of God; neither doth any of his friends henceforth afford him one exhortation to repentance, or one comfortable promise, as Lavater well observeth, Non affert ullam consolationem, non invitat eum ad poenitentiam; sed potius ad desperationem compellat.

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Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Job 15:1". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/job-15.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

CHAP. XV.

Eliphaz charges Job with impiety, in justifying himself: he proves by tradition the unhappiness of the wicked.

Before Christ 1645.

Job 15:1. Then answered Eliphaz Eliphaz, not a little incensed that Job should pay no regard to his advice, and should dare to challenge the Almighty to argue the point with him, charges him home with self-conceit, in entertaining too high an opinion of his own knowledge; with arrogance, in undervaluing the arguments drawn from their experience, whose age was a sufficient voucher for their wisdom; and with impiety, in thus rudely challenging the Almighty to answer for his conduct in afflicting him, Job 15:2-13. He presses home the same argument upon him a second time; to which he adds that of universal tradition; insinuating, that he had yet worse to expect, unless he prevented it by a contrary conduct: and then presents him with an image, setting forth the final state of a wicked man; in which he so works up the circumstances, as to make it resemble Job and his condition as much as possible; intimating thereby, that he imagined him to be that very wicked man whom he had been describing, and that he had by that means drawn down God's judgments on himself, Job 15:14-30. That therefore his conceptions of innocence were an illusion, but one, however, of the worst kind: he had deceived himself: Job 15:31-35. Heath.

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Bibliographical Information
Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Job 15:1". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/job-15.html. 1801-1803.

Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary

CONTENTS

We have in this chapter Eliphaz reassuming the argument. He falls hard upon Job, still harping upon the string of Job's hypocrisy. He maketh use of sound reasoning however, only so far as it related to Job, it was misapplied.

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Bibliographical Information
Hawker, Robert, D.D. "Commentary on Job 15:1". "Hawker's Poor Man's Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pmc/job-15.html. 1828.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

The Second Stage of the Controversy.

Chaps. 15-21.

SECOND ADDRESS OF ELIPHAZ.

1.Answered, etc. — Eliphaz, who was the first speaker in the first circle of debate, now urges that the talk of Job was not only as unprofitable as an east wind, but really destructive to all piety. He taunts him with assuming a monopoly of wisdom such as could only have been gathered from some prior existence or from the council chamber of God. To convince Job of the folly of his arrogance, he alludes again to the revelation he had himself received, from which Job may learn that man’s place in the scale of righteousness is lower even than in that of wisdom. His own observation agreed with the sentiment of an ancient poem, that there is a perfect scheme of retribution in this world. The prosperity of the wicked man is only apparent. He lives a life of anguish; his fields are covered with blasted fruit; he reaps the vanity he has sown. The view of Eliphaz is limited by the theorem that suffering is an evidence either of a guilty life or an impure heart.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Job 15:1". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/job-15.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Job 15:1. Then answered Eliphaz — Eliphaz, not a little incensed that Job should pay no regard to his advice, and should dare to challenge the Almighty to argue the point with him, charges him home with self-conceit in entertaining too high an opinion of his own knowledge; with arrogance in undervaluing the arguments drawn from their experience, whose age was a sufficient voucher for their wisdom; and with impiety, in thus rudely challenging the Almighty to answer for his conduct in afflicting him. He presses home the same argument upon him a second time, to which he adds that of universal tradition; insinuating, that he had yet worse to expect unless he prevented it by a contrary conduct: and then presents him with a picture of the final state of a wicked man; in which he so works up the circumstances as to make it resemble Job and his condition as much as possible; intimating thereby, that he imagined him to be that very wicked man he had been describing, and that he had by that means drawn down God’s judgments on himself: that, therefore, his imaginations of innocence were an illusion; but one, however, of the worst kind; he had deceived himself. — Heath.

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Bibliographical Information
Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Job 15:1". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/job-15.html. 1857.

Mark Dunagan Commentary on the Bible

"Should a wise man answer with windy knowledge and fill himself with the east wind?" Eliphaz had been insulted by Job"s long speeches, which he calls windy defenses, or like a hot east wind, the dreaded desert sirocco, "Job"s words blew hard but were useless" (Bible Knowledge Comm. p. 736). Basically he is accusing Job of being a windbag and full of hot air.

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Bibliographical Information
Dunagan, Mark. "Commentary on Job 15:1". "Mark Dunagan Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dun/job-15.html. 1999-2014.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

answered = replied. See note on Job 4:1.

Eliphaz. See note on Job 2:11. This is the second of his three addresses.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Job 15:1". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/job-15.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Then answered Eliphaz the Temanite, and said,

No JFB commentary on this verse.

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Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 15:1". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/job-15.html. 1871-8.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Then answered Eliphaz the Temanite, and said,
Eliphaz
2:11; 4:1; 22:1; 42:7,9
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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Job 15:1". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/job-15.html.

Arthur Peake's Commentary on the Bible

Job 15:1. Here begins the second cycle of the debate. Eliphaz had before said everything possible, presuming Job's real goodness—he had explained how he must accept his sufferings as a Divine chastisement, and be instructed by them. Job, however, rejects all this, and Eliphaz is consequently compelled to conclude that Job is a despiser of religion and wholly impious: all he can do is to point out the consequences of such irreligion and impiety.

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These files are public domain.
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Bibliographical Information
Peake, Arthur. "Commentary on Job 15:1". "Arthur Peake's Commentary on the Bible ". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pfc/job-15.html. 1919.