Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Job 15:22

"He does not believe that he will return from darkness, And he is destined for the sword.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Wicked (People);   The Topic Concordance - Destruction;   Opposition;   Wickedness;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Eliphaz;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Greatness of God;   Hypocrisy;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Fate;   Job, the Book of;  
Encyclopedias:
The Jewish Encyclopedia - Death, Angel of;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

That he shall return out of darkness - If he take but a few steps in the dark, he expects the dagger of the assassin. This appears to be the only meaning of the place. Some think the passage should be understood to signify that he has no hope of a resurrection; he can never escape from the tomb. This I doubt: in the days of the writer of this book, the doctrine of a future judgment was understood in every part of the East where the knowledge of the true God was diffused.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Job 15:22". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/job-15.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

He believeth not that he shall return out of darkness - Darkness is used in the Bible, as elsewhere, to denote calamity; and the meaning here is, that the wicked man has not confidence (יאמין לא lo' ya'amı̂yn ), that he shall return safely from impending danger. He is in constant dread of assassination, or of some fearful evil. He is never secure; his mind is never calm; he lives in constant dread. This is still an accurate description of a man with a guilty conscience; for such a man lives in constant fear, and never feels any security that he is safe.

And he is waited for of the sword - That is, he is destined for the sword. Gesenius.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Job 15:22". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/job-15.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

He believeth not that he shall return out of darkness,.... When he lies down at night he despairs of ever seeing the light of the morning, through fear of an enemy, a robber, a murderer, or of one disaster or another, Deuteronomy 28:66; or when he is in any affliction and calamity, which is often signified by darkness, he cannot persuade himself that he shall ever be delivered out of it, and restored to his former condition again: and here Eliphaz seems to glance at Job, who had no hope of his being brought into such a state of prosperity he had been in; whereas good men, when in darkness, believe they shall be brought again to the light, as the church in Micah 7:8; or the infidel, who knows he must be laid in the dark and silent grave; the Heathen man, such as were many of the neighbours of Eliphaz, the Idumeans, among whom he dwelt, who were without the hope of a glorious resurrection; and which is an article of pure revelation, and which the idolatrous Heathen were strangers to, and so believed it not, or any deliverance from the grave; or this may respect the blackness of darkness, the outer darkness, the darkness of hell, which when once a wicked man is cast into, and enveloped with, he despairs, as he well may, of ever being delivered out of it:

and he is waited for of the sword; or by them that kill with the sword, as the Targum, who lie in wait for him, to rob him, and kill him; or in his own apprehension he seems to have nothing but drawn swords about him, or a sword hanging over his head, or the judgments of God ready to fall upon him for his sins; for he, having killed others with the sword, must expect to be killed with it himself.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Job 15:22". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/job-15.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

He believeth not that he shall return out of n darkness, and he is waited for of the sword.

(n) Out of that misery to which he once fell.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Job 15:22". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/job-15.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

darkness — namely, danger or calamity. Glancing at Job, who despaired of restoration: in contrast to good men when in darkness (Micah 7:8, Micah 7:9).

waited for of — that is, He is destined for the sword [Gesenius]. Rather (in the night of danger), “he looks anxiously towards the sword,” as if every sword was drawn against him [Umbreit].

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 15:22". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/job-15.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

He believeth not that he shall return out of darkness, and he is waited for of the sword.

Believeth not — When he falls into trouble, he despairs of deliverance, by reason of his guilty conscience.

Waited for — Besides the calamity which is upon him, he is in constant expectation of greater; the sword is used for any grievous affliction.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Job 15:22". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/job-15.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Job 15:22 He believeth not that he shall return out of darkness, and he is waited for of the sword.

Ver. 22. He believeth not that he shall return out of darkness] He despondeth and despaireth of a better condition, sighing out that doleful ditty, Spes et fortuna valete; Farewell hope and fortune, he looks for no further light and delight of former comforts; he knows that they that go down into the dark pit cannot hope for God’s truth, Isaiah 38:18; there being left them neither hope of better nor place of worse. Desperat qui summus est diffidentiae gradus (Jun.).

And he is waited for of the sword] Or, looked upon by the sword, which waiteth, as it were, an opportunity to slay him. Circumspectans undique gladium, so the Vulgate; he looketh this way and that way, as fearing the murderer; his guilt representing to him on all sides nothing but naked swords; he believeth that they will assassinate him in his bed. This was the case of Saul, who suspected his best servants; of Dionysius the tyrant, who durst not trust his own daughter with his throat; of Alexander Pheraeus, who would not go to bed to his wife Thebe, whom he loved, till he had first searched the room and her pocket for edge-tools (Cicero. Offic. lib. 2); of Richard III, who, after the death of his two innocent nephews, had fearful dreams and apprehensions, insomuch that he did often leap out of his bed in the dark, and catching his sword (which, always naked, stuck by his side), he did go distractedly about the chamber, everywhere seeking to find out the cause of his own occasioned disquiet, saith the chronologer (Dan. Hist. 249). Tiberius felt the remorse of conscience so violently, that he protested to the Senate that he suffered death daily through fear of death; whereupon the historian maketh this profitable observation, Tandem facinora et flagitia in supplicium vertuntur, Heinous sins will at length have heavy punishments (Tacit.).

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Job 15:22". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/job-15.html. 1865-1868.

Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible

Job 15:22. He is waited for He is marked out for, destined to. Heath.

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Coke, Thomas. "Commentary on Job 15:22". Thomas Coke Commentary on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tcc/job-15.html. 1801-1803.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

i.e. When he falls into trouble, he despairs of God’s mercy, and of deliverance, by reason of his guilty conscience; which he speaks with particular reflection upon Job, who would receive no comfort nor matter of hope.

He is waited for of the sword, i.e. besides the calamity which is upon him, he is in constant expectation of further and greater miseries; for the sword is oft used for any grievous affliction, as Luke 2:35.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Job 15:22". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/job-15.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

22.Darkness — Destruction is represented by the figure of night.

The sword — Metaphorical for the wrath of God. The same poet (ibid.) speaks of the naked sword suspended over the impious neck of the tyrant.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Job 15:22". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/job-15.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

CHAPTER XV.

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Job 15:22". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/job-15.html. 1859.

Mark Dunagan Commentary on the Bible

"The meaning is that the sinner is tormented by his guilty conscience; he is always fearing that he may not awake from his sleep, or he is always dreading misfortune" (Zuck p. 72). In addition, he is destined for the sword, that is, destined to suffer a violent death because he himself was violent against others.

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Dunagan, Mark. "Commentary on Job 15:22". "Mark Dunagan Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dun/job-15.html. 1999-2014.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

waited for of the sword = destined to the power of the sword.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Job 15:22". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/job-15.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

He believeth not that he shall return out of darkness, and he is waited for of the sword.

Darkness - namely, danger or calamity. Glancing at Job, who despaired of restoration: in contrast to good men when in darkness (Micah 7:8-9).

Waited for of - i:e., He is destined for the sword (Gesenius), or (in the night of dinner) 'he looks anxiously toward the sword,' as if every sword was drawn against him (Umbreit) [ tsaapuwy (Hebrew #6822) huw' (Hebrew #1931) 'eleey (Hebrew #413) chaareb (Hebrew #2719)]. The English version is more literal, except that the Hebrew for "of" is toward. He fancies he is doomed to the sword.

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Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 15:22". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/job-15.html. 1871-8.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

He believeth not that he shall return out of darkness, and he is waited for of the sword.
He believeth not
6:11; 9:16; 2 Kings 6:33; Isaiah 8:21,22; Matthew 27:5
and he is
20:24,25
Reciprocal: Genesis 4:13 - GeneralGenesis 50:15 - Joseph;  Leviticus 26:36 - I will send;  Judges 7:21 - all the host;  1 Samuel 25:37 - his heart;  1 Kings 1:41 - Wherefore;  1 Kings 1:52 - wickedness;  Esther 7:6 - was afraid;  Job 15:30 - depart;  Job 23:17 - the darkness from;  Psalm 107:14 - brought;  Isaiah 33:14 - sinners

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Job 15:22". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/job-15.html.