Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Job 15:27

"For he has covered his face with his fat And made his thighs heavy with flesh.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Nave's Topical Bible - Wicked (People);   The Topic Concordance - Destruction;   Wickedness;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Eliphaz;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Greatness of God;   Hypocrisy;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Face;   Job, the Book of;   Hastings' Dictionary of the Bible - Beth-Pelet;   Morrish Bible Dictionary - Collops;   People's Dictionary of the Bible - Obsolete or obscure words in the english av bible;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Collop;   Face;   Fatness;   Job, Book of;   Make;   The Jewish Encyclopedia - Fat;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

Because he covereth his face - He has lived in luxury and excess; and like a man overloaded with flesh, he cannot defend himself against the strong gripe of his adversary. The Arabic, for maketh collops of fat on his flanks, has (Arabic) He lays the Pleiades upon the Hyades, or, He places Surreea upon aiyuk, a proverbial expression for, His ambition is boundless; He aspires as high as heaven; His head touches the stars; or, is like the giants of old, who were fabled to have attempted to scale heaven by placing one high mountain upon another: -

Ter sunt conati imponere Pelio Ossam

Scilicet, atque Ossae frondosum involvere Olympum

Ter Pater extructos disjecit fulmine montes.

Virg. Geor. i., ver. 281.

"With mountains piled on mountains, thrice they strove

To scale the steepy battlements of Jove;

And thrice his lightning and red thunder play'd,

And their demolished works in ruins laid."

Dryden.

To the lust of power and the schemes of ambition there are no bounds; but see the end of such persons: the haughty spirit precedes a fall; their palaces become desolate; and their heaven is reduced to a chaos.

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Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Job 15:27". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/job-15.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

Because he covereth his face with his fatness - That is, he not only stretches out his hand against God Job 15:25 and rushes upon him as an armed foe Job 15:26, but he gives himself up to a life of luxury, gluttony, and licentiousness; and therefore, these calamities must come upon him. This is designed to be a description of a luxurious and licentious person - a man who is an enemy of God, and who, therefore, must incur his displeasure.

And maketh collops of fat - Like an ox that is fattened. The word collop properly means “a small slice of meat, a piece of flesh” (Webster), but here it means a thick piece, or a mass. The word is used in this sense in New England. The sense is, that he becomes excessively fat and gross - as they usually do who live in sensual indulgence and who forget God.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Job 15:27". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/job-15.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

Because he covereth his face with his fatness,.... He has no fear of God, nor shame for his sin; he blushes not to rise up against God in the manner he does, because his eyes stand out with fatness; or rather his face is covered with it, that is, he abounds in riches, he enjoys great prosperity, a large affluence of all good things; and this makes him haughty and imperious, neither to fear God, nor regard man like Jeshurun, who, when he "waxed fat, was grown thick, and covered with fatness, kicked" against God, and his providences, sinned and rebelled against him; "forsook God which made him, and lightly esteemed the Rock of his salvation", Deuteronomy 32:15; and to the same purpose is the following clause:

and maketh collops of fat in his flanks; a description of a very fat man, and one that pampers the flesh, and indulges himself in eating and drinking; and, figuratively, of one that abounds in the good things of this world, and which make him vain and proud, and lead him on to commit sin in a bold and daring way, promising himself impunity in it, but without any just ground for it, as the following verses show; perhaps some respect may be had to Job's children feasting with one another in their prosperity, which led on to sin, and issued in their ruin, as Eliphaz would suggest.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855
Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Job 15:27". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/job-15.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

Because he covereth his face with q his fatness, and maketh collops of fat on [his] flanks.

(q) That is, he was so puffed up with prosperity and abundance for all things, that he forgave God: noting that Job in his happiness did not have the true fear of God.
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Bibliographical Information
Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Job 15:27". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/job-15.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

The well-nourished body of the rebel is the sign of his prosperity.

collops — masses of fat. He pampers and fattens himself with sensual indulgences; hence his rebellion against God (Deuteronomy 32:15; 1 Samuel 2:29).

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 15:27". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/job-15.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

Because he covereth his face with his fatness, and maketh collops of fat on his flanks.

Because — This is mentioned as the reason of his insolent carriage towards God, because he was fat, rich, potent, and successful, as that expression signifies, Deuteronomy 32:15; Psalm 78:31; Jeremiah 46:21. His great prosperity made him proud and secure, and regardless of God and men.

Fat — His only care is to pamper himself.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
Bibliographical Information
Wesley, John. "Commentary on Job 15:27". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/job-15.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Job 15:27 Because he covereth his face with his fatness, and maketh collops of fat on [his] flanks.

Ver. 27. Because he covereth his face with his fatness] This is given in as one chief cause of his insolence; he is a belly god, he maketh plaits upon the paunch, so Broughton rendereth it; he hath fattened his guts, so Calvin; he maketh it his business to pamper his body; his heart also is as fat as grease, Psalms 119:70. Bene curavit cutem suam in hoc mundo He takes good care of his skin in this world. (Vat.). He is waxen fat, that is, prosperity proud, and kicketh, Deuteronomy 32:15. Pride and fulness of bread were Sodom’s twin sins, Ezekiel 16:49. When people are provender pricked, as we call it, they easily turn the grace of God into lasciviousness, 1:4, and that fulness breeds forgetfulness; as the fed hawk soon forgets his master, and the moon at fullest gets farthest off the sun. Sensualists who love feasts, 5:10, are void of the Spirit, 1:19. A full belly maketh a foul heart. The rankest weeds grow out of the fattest soil; and those that make their gut a gulf, well, they may have collops in their flanks, but they have leanness in their souls; indeed, they have (as swine) their souls for salt only, to keep their bodies from putrefying.

And maketh collops of fat on his flanks] Heb. And maketh mouths, that is, wrinkles, upon his flanks. He is active about it, and makes it his business to make provision for the flesh, Romans 13:14. He labours "for the meat that perisheth," John 6:27. He lives to eat, and laughs himself fat, till his heart, now hardened for the deceitfulness of his sin, becomes as insensible as Dionysius’, the Heracleot, who felt not when men thrust needles into his fat belly; or those bears in Pliny, that could not be stirred with the sharpest prickles.

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Bibliographical Information
Trapp, John. "Commentary on Job 15:27". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/job-15.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

With his fatness: this is mentioned as the reason of his insolent carriage towards God, because he was fat, i.e. rich, and potent, and successful, as that expression signifies, Deuteronomy 32:15 Psalms 78:31 Jeremiah 46:21. His great prosperity made him proud and secure, and regardless of God and men.

Maketh collops of fat on his flanks; his only care and study is to pamper and please himself, and obey his own mind and lusts, and in defence and pursuance of them he contends with God.

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Bibliographical Information
Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Job 15:27". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/job-15.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

27.Maketh collops of fat on his flanks — Literally, he maketh (gathereth) fat upon his loins. Job 15:27-28 contain the second reason for the destiny of the wicked, “his contentment on the ruin of another’s prosperity.” — Delitzsch. The misery of others does not trouble him, he grows fat in its midst. The words are rank with the corruption of human nature. The Greeks had a word, επιχαιρεκακια, (ARISTOTLE, Ethics, 2:7, 15,) which appears also in the German, schadenfreude, signifying the joy which man feels in the sufferings of others. The text sets before us the anger of Heaven at the contemplation of a self-complacent, bloated sinner, “the fatness” upon whose “face” has been made out of the destruction of others — a pampered human spider, surrounded by his gray web, lined with the refuse of many a gory feast. Isaiah 5:8; Habakkuk 2:5; Habakkuk 2:12. The two rich men of whom Christ speaks will recur to the reader. (Luke 12:18; Luke 16:19.)

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Job 15:27". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/job-15.html. 1874-1909.

Joseph Benson's Commentary of the Old and New Testaments

Job 15:27. He covereth his face with his fatness — This is mentioned as the reason of his insolent carriage toward God. because he was fat, rich, potent, and successful, as that expression signifies, Deuteronomy 32:15; Psalms 78:31; Jeremiah 46:21. His great prosperity made him proud and secure, and regardless of God and men. Maketh collops of fat on his flanks — His only care is to pamper and please himself, and satisfy his own lusts, and in defence and pursuance of them he contends with God.

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Benson, Joseph. "Commentary on Job 15:27". Joseph Benson's Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/rbc/job-15.html. 1857.

Mark Dunagan Commentary on the Bible

The inference is that Job has become guilty of self-indulgence, that is, the fattened face and bulging midline. "The image is one of gluttonous fatness, the characteristic of spiritual insensibility (Psalm 73:7). This wicked insensitive person sits around and gets fatter. The Hebrew pimah means "blubber" or a superabundance of fat on the man"s loins" (Strauss p. 149).

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Dunagan, Mark. "Commentary on Job 15:27". "Mark Dunagan Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dun/job-15.html. 1999-2014.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

collops = lumps, or slices.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Job 15:27". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/job-15.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

Because he covereth his face with his fatness, and maketh collops of fat on his flanks.

The well-nourished body of the rebel is the sign of his prosperity.

Collops - masses of fat. He pampers and fattens himself with sensual indulgences, making a god of his belly (Philippians 3:19). Hence, his rebellion against God (Deuteronomy 32:15; 1 Samuel 2:29).

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 15:27". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/job-15.html. 1871-8.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

Because he covereth his face with his fatness, and maketh collops of fat on his flanks.
he covereth
17:10; Deuteronomy 32:15; Psalms 17:10; 73:7; 78:31; Isaiah 6:10; Jeremiah 5:28
Reciprocal: Judges 3:17 - a very fat;  Judges 3:29 - lusty;  Job 21:24 - His breasts

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Job 15:27". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/job-15.html.