Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

Job 15:5

"For your guilt teaches your mouth, And you choose the language of the crafty.
New American Standard Version

Bible Study Resources

Concordances:
Thompson Chain Reference - Craftiness;   Duplicity;   Simplicity-Duplicity;  
Dictionaries:
American Tract Society Bible Dictionary - Eliphaz;   Baker Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology - Evil;   Charles Buck Theological Dictionary - Greatness of God;   Hypocrisy;   Works, Good;   Holman Bible Dictionary - Job, the Book of;   Tongue;  
Encyclopedias:
International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Eliphaz (2);   Job, Book of;  

Adam Clarke Commentary

For thy mouth uttereth - In attempting to justify thyself, thou hast added iniquity to sin, and hast endeavored to impute blame to thy Maker.

The tongue of the crafty - Thou hast varnished thy own conduct, and used sophistical arguments to defend thyself. Thou resemblest those cunning persons, ערומים arumim, who derive their skill and dexterity from the old serpent, "the nachash, who was ערום arum, subtle, or crafty, beyond all the beasts of the field;" Genesis 3:1. Thy wisdom is not from above, but from beneath.

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Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on Job 15:5". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/job-15.html. 1832.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

For thy mouth uttereth thine iniquity - Margin, “teacheth.” That is, “your whole argument shows that you are a guilty man. A man who can defend such positions about God cannot be a pious man, or have any proper veneration for the Most High.” A man may pursue an argument, and defend positions, that shall as certainly show that he is destitute of religion as though he lived an abandoned life; and he who holds opinions that are dishonorable to God, can no more be a pious man than if he dishonored God by violating his law.

Thou choosest the tongue of the crafty - Instead of pursuing an argument with candor and sincerity, you have resorted to miserable sophisms, such as running disputants use. You have not showed a disposition to ascertain and defend the truth, but have relied on the arts and evasions of the subtle disputant and the rhetorician. His whole discourse, according to Eliphaz, was a work of mere art, designed to blind his hearers; to deceive them with a favorable opinion of his piety; and to give some plausible, but delusive view of the government of God.

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on Job 15:5". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/job-15.html. 1870.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

For thy mouth uttereth thine iniquity,.... Which was in his heart, and so was an evidence against him, and proved him perverse, and made good the above charges exhibited against him: or "thine iniquity teaches thy mouth"F25יאלף עונך פיך "docuit iniquitas tua os tuum", V. L. Pagninus, Bolducius; "docebit", Montanus; "docet", Piscator, Cocceius; so Tigurine version. ; the wickedness that was in his heart prompted his mouth to speak the things he did, see Matthew 12:34; and this, as it was an instance of his folly, Proverbs 15:2; so a proof of his casting off the fear of the Lord; for if that had been before his eyes, he would have bridled his lips, and not uttered all the wickedness of his heart: for he that "bridleth not his tongue, this man's religion is vain", James 1:26;

and thou choosest the tongue of the crafty; coloured over things under specious pretences of religion and godliness, so that the simple and ignorant took him for a holy good man, when he was at heart an hypocrite; in this light Eliphaz puts Job, as one that walked and talked in craftiness, and was a deceitful worker, and imposed upon men with false glosses and plausible pretences.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on Job 15:5". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/job-15.html. 1999.

Geneva Study Bible

For thy mouth uttereth thine iniquity, and thou choosest the d tongue of the crafty.

(d) You speak as the mockers and contemners of God do.
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Beza, Theodore. "Commentary on Job 15:5". "The 1599 Geneva Study Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/gsb/job-15.html. 1599-1645.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

The sophistry of thine own speeches proves thy guilt.

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These files are a derivative of an electronic edition prepared from text scanned by Woodside Bible Fellowship.
This expanded edition of the Jameison-Faussett-Brown Commentary is in the public domain and may be freely used and distributed.
Bibliographical Information
Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 15:5". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfb/job-15.html. 1871-8.

Wesley's Explanatory Notes

For thy mouth uttereth thine iniquity, and thou choosest the tongue of the crafty.

Uttereth — Thy words discover the naughtiness of thy heart.

Crafty — Thou speakest wickedly, and craftily: thou coverest thy impious principles with fair pretences of piety.

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These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.
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Wesley, John. "Commentary on Job 15:5". "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/wen/job-15.html. 1765.

John Trapp Complete Commentary

Job 15:5 For thy mouth uttereth thine iniquity, and thou choosest the tongue of the crafty.

Ver. 5. For thy mouth uttereth thine iniquity] Heb. Thy crooked, wry disposition, that standeth across to God and goodness, Psalms 51:5, Homo est inversus decalogus. Solomon speaketh of perverse lips, as if the upper lip stood where the nether should, Proverbs 4:24. And St Jude speaketh of hard speeches, uttered by ungodly sinners, 1:15, such as Job was none, whatever Eliphaz, by misinterpreting, made of him, wresting his words to a wrong sense, as Psalms 54:5, and, by a spiritual unmannerliness, making the worst of what he spake; there being not anything that may not be taken with the left hand. Now, if this befell Job from his friends and those godly persons, what wonder though the like, and worse, be done to us by wicked enemies?

Qui id quod boni est excerpunt, dicunt quod mali est.

Nihil est quin male narrando possit depravarier. - (Terent. Phorm.)

And thou choosest the tongue of the crafty] Than the which nothing is a greater enemy to piety, saith an interpreter. Politicians formalize and enervate the power of truth, till at length they leave us a heartless and sapless religion, saith another. Such a one Eliphaz makes Job to be: q.d. Thou wast wont to speak prayer, but now thou speakest policy, yea, Thou choosest to do it, thou lovest evil more than good, and lying rather than to speak right, Psalms 52:3. Thou hast as many turnings and windings in thy mind as the serpent hath in his body (so the Hebrew word seemeth to signify, Genesis 3:1). Thus he heighteneth his charge, and layeth on yet more load.

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Trapp, John. "Commentary on Job 15:5". John Trapp Complete Commentary. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jtc/job-15.html. 1865-1868.

Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible

i.e. Thy words discover the naughtiness of thy heart, and justify my charge against time, that thou castest off fear, &c. Thou speakest wickedly, but craftily; thou coverest thy impious principles and passions with fair pretences of piety and respect to God, wherewith thou endeavourest to mock God, and deceive men.

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Poole, Matthew, "Commentary on Job 15:5". Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mpc/job-15.html. 1685.

Whedon's Commentary on the Bible

5.Uttereth Š, (yealleph,) teacheth. Iniquity is the grammatical subject of the sentence, which should read, For thine iniquity teacheth thee. Iniquity was his oracle — “an oracle of transgression,” , (Psalms 36:2,) a kind of demon, in the inmost recesses of the heart, whispering the dialect, (the alephs,) the abc’s of evil.

Crafty ’Haroum; the same word is used of the serpent in Genesis 3:1. The use of this comparatively rare word may have made it an offensive echo of the preceding thought. “Job plays the part of a thief, who, when accused, strives to criminate his accusers.” — Ewald.

 

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Whedon, Daniel. "Commentary on Job 15:5". "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/whe/job-15.html. 1874-1909.

George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary

Blasphemers. Hebrew, "of the crafty," which is sometimes taken in a good sense. Septuagint, "thou hast not distinguished the speeches of the princes." Thou hast not shewn respect to our admonitions, (Calmet) or understood our meaning. (Haydock) --- Thou rather choosest to imitate those false sages, who strive to deceive the world. Abuse could hardly be carried to greater lengths than it is by this man; who before spoke with some moderation, chap. iv. (Calmet)

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Haydock, George Leo. "Commentary on Job 15:5". "George Haydock's Catholic Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/job-15.html. 1859.

Mark Dunagan Commentary on the Bible

"For your guilt teaches your mouth, and you choose the language of the crafty": The accusation here is that Job"s rebellion, for which God is supposedly punishing him, is now breaking out in his speech. "Your sin causes you to speak irreverently against God. Your very words of boastful self-defense testify to the presence of inner sin" (Zuck p. 69). In addition, Job is speaking like the "crafty", the same Hebrew word is used of the serpent in Genesis 3:1.

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Dunagan, Mark. "Commentary on Job 15:5". "Mark Dunagan Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dun/job-15.html. 1999-2014.

E.W. Bullinger's Companion Bible Notes

iniquity. Hebrew. "avah, App-44.

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Bullinger, Ethelbert William. "Commentary on Job 15:5". "E.W. Bullinger's Companion bible Notes". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bul/job-15.html. 1909-1922.

Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged

For thy mouth uttereth thine iniquity, and thou choosest the tongue of the crafty.

The sophistry of thine own speeches proves thy guilt. The sophistry of thine own speeches proves thy guilt.

Uttereth - margin, rightly 'teacheth.' The craft of Job consisted, according to Eliphaz, in his transferring the blame to his friends, and accusing them of being "forgers of lies" (Job 13:4; Job 13:7).

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Jamieson, Robert, D.D.; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. "Commentary on Job 15:5". "Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible - Unabridged". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/job-15.html. 1871-8.

Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers

(5) Thy mouth uttereth thine iniquity.—These words may mean either “Thy mouth teacheth thine iniquity,” or “Thine iniquity teacheth thy mouth,” and the second clause must be taken adversatively or otherwise according as we understand the meaning, “Thy mouth proclaimeth thine iniquity, though thou choosest the tongue of the crafty, and so contrivest in some degree to conceal it;” or, “Thine iniquity teacheth thy mouth its eloquence, and by consequence thou choosest the tongue of the crafty.” We incline to the latter, though it is fair to say that the next verse seems rather to favour the other meaning.

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Ellicott, Charles John. "Commentary on Job 15:5". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ebc/job-15.html. 1905.

Treasury of Scripture Knowledge

For thy mouth uttereth thine iniquity, and thou choosest the tongue of the crafty.
uttereth
Heb. teacheth.
9:22-24; 12:6; Mark 7:21,22; Luke 6:45; James 1:26
thou choosest
Psalms 50:19,20; 52:2-4; 64:3; 120:2,3; Jeremiah 9:3-5,8; James 3:5-8
Reciprocal: Genesis 27:24 - I am;  Job 9:20 - mine;  Job 22:5 - not thy;  Job 22:20 - our substance;  Job 33:32 - GeneralJob 34:8 - GeneralJeremiah 9:5 - taught;  Matthew 23:31 - witnesses;  Matthew 25:26 - Thou;  Luke 19:22 - Out

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Torrey, R. A. "Commentary on Job 15:5". "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/job-15.html.